Reading Circles

Reading Circles bring educators together for cross-disciplinary conversation to build knowledge, community and collaboration.

Join our conversation!


  • Click to Show/HidePost-Celebration Reading Circle: Teach Students How to Learn

    Reading Circles bring educators together for cross-disciplinary conversation to build knowledge, community and collaboration.


    Join our “brown bag” conversations in spring 2020 semester focused on Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate Into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation by Saundra McGuire, Ph.D.


    Although this Reading Circle is a follow up to the February 7th Celebration of Teaching and Learning event in which Dr. McGuire was the keynote speaker, you do not need to have attended the Celebration to participate in this opportunity to read and discuss her book.


    Reading Circle Purpose:

    To provide UofL faculty and staff the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of learning theory and cognitive psychology by reading a book in common about learning theory.

    Audience:

    Faculty and staff interested in the topic

    Facilitator:

    Keith Lyle, Associate Professor, Psychological and Brain Sciences


    Patty Payette, Sr. Associate Director, Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

    Meeting Dates:

    Reading circles will take place as a brown bag gathering, 12 – 1 p.m. on the 3 Fridays listed below in the TILL Conference Room on the 3rd floor of Ekstrom Library.

    • March 6
    • March 27
    • April 10

    Description:

    Join us as we read and discuss Teach Students How to Learn by scholar and emeritus faculty member, Saundra McGuire. Many 21st century students come to college with uneven learning skills, little knowledge about how to work smarter, and even less interest in investing time or effort in learning. Sometimes we lament that our learners are focused on achieving high grades and are not willing to focus on learning the information. Reading this book together offers insights and practical approaches to address this issue.


    Some of the questions we will examine include:

    • What are some concepts related to metacognition and how do they translate into teaching practices?
    • What is self-regulation theory and how does it relate to student learning?
    • What are the strategies from the book that I am willing to try with my students?

    REGISTER NOW


    A copy of the book, and the first reading assignment, will be provided to registrants in advance of the first meeting.


    For more information, please contact Patty Payette at patty.payette@louisville.edu or 502-852-5171.

  • Click to Show/HideSpring 2020 Reading Circle: Teach Students How to Learn

    Purpose:

    To provide UofL faculty and staff the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of learning theory and cognitive psychology by reading a book in common about learning theory.

    Audience:

    Faculty and staff interested in the topic, with special outreach to part-time faculty.

    Facilitator:

    Nisha Gupta and co-facilitator (TBD) will lead the group.


    Meeting Dates:

    Reading circles take place monthly on Thursday evenings from 5 – 6:30 p.m. in the Delphi Center Lab (Ekstrom Library #244). Dinner will be provided.

    • January 23
    • February 20
    • March 26
    • April 9

    Description:

    Join us as we read, Teach Students How to Learn, by scholar and emeritus faculty member, Saundra McGuire. Many 21st Century students come to college with widely varying learning skills, little knowledge about how to work smarter, and even less interest in investing time or effort in learning. As faculty, we often lament that our learners are focused on achieving high grades and are not willing to focus on learning the information. Reading this book together offers insights and practical approaches to address this issue. Our group will meet 4 times over the course of the fall semester.


    Some of the questions we will examine include:


    • What are some concepts related to metacognition and how do they translate into teaching practices?
    • What is self-regulation theory and how does it relate to student learning?

    For more information, please contact Nisha Gupta at nisha.gupta@louisville.edu or 502-852-5104.

 
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