Composition Program

The E-Files is a teaching resource for instructors in the English Department at the University of Louisville. This site allows you to search for policy statements, syllabi, assignments and student papers for any English class taught through UofL, to join in online discussions about teaching, and to find links to other relevant information.

University of Louisville Composition Program

Information about the Composition Program in the English Department at the University of Louisville.

The Composition Program at the University of Louisville has a long history of helping students develop their composing processes to meet the challenges of writing in their academic, professional, and personal lives. Our courses support students as they use writing to learn, to solve problems, and to communicate with a variety of audiences. From first-year composition through our advanced writing courses, we encourage students to compose in multiple drafts, to seek reader feedback, and to think rhetorically about their writing purpose, context, and audience expectations. 

For Instructors graphic

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For Students

Information for students in the Composition Program at the University of Louisville.

The composition program at the University of Louisville offers courses designed to help students at a variety of levels improve their writing and rhetorical skills, both within and outside of their disciplines. We offer English 101 (Introduction to College Writing), English 102 (Intermediate College Writing), English 105 (Honors Composition), English 303 (Scientific & Technical Writing), English 306 (Business Writing), and English 309 (Inquiries into Writing).  For more information about these courses, including student outcomes, see the full course descriptions

Got a question about a program policy?

Want more help with your writing?

Cardinal Compositions

Cardinal Compositions Current Volume: Volume 4 (2020)

The link address is:https://ir.library.louisville.edu/cardcomp/

Celebration of Student Writing

The Celebration of Student Writing is a one-day showcase of student writing in composition courses at UofL, held in the Spring semester. Students can submit posters, give oral presentations, or participate in poetry readings. The Celebration provides students and instructors an opportunity to exchange ideas about the design choices writers make as they move from rough to revised versions of their work.

A student stands in front of her Business Writing proposal poster at the 2014 SymposiumA line of posters at the 2014 SymposiumInstructors greeting students in Ekstrom at the 2014 Symposium

2017 Celebration of Student Writing

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

10AM-2PM

Location: Ekstrom Library Learning Commons

Questions about 2017 CoSW?

Contact Michelle Day mlday003@louisville.edu or 852-6060.

2016 Celebration of Student Writing

*Now with a new name to CELEBRATE student writing*

Composing Communities: Writing Across Media and Cultures

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

10AM-2PM

Location: Ekstrom Library Learning Commons

Questions about 2016 CoSW?

Contact: Travis Rountree

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2015 Symposium on Student Writing

Write, Invent, Innovate

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

10AM-2PM

Location: Ekstrom Library Learning Commons

To take a look at some examples of Student Symposiums at other institutions click on the links below:

University of New Mexico

Eastern Michigan University

Appalachian State University

For further information about the Symposium take a look at this powerpoint

Questions about 2015 SoSW?

Contact: Travis Rountree

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2014 Symposium on Student Writing

 

Sponsored by the University of Louisville’s Composition Program and Ekstrom Library Learning Commons
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
10:00am—2:00pm

***New Location: Ekstrom Library Learning Commons***
Write. Search. Discover.

All writers search and discover as they uncover what it is they want to say. In the 2014 Symposium, we want to showcase all of the ways in which students use writing as a tool to search and discover. Thus, in our new and expanded format, through poster presentations, oral presentations, and reading their creative writing, we invite students to participate in showcasing their work. Through these multiple formats, we will display the important place that searching and discovering plays in rhetorically effective writing. All types of projects are welcome and we encourage instructors to craft assignments that fit the needs of their class. We look forward to showcasing the work from students in the Composition Program at the University of Louisville in the 2014 Symposium on Student Writing.


Poster Session

Students are invited to design poster presentations that demonstrate the role that searching and discovering plays in the construction of a specific writing project. Poster projects are encouraged to be displayed on tri-fold boards or foam poster boards. We hope to display the posters in the Ekstrom Library Learning Commons before and after the Symposium. Digital posters are also welcome. However, the student must be present while the digital poster is displayed.

Oral Presentation Session

Students are invited to work individually or in groups to design presentations of their work. Presentations may explore the process of searching and discovering that led to the current project.

Creative Writing Reading

Students are invited to share their creative work during the Symposium. Readings lasting between 15 and 20 minutes will be shared in the Bingham Poetry Room. Students interested in participating should email Hollye at hnwrig01@louisville.edu by 5:00pm on Friday March 7th. 

Questions about 2014 SoSW?

Contact Hollye Wright 

 

The 2013 Symposium on Student Writing

The Art of Remix
March 27, 2013
Sponsored by the University of Louisville Composition Program

We live in a world of remix, a world where texts, sounds, images, and ideas are created and recreated, mixed and remixed, so that they can be seen and understood in new forms, new places, and new directions. In writing, the idea of remix is at the heart of the revision process because to remix something is to encourage writers and readers alike to re-see it. In the 2013 Symposium on Student Writing, we want to showcase remix as an important and viable way to understand not only the revision process but also the importance of the rhetorical choices writers need to make when trying to convey any message (in any form) to a target audience. Thus, we are calling for student presentations from writing classes across the university that illustrate the various forms remix can take in student writing and the skills students use and learn when remixing their written work. Through these presentations, we will showcase the important place remix holds in writing courses across the curriculum and the complex rhetorical skills that are exercised through the act of re-envisioning a piece of written work.
Presentations for the symposium may take the form of videos, podcasts, posters, PowerPoint and Prezi presentations, songs, or any other format that lends itself to illustrating the art of remix.

Sample Projects

Examples of projects that meet the symposium theme include presentations that:
  • Highlight and comment upon the changes writers made in moving from their original written piece to a remixed product. Such presentations could focus on the way that the writer’s growing understanding of genre conventions or audience influenced the remix.
  • Illustrate how the elements of reasoning or intellectual standards of critical thinking influenced a writer’s remix choices.
  • Make visible the social dimensions of remixing by emphasizing the roles that other individuals—including peer commentators, instructors, other authors the writer has cited, other audiences—have played in shaping the design of the project.
  • Reflect on the design choices that writers made as they “translated” a project from one medium to another or reinterpreted the same content for different audiences. For instance, a project might highlight the design choices made as a traditional print text was translated into a website or a multimodal composition.
Questions? Email Barrie at barrie.olson@louisville.edu. Also, visit the blog listed above for resources and ideas.

Courses

The Student Learning Outcomes Statements for are intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of each course. The student learning outcomes, which were created through the participation of instructors in the Composition Program, are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the student learning  outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

English 101 (Intro to College Writing)

English 101 focuses on recognizing and responding to different rhetorical situations and developing effective writing processes. A student writer in English 101 should expect to: create and revise works in multiple genres; establish a clear purpose and sense of his or her presence and position in each work; and compose the equivalent of 18 - 20 pages of text over the course of the semester.


Student Learning Outcomes for English 101:

Rhetorical Knowledge
Students will produce writing that responds appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations. Their writing should:

  • Focus on a clear and consistent purpose

  • Analyze and respond to the needs of different audiences

  • Employ a tone consistent with purpose and audience

  • Use a variety of genres or adapt genres to suit different audiences and purposes

  • Choose evidence and detail consistent with purpose and audience

  • Recognize the utility of digital technologies for composition

 

Critical Reading and Thinking
Students will produce writing that abstracts, synthesizes, and represents the ideas of others fairly. Their writing should:

  • Summarize argument and exposition of a text accurately

  • Demonstrate awareness of the role of genre in the creation and reception of texts

  • Provide an understanding of knowledge as existing within a broader context, including the

  • purpose(s) and audience(s) for which a text may have been constructed

  • Incorporate an awareness of multiple points of view

  • Show basic skills in identifying and analyzing electronic sources, including scholarly library databases, the web, and other official databases

 

    Processes
    Students will produce writing reflective of a multi-stage composing and revising process. Their writing should:

    • Reflect a recursive composing process across multiple drafts

    • Illustrate multiple strategies of invention, drafting, and revision

    • Show evidence of development through peer review and collaboration

     

      Conventions
      Students will produce writing that strategically employs appropriate conventions in different writing situations. Their writing should:

      By the end of English 101, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

      • Use structural conventions such as organization, formatting, paragraphing, and tone

      • Demonstrate control of such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling

      • Provide an understanding of the conventions of multimodal composition that comprise developing communication in the 21st century

       

        Ownership
        In fulfilling the above outcomes, students will take ownership of their work and recognize themselves as writers who:

        • Have a growing understanding of their own voice, style, and strengths

        • Demonstrate confidence in their writing through frequent drafts

        • Can articulate their own positions relative to those of others

         

        Adopted November 2014

        English 102 (Intermed. College Writing)

         

          English 102 focuses on creating and answering questions through research and writing using academic sources, both primary and secondary. A student in English 102 should expect to: develop and answer research questions; articulate a position relative to others on a topic; address audiences inside and outside the academic community; and compose, revise, and edit multiple assignments equaling about 20 to 25 pages of text, including at least one extended research project.

           

          Rhetorical Knowledge

          Students will produce writing that responds appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations. Their writing should:

          • Articulate a purpose for research and their own position relative to the positions of others
          • Analyze the needs of an audience and the requirements of the assignment or task
          • Adapt an argument to a variety of genres and media to suit different audiences and purposes
          • Use evidence appropriate to audience and purpose

           

          Critical Thinking and Reading

          Students will produce writing that abstracts, synthesizes, and represents the ideas of others fairly. Their writing should:

          • Use evidence that responsibly represents other research and communities in and beyond the classroom
          • Demonstrate an understanding of a text as existing within a broader context, with a distinct audience and purpose
          • Represent and respond to multiple points of view in research and across community and cultural issues
          • Select academic and nonacademic sources with discernment

           

          Community Issues and Cultural Diversity

          Students will produce writing that communicates an understanding of how communities and cultural categories are constructed.  Their writing should:

          • Demonstrate awareness of multiple points of view
          • Question existing assumptions about culture and community
          • Describe actions being taken to address cultural and community issues
          • Address concerns of diverse audiences

           

          Processes

          Students will produce writing reflective of a multi-stage composing and revising process. Their writing should:

          • Use sources to discover and develop research questions and/or projects
          • Reflect recursive composing processes and strategies across multiple drafts and research assignments
          • Show evidence of research development through peer review and collaboration
          • Evaluate the credibility and relevance of both print and digital sources

           

          Conventions

          Students will produce writing that strategically employs appropriate conventions in different writing situations. Their writing should:

          • Use structural conventions such as organization, formatting, paragraphing, and tone
          • Demonstrate control of surface features such as grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Provide an understanding of the conventions of multimodal composition (in print and/or digital media) that comprise developing communication in the 21st century
          • Cite the work of others appropriately=

          Adopted Spring 2015

          English 105 (Honors Composition)

          English 105 is an honors course that satisfies both the English 101 and English 102 requirements. To enroll in the course, incoming first-year students must have an ACT composite score of 28 or higher or the equivalent SAT score of 1240 (composite math and verbal scores) and a high school grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Because English 105 is the only first-year writing course honors students are required to take, it needs to cover the rhetorical and writing process concerns of English 101 as well as the writing with research concerns of English 102. Instructors teaching English 105 should also review the Student Learning Outcomes for English 101 and English 102. A student in English 105 should expect to write and revise essays in multiple genres, each with a clear purpose and sense of the writer’s presence and position. The student should also expect to create and answer questions through research and writing that draws upon written texts and other sources. A student in English 105 can expect to write four to six papers during the term, including at least one extended research essay, totaling about 20 to 25 pages of text.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 105:

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Focuses on a clear and consistent purpose
          • Analyzes and responds to the needs of different audiences
          • Employs a tone consistent with purpose and audience
          • Uses a variety of genres or adapts genres to suit different audiences and purposes, including writing with research sources
          • Chooses detail and evidence, including evidence from research sources, consistent with purpose and audience

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates awareness of the role of genre in making meaning from a given text
          • Demonstrates understanding of knowledge and information, including information from research sources, as existing within a broader context
          • Represents and responds to multiple points of view, including the positioning of research sources

          Processes

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Identifies a research question and develops a research strategy
          • Identifies, evaluates, and uses research sources to discover and focus a thesis
          • Demonstrates through reflection awareness of their own writing processes across multiple drafts
          • Demonstrates strategies of invention, drafting, and revision
          • Demonstrates ability to critique own work and work of peers

          Conventions

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control over conventions of format and presentation for different purposes and different audiences
          • Demonstrates control of such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Uses conventions of structure and format appropriate to the rhetorical situation, including purposes and conventions of documentation and multiple methods of citation

          English 303 (Scientific & Technical Writing)

          The focus of English 303 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in scientific and technical discourse communities. A student in English 303 should expect to create and revise documents in multiple genres. Each document should establish a clear purpose, sense of audience awareness, and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 303 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          Student Learning Outcomes Statement for English 303:

          The Student Outcomes Statement for English 303 is intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of this course. The student learning outcomes are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the student learning outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing and use oral communication skills that

          • Demonstrate knowledge of audience, which includes the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, technical vocabulary and detail, and tone when writing for both technical and non-technical audiences
          • Demonstrate knowledge of context, which includes analyzing professional cultures, social contexts, and audiences to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of writing
          • Demonstrate an ability to use, explain and integrate quantitative information with verbal prose to achieve particular rhetorical purposes
          • Demonstrate knowledge of research methods that produce professional documents, including analyzing professional contexts and assessing and summarizing information resources

          Processes

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates knowledge of the writing process, which means engaging various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents that respond effectively and ethically to scientific and technical situations and audiences
          • Demonstrates knowledge of collaborative strategies, such as writing in a team setting, working and communicating on-line, setting and achieving project goals, and responding constructively to peers’ work

          Conventions

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate technical vocabulary, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar
          • Demonstrates knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs and integrate a variety of written, visual, and oral elements of design

          English 306 (Business Writing)

          The focus of English 306 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in the professional world. A student in English 306 should expect to create and revise documents that incorporate elements of critical thinking as well as demonstrate intellectual and professional standards of effective communication. A student in English 306 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          By the end of English 306, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Appropriately responds to specific business writing situations with an understanding of context, purpose, and audience
          • Reflects an analysis of workplace problems and proposes clear, precise, and innovative solutions for a specific audience
          • Incorporates accurate and relevant evidence that supports well-reasoned solutions to workplace problems with a depth and breadth of significant, well-researched information
          • Demonstrates the ability to consider co-workers' perspectives with intellectual fairness, empathy, and humility
          • Adheres to professional standards and conventions of business communication genres such as letters, reports and resumes
          • Indicates the perseverance to revise writing to achieve clarity, precision, and appropriate tone, considering multiple perspectives and sensitivity to cultural differences
          • Incorporates a knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs
          • Reflects a control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar.

           

          English 309 (Inquiries into Writing)

          Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or 105

          Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in
          written communication (WR).

          The focus of English 309 is recognizing differing rhetorical situations and responding to them at an advanced level in appropriate modes for diverse audiences. A student in English 309 should expect to create and revise compositions in multiple genres. Compositions should establish a clear purpose, exhibit audience awareness, and reveal a sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 309 should expect to complete four to six projects of their own design. Themes may vary per section as determined by the instructor.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 309:

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to compose texts and presentations that

          • Develop and negotiate an advanced rhetorical situation
          • Integrate and are informed by their own multiple literacies
          • Exhibit awareness of audience, including the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, and tone for a public text or particular discipline
          • Exhibit knowledge of context, which includes analyzing discourse communities to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of composing

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Evidence skill in reading and understanding texts that draw from multiple literacies
          • Indicate knowledge of research methods by analyzing social contexts, assessing the validity of sources, and summarizing and evaluating relevant information
          • Result from designing their own research projects by identifying questions, developing strategies, using primary and secondary sources to support arguments, and choosing effective methods of presentation
          • Acknowledge the complexity of issues by engaging and evaluating multiple points of view

          Processes

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Use writing as a tool for exploration and reflection
          • Employ strategies for composing as a recursive process of inventing, investigating, shaping, drafting, revising, and editing
          • Exhibit the ability to work collaboratively, including in-class, online, and in individual projects
          • Evidence the ability to reflect on their individual writing processes
          • Exhibit an awareness of the communicative options available for any project, text, or composition and make composing choices accordingly

          Conventions

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Indicate awareness of various modes of presentation and ability

          to select the mode(s) most appropriate to the audience and purpose

          • Address the expectations of readers in specific disciplines or public audiences by presenting ideas in appropriate language, format, and citation style

          The E-Files

          The E-Files is a teaching resource for instructors in the English Department at the University of Louisville. This site allows you to search for policy statements, syllabi, assignments and student papers for any English class taught through UofL, to join in online discussions about teaching, and to find links to other relevant information.

          E-Files

          Search for policy statements, syllabi, discussion notes and other course documents.

          Wiki Discussion

          Link to the Composition Program wiki where instructors can discuss recent articles related to the teaching of composition and the composition profession at large.

          Pedagogy Workshops

          Videos of past pedagogy workshops and information on upcoming workshops.

          Other Resources

          Full list of Composition Program Instructor Resources.

          Syllabus Checklist

          Click here to download a Word file of the syllabus checklist.


          The following information should be included in your syllabus. Information with text already provided, such as the Official Course Name or General Education statements, needs to have that text included verbatim. Please return a copy of this document with the required information checked off, as well as the page numbers for where that information is located either to ADCQuery@louisville.edu or a printed copy to the Composition Program Office, HM 321.

           


          Pg #

          Item that must be included:

           

           

          Name of Instructor

           

           

          Official Course Name:

          English 101:  Introduction to College Writing

          English 102: Intermediate College Writing

          English 105:  Advanced Composition for Freshmen

          English 306:  Business Writing

          English 309:  Inquiries in Writing

           

           

          Course number and section

           

           

          Year and term

           

           

          Office room number (and carrel # if applicable)

           

           

          Office hours

          *Two hours per week for one section and four hours for two ore more sections.  Summer teaching requires three hours per week.  It is a good practice to explicitly indicate that students may make appointments for other times.

          NOTE: See further information in the OFFICE HOURS section of handbook.  Also see information on STUDENT CONFERENCES.

           

           

          Phone and e-mail address

           

           

          Course goals/ course description

          *Provide an overview of the design of your course.  Explain the relationships of writing and reading assignments and other activities to the overall purpose and goals of the course.

          NOTE: Further info on Assignment Sheets in the GRADING CRITERIA handbook section.

          *Must include student learning outcomes found here: http://louisville.edu/english/composition/101-and-102-outcomes.html

           

           

          General overview of required work

          *Provide a brief description of formal writing assignments, informal writing, participation, and any other work.  Indicate the percentage each contributes to the final grade.

           

           

          Course prerequisites/ placement criteria

          English 101:  Open to all incoming students

          English 102:  Eng. 101, approved transfer credit for Eng. 101, or Portfolio Placement.

          English 105: Open only to qualified students who have been notified of eligibility.

          English 303: Eng. 102 or 105

          English 306: Eng. 102 or 105

          English 309: Eng. 102 or 105

          NOTE: See further information on placement and ESL in the FAQ section of handbook.

           

           

          Texts and materials

           

           

          Grading policy

          *In addition to your policy, inform students that English courses are graded on a plus/minus scale. If you use a numerical system to calculate grades, please use the following scale.

          A+     100-97        A    96-93         A-    92-90

          B+       89-87        B     86-83         B-    82-80

          C+       79-77        C     76-73         C-    72-70

          D+       69-67        D     66-63         D-    62-60

          F          59 and below

           

           

          General schedule of all major due dates

          *The hard copy of the syllabus must contain due dates for major writing assignments (drafts and final manuscripts or portfolios). Individual daily reading and short writing assignments may be posted on Blackboard as long as that is stated on the hard copy of the syllabus.

           

           

          Attendance Statement

          *Provide students with information of how attendance will affect their grades.  Instructors are not required to factor attendance in calculating a student’s grade, but if they do, it must be in accordance with the Composition Program’s attendance police.

          NOTE:  See further information in the section of handbook on EXCUSED ABSENCES FOR UNIVERSITY-SANCTIONED EVENTS and CLASS ATTENDANCE.

           

           

          Late work policy

          *Provide students with your policy for turning in and grading late work.

           

           

          General education statement(for English 101, English 102, and English 105)

          This course fulfills a General Education Written Communication Requirement.

           

           

          Written communication statement(for English 303, English 306, and English 309)

          Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

           

           

          Title IX/Clery Act Notification

          Sexual misconduct (including sexual harassment, sexual assault, and any other nonconsensual behavior of a sexual nature) and sex discrimination violate University policies.  Students experiencing such behavior may obtain confidential support from the PEACC Program (852-2663), Counseling Center (852-6585), and Campus Health Services (852-6479). To report sexual misconduct or sex discrimination, contact the Dean of Students (852-5787) or University of Louisville Police (852-6111). 

          Disclosure to University faculty or instructors of sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, or sex discrimination occurring on campus, in a University-sponsored program, or involving a campus visitor or University student or employee (whether current or former) is not confidential under Title IX.  Faculty and instructors must forward such reports, including names and circumstances, to the University’s Title IX officer.

          For more information, see the Sexual Misconduct Resource Guide

          (http://louisville.edu/hr/employeerelations/sexual-misconduct-brochure).

           

           

          Right to make changes statement

          The instructor has the right to make changes to the course schedule/syllabus if necessary.

           

           

          Direct Students to Blackboard for:

          Plagiarism Statement

          The University defines plagiarism as “representing the words or ideas of someone else as one’s own in any academic exercise.” Thus, all writing you do for this course must be your own and must be exclusively for this course, unless the instructor stipulates differently. Please pay special attention to the quotes, paraphrases, and documentation practices you use in your papers. If you have any questions about plagiarism, please ask your instructor. If you plagiarize, your instructor reserves the right to grant you a failure for the course and your case may be reported to the College of Arts and Sciences.

          NOTE: Please see further information in the PLAGIARISM section in the composition handbook.

          Statement on behalf of students with disabilities

          Students who have a disability or condition which may impair their ability to complete assignments or otherwise satisfy course criteria are encouraged to meet with the instructor to identify, discuss and document any feasible instructional modifications or accommodations. Please inform instructor about circumstances no later than the second week of the semester or as soon as possible after a disability or condition is diagnosed, whichever occurs earliest. For information and auxiliary assistance, contact the Disabilities Resource Center.

          Grievance procedure statement

          Students who have questions or concerns about their grades, the class, or an assignment are encouraged to see their instructor as soon as possible. If not satisfied with that discussion, students may see an assistant director of composition, Hum 319F, 852-5919.



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          Digital Writing Pedagogy

          Pedagogical Support Services for Digital Writing Resources


          The Composition Program offers several kinds of support services for instructors teaching writing with digital technology.

          • Scheduling of Computer Classrooms: Instructors can schedule use of the two computer classrooms in the Humanities Building (LL 015 and 104) by e-mailing Linda Baldwin at llbald01@louisville.edu . Computer classrooms may be reserved for specific days, specific dates, or for an entire semester. Scheduling is done on a first-come, first-served basis. Many instructors are eager to teach in these classrooms, making them a scarce resource. We ask instructors to do their best to share this resource by only scheduling time in the classrooms for which the computers are a pedagogical necessity.
            • Digital Writing Classroom Schedule for: Fall 2016     (Check with Linda Baldwin.)
            • Digital Writing Classroom Schedule for: Spring 2017 (Check with Linda Baldwin.)
          • Pedagogy Workshops: We offer periodic workshops on digital writing pedagogy. These workshops are announced in the weekly Composition News email. If you have a particular issue you would like addressed in a workshop please let us know.
          • Instructor Support: The Assistant Directors of Composition are available to help instructors with questions about how best to use digital writing resources in Composition Program courses. Simply contact the ADCs with a description of the kind of classroom work you would like to accomplish and they will schedule a time to work with you (ADCQuery@louisville.edu).


          If you have other questions about the Composition Program’s Digital Writing Resources, contact the Assistant Directors of Composition or the Director of Composition.

           

          .

          Program Handbook

           

           

          Department of Composition Handbook

          UNIVERSITY of LOUISVILLE

          COMPOSITION PROGRAM HANDBOOK

          Revised April 2020 

          Table of Contents

           

          Welcome to the Composition Program at UofL

          Program Contacts: Where Do I Go For Help and Information?

          1. How Do We Approach Teaching Writing At UofL?

          2. Course Policies: What Should Be In My Syllabus?

          3. Nuts and Bolts: What Do I Need To Know To Get Through The Semester?

          4. Teacher Resources: How Can I Be A More Effective Teacher?

          5. FAQ: What Else Might I Need To Know?

           

          Appendix A: University Contacts

          Appendix B: How to Access Course Rosters

          Appendix C: How to Post Final Grades

          Appendix D: Classroom Disruption Policy

          Appendix E: College Attendance Policy

          Appendix F: University Excused Absence Policy

          Appendix G: College Statement of Academic Discipline

          Appendix H: Policy Against the Use of Plagiarism Detection Software

          Appendix I: Frequently Asked Questions about Senate Bill 1


          Welcome to the Composition Program at UofL!

          UNIVERSITY of LOUISVILLE

          Composition Program

          June 2020


          Dear Composition Instructors:

          Welcome to the University of Louisville Composition Program. We are committed to teaching students to become more creative and critical writers and readers. Our writing courses are our opportunity to help students develop their writing as a way of thinking, learning, and communicating in ways that will enrich their lives in the University community and beyond.

          The Composition Program is also committed to providing instructors with the support and materials to allow them to become the most effective teachers and scholars possible. We do not work from a single syllabus or textbook. Instead we believe that the strength of the program comes from the creativity of individuals engaging in thoughtful, reflexive teaching practices. Toward that end we provide professional development in the form of periodic teacher workshops, online resources such as E-Files, and the Bonnie Endowment Library of books on literacy, rhetoric, and teaching writing.

          We are here to help you in any way possible. Please don’t hesitate to talk with any of us about any question, problem, idea, or suggestion you have. We are proud of our teachers and program. We hope this year will be productive and enjoyable for you and your students.

          Sincerely,


          Andrea Olinger

          Lauren Fusilier

          Brittany Smart

          Dakoda Smith

           

          PROGRAM CONTACTS

          Where Do I Go For Help and Information?

           

          Dr. Andrea Olinger, Director of Composition (starting 7/2019)

          Humanities 321, 852.6896

           

           

          Linda Baldwin, Composition Program Administrative Specialist

          Humanities 315C 852.6896

           

          Lauren Fusilier, Assistant Director of Composition

          Humanities 333, 852.6060

           

          Brittany Smart, Assistant Director of Composition 

          Humanities 333, 852.6060

           

          Dakoda Smith, Assistant Director of Composition 

          Humanities 333, 852.6060

           

          Dr. Bronwyn Williams, Professor & Director of Writing Center

          Office: Ekstrom Library 132 (Writing Center), 852-2173

           

          Cassie Book, Associate Director of Writing Center

          Ofiice: Ekstrom Library 132 (Writing Center), 852-2206

           

          CHAPTER 1

          How Do We Approach Teaching Writing at UofL?

          Director of Composition

          These are some of the questions about teaching philosophy that are often on the minds of instructors new to the UofL Composition Program. The answers do not attempt to be exhaustive, but instead introduce you to the ongoing conversation we have about teaching writing at UofL. Many of the thoughts on these pages are complex issues that we will talk about at length in English 602, in teaching workshops, and in casual conversations in the hallways. These questions and answers are also not intended to get at the nuts and bolts of how the program works, most of which can be found in other sections of the Handbook. As with all information in the program, never hesitate to ask members of the Composition Program staff any questions you have.

          What is the philosophy for teaching writing at UofL?

           

          We are committed to teaching students to become more creative and critical writers and readers. Our writing courses are our opportunity to help students develop their writing as a way of thinking, learning, and communicating in ways that will enrich their lives in the University community and beyond. In our writing courses we want students to learn how to negotiate and write in unfamiliar writing situations. No set of writing courses could possibly predict the variety of writing challenges that students will encounter in college and in their daily lives. We want students to develop the ability to encounter a new writing situation, in or out of the classroom, and be able to think about it rhetorically in terms of audience, purpose, style and voice, persona and ethos, and so on, so they can figure out how to write effectively in that situation. Accomplishing this goal requires that students write and read in multiple genres and learn to think about writing and reading as rhetorical acts. Students should receive thoughtful and engaged responses to their writing and learn multiple strategies for invention and revision. Most important students should be taught how to reflect on their writing, both in process and as a final product. Such analysis not only allows students to consider their strengths and weaknesses as writers, but offers them approaches to thinking about their writing processes and rhetorical strategies as life-long learners.

           

          Is there a single syllabus?

           

          We do not work from a single syllabus or textbook. Instead we believe that the strength of the program comes from the creativity of individuals engaging in thoughtful, reflexive teaching practices. The entire program benefits when individual teachers have the freedom to attempt innovative practices and assignments, and then share those successful innovations with their colleagues.  Instructors teaching for the first time and enrolled in English 602 will follow the common syllabus.

          Do we teach formulas such as the five-paragraph theme or the “modes of discourse”?

          We do not teach rigid formulas for essays such as the five-paragraph theme, nor do we teach the “modes of discourse” (narration, description, comparison and contrast, etc) as fixed models of essays. Students, in encountering these approaches, learn to think of writing as inflexible and formulaic and are ill-prepared to handle the complexity of the genres they will encounter in their writing lives. Of course teaching description or comparison as a rhetorical strategy within an essay may be useful. In talking about genres, however, students need to see how conventions shape genres, how genres change with rhetorical contexts, and how any given piece of writing is apt to include a number of different strategies.

          What is the difference between English 101 and English 102?

          English 101 is the course most incoming first-year students take in the fall. The focus of the course is on helping students understand how to write essays in which they have to establish an authorial position or presence, whether it is a personal essay or a more traditional argument. We find that our students have some experience in writing narratives or report-oriented prose, but have more trouble in writing essays that take a position and include significant analysis or critique. This is the case for personal essays and argumentative essays. In English 101 we want students to learn how to frame and develop a position through invention and drafting strategies, support their focus with detailed examples and evidence, and learn how to engage in thoughtful and substantive revision. We also want English 101 students to work with and reflect on their writing processes to make them more aware of how they write most effectively and how they negotiate unfamiliar writing situations. The emphasis in English 101 is not research. We do, however, like to have students write at least one essay in which they have to work with a text (say in responding to a reading, etc) so they begin to understand how and why one works with source material.

          Most students take English 102 in the spring and it focuses more on research writing. The goal is to teach students how to develop a question, find information to answer it online, in the library, and through direct research, read and evaluate the research, and develop the information into an argument supported by the relevant evidence. Consequently English 102 requires working with students on how to find research sources and then read those sources rhetorically and evaluate their content. We then work with students on how to develop an argument from those sources and then use them to support the argument. The same philosophy that guides English 101 – of focusing on rhetorical awareness, writing in multiple genres, taking and supporting a position, and reflecting on writing and writing processes – guides our work in English 102.

          What kinds of writing assignments do people typically use in English 101 and 102?

          While there are a wide variety of assignments people use in these courses, often finding innovative and creative ways of trying new strategies, there are some kinds of assignments that are relatively popular. In general assignments in 101 and 102 are non-fiction and are usually oriented toward argument and analysis. Still, there is room for much variety in assignments. Many instructors, for example, use some kind of Literacy Narrative or Autobiography in their courses. Such assignments not only help instructors have a better sense of where students are as readers and writers, but they offer useful opportunities for students to reflect on the variety of their literacy practices and analyze how they have been influenced by the people and culture around them. Other instructors assign students essays that engage current political topics of either national or local relevance. Other instructors have students write personal essays that ask students to reflect on their experiences in some depth. Some assignments ask students to engage in interviews or observations, others to do archival research in either the UofL Library or the local historical society. Finally, multimodal assignments are becoming increasingly common in these courses. More information and sample assignments can be found in several places in the program, including E-Files, the Composition Program office, through the Assistant Directors, in teaching workshops, and in English 602. For more information about ideas for writing assignments, see Chapter Four.

          The other question that often arises in terms of writing assignments is whether explicitly personal writing is allowed or required. The answer to the first question is, yes, explicitly personal writing is allowed. Writing that draws on experience can be personally engaging and rhetorically effective, whether in the form of a literacy narrative, a personal essay, or as support in more traditional arguments. Students who learn how to use personal writing effectively are that much more flexible and creative as writers. In addition, it is worth noting that all writing is “personal”, it is just that writing that does not explicitly acknowledge the presence of the writer allows the reader to assume a particular default authorial identity.

          We want students to consider how best to establish an authorial position in any piece of writing and whether including writing from experience will best help communicate their ideas. The answer to the second question of whether such writing is required, however, is no. Instructors are not required to create assignments that include explicitly personal writing.

          Do instructors in the program hold individual writing conferences with students?

          Yes. There is a strong commitment in this program to individual writing conferences. We believe that the kind of individual response and dialogue that takes place in a writing conference is simply not replicable in written responses on student essays. It is important to be able to talk with students about their writing and their writing processes. It is also important that the writing conference be a true dialogue, not just a mini-lecture to the student about the mistakes in the paper. The purpose of a writing conference is for the student to begin to identify the places a paper needs work, to become a more reflective and effective writer.

          Of course, given teaching loads and the other work obligations it is usually not possible to hold conferences with students as often as any of us would like. Still, most instructors have individual writing conferences with students three or four times a semester. It is acceptable to cancel classes during the week you hold conferences, though instructors often create out-of-class assignments for the students during those weeks. There are many different ways to approach conferences, which you will talk about in English 602 or that you can ask colleagues or ADCs about. Don Murray’s A Writer Teaches Writing has a particularly good chapter on conference strategies. There are also ideas in books in the Bonnie Endowment Library.

          Do instructors use student peer-review writing workshops in writing courses?

          Yes, most instructors have students engage in some kind of peer-review writing workshops at several points during the semester. Students who can identify and respond well to the writing of others become better writers themselves as well as provide useful responses to their peers’ drafts. Instructors use peer-review workshops for a variety of purposes in the semester, from brainstorming ideas, to developing focuses for essays, to responding to drafts, to final editing. There are many different ways to approach peer-review workshops as well, which you will talk about in English 602 or that you can ask colleagues or ADCs about. There are also ideas in books in the Bonnie Endowment Library.

          How is grading approached?

          Most of the instructors here have students compile some kind of final portfolio of their writing that includes finished essays, earlier drafts, and reflective essays. It is not a requirement of the program to use a portfolio-based grading system, however. What is most important is that grading criteria and processes are made clear to students and then applied consistently. We encourage instructors to talk with students about how and why particular grading criteria are established as an ongoing part of the course. We do ask that students receive some sense of how they stand with their grade in the course, whether a brief portfolio, a graded essay, a progress report with a grade, before the course withdrawal deadline. For more information on grading and portfolios, see Chapter Two.

          How do we approach teaching grammar and style?

          We believe that issues of style and grammar are best taught in the context of students’ own writing. Students who work on grammar worksheets can get quite adept at completing grammar worksheets without the knowledge translating into better writing. We approach the teaching of style and grammar as a rhetorical concept that is an ongoing concern in student writing, not just a matter of catching mistakes at the proofreading stage. Consequently we combine in-class work such as commonplace books and style-focused revision exercises with individual work with students on stylistic problems in their drafts. To find resources that would help with teaching issues of grammar and style see Chapter Four.

          Do we have classrooms with computers in them?

          The English Department has two computer-equipped classrooms and a MAC Lab. You may request that your class meet in one of these computer labs.  While we do our best to accommodate these requests, we do have limited space.  Many of our classrooms are equipped with an instructor station and projector.  Technology can also be requested from IT at the following link:

          http://louisville.edu/english/department-filing-cabinet/department-equipment/equipment-request

          How do we help each other with teaching?

          There are several ways that we try to build and sustain a supportive teaching community. First, all instructors new to the UofL classroom are assigned to a small teaching support group with one of the Assistant Directors of Composition, or with me. These offer opportunities for talking about what is happening in your classes, trading teaching ideas, and getting questions large and small answered. You also have the opportunity to go to optional nuts-and-bolts pedagogy lunches to talk about specific pedagogical strategies and assignments for your courses.

          We begin the academic year by having a half-day workshop session the Friday before classes start.

          In addition we have online teaching support in the form of E-Files.  All instructors are encouraged to submit teaching materials to E-Files.

          For more places to find ideas about teaching see Chapter Four.

          Last, but often most important, are the informal conversations about teaching that go on among instructors all the time. Never hesitate to ask for advice or ideas, or just feel free to join in the ongoing talk about teaching.

          CHAPTER 2

          Course Policies: What Should Be In My Syllabus?

          Student Learning Outcomes

          The Student Learning Outcomes Statements for are intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of each course. The student learning outcomes, which were created through the participation of instructors in the Composition Program, are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the student learning  outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

          English 101 (Intro to College Writing)

          The focus of English 101 is recognizing and responding to different rhetorical situations and developing effective writing processes. A student in English 101 should expect to write and revise essays in multiple genres. Each essay should establish a clear purpose and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 101 should expect to write four to six papers during the term totaling about 18-20 pages of text.


          Student Learning Outcomes for English 101:

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 101, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Focuses on a clear and consistent purpose
          • Analyzes and responds to the needs of different audiences
          • Employs a tone consistent with purpose and audience
          • Uses a variety of genres or adapts genres to suit different audiences and purposes
          • Chooses evidence and detail consistent with purpose and audience

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 101, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Identifies the purpose(s) for which a given text may have been constructed
          • Identifies the audience(s) for which a given text may have been constructed
          • Demonstrates awareness of the role of genre in making meaning from a given text
          • Summarizes argument and exposition of a text accurately
          • Demonstrates understanding of knowledge and information as existing within a broader context
          • Demonstrates awareness of multiple points of view

          Processes

          By the end of English 101, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates through reflection awareness of their own writing processes across multiple drafts
          • Demonstrates strategies of invention, drafting, and revision
          • Demonstrates ability to critique own work and work of peers

          Conventions

          By the end of English 101, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates knowledge of genre conventions in terms of organization, formatting, paragraphing, and tone
          • Demonstrates control of such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Uses conventions of structure and format appropriate to the rhetorical situation


          Adopted 11/06

          English 102 (Intermed. College Writing)

          The focus of English 102 is creating and answering questions through research and writing that draws upon written texts and other sources. A student in English 102 should expect to create research questions, find relevant information to answer those questions, and write longer essays that use the information to create and support a clearly defined position on the topic involved. A student in English 102 can expect to write four to six papers during the term, including at least one extended research essay, totaling about 20 to 25 pages of text.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 102:

          Rhetorical Knowledge

          By the end of English 102, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates rhetorical purpose by creating a position relative to their research
          • Analyzes the needs of the audience and the requirements of the assignment or task
          • Demonstrates knowledge of genres employed in writing with research
          • Provides supporting evidence from research sources
          • Employs a tone consistent with purpose and audience

          Critical Thinking and Reading

          By the end of English 102, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Identifies rhetorical strategies and summarizes main ideas of outside sources
          • Places sources in context with other research
          • Represents and responds to multiple points of view in research

          Processes

          By the end of English 102, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Identifies a research question
          • Develops a research strategy
          • Identifies and evaluates sources
          • Uses research sources to discover and focus a thesis

          Conventions

          By the end of English 102, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Integrates sources with one another and with own analysis
          • Demonstrates control over conventions of format and presentation for different purposes and different audiences
          • Demonstrates an understanding of the purposes and conventions of documentation
          • Demonstrates awareness of multiple methods of citation

            Adopted 11/06

          English 105 (Honors Composition)

          English 105 is an honors course that satisfies both the English 101 and English 102 requirements. To enroll in the course, incoming first-year students must have an ACT composite score of 28 or higher or the equivalent SAT score of 1240 (composite math and verbal scores) and a high school grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Because English 105 is the only first-year writing course honors students are required to take, it needs to cover the rhetorical and writing process concerns of English 101 as well as the writing with research concerns of English 102. Instructors teaching English 105 should also review the Student Learning Outcomes for English 101 and English 102. A student in English 105 should expect to write and revise essays in multiple genres, each with a clear purpose and sense of the writer’s presence and position. The student should also expect to create and answer questions through research and writing that draws upon written texts and other sources. A student in English 105 can expect to write four to six papers during the term, including at least one extended research essay, totaling about 20 to 25 pages of text.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 105:

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Focuses on a clear and consistent purpose
          • Analyzes and responds to the needs of different audiences
          • Employs a tone consistent with purpose and audience
          • Uses a variety of genres or adapts genres to suit different audiences and purposes, including writing with research sources
          • Chooses detail and evidence, including evidence from research sources, consistent with purpose and audience

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates awareness of the role of genre in making meaning from a given text
          • Demonstrates understanding of knowledge and information, including information from research sources, as existing within a broader context
          • Represents and responds to multiple points of view, including the positioning of research sources

          Processes

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Identifies a research question and develops a research strategy
          • Identifies, evaluates, and uses research sources to discover and focus a thesis
          • Demonstrates through reflection awareness of their own writing processes across multiple drafts
          • Demonstrates strategies of invention, drafting, and revision
          • Demonstrates ability to critique own work and work of peers

          Conventions

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control over conventions of format and presentation for different purposes and different audiences
          • Demonstrates control of such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Uses conventions of structure and format appropriate to the rhetorical situation, including purposes and conventions of documentation and multiple methods of citation

          English 303 (Scientific & Technical Writing)

          The focus of English 303 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in scientific and technical discourse communities. A student in English 303 should expect to create and revise documents in multiple genres. Each document should establish a clear purpose, sense of audience awareness, and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 303 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          Student Learning Outcomes Statement for English 303:

          The Student Outcomes Statement for English 303 is intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of this course. The student learning outcomes are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the student learning outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing and use oral communication skills that

          • Demonstrate knowledge of audience, which includes the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, technical vocabulary and detail, and tone when writing for both technical and non-technical audiences
          • Demonstrate knowledge of context, which includes analyzing professional cultures, social contexts, and audiences to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of writing
          • Demonstrate an ability to use, explain and integrate quantitative information with verbal prose to achieve particular rhetorical purposes
          • Demonstrate knowledge of research methods that produce professional documents, including analyzing professional contexts and assessing and summarizing information resources

          Processes

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates knowledge of the writing process, which means engaging various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents that respond effectively and ethically to scientific and technical situations and audiences
          • Demonstrates knowledge of collaborative strategies, such as writing in a team setting, working and communicating on-line, setting and achieving project goals, and responding constructively to peers’ work

          Conventions

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate technical vocabulary, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar
          • Demonstrates knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs and integrate a variety of written, visual, and oral elements of design

          English 306 (Business Writing)

          The focus of English 306 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in the professional world. A student in English 306 should expect to create and revise documents that incorporate elements of critical thinking as well as demonstrate intellectual and professional standards of effective communication. A student in English 306 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          By the end of English 306, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Appropriately responds to specific business writing situations with an understanding of context, purpose, and audience
          • Reflects an analysis of workplace problems and proposes clear, precise, and innovative solutions for a specific audience
          • Incorporates accurate and relevant evidence that supports well-reasoned solutions to workplace problems with a depth and breadth of significant, well-researched information
          • Demonstrates the ability to consider co-workers' perspectives with intellectual fairness, empathy, and humility
          • Adheres to professional standards and conventions of business communication genres such as letters, reports and resumes
          • Indicates the perseverance to revise writing to achieve clarity, precision, and appropriate tone, considering multiple perspectives and sensitivity to cultural differences
          • Incorporates a knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs
          • Reflects a control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar.

           

          English 309 (Inquiries into Writing)

          Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or 105

          Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in
          written communication (WR).

          The focus of English 309 is recognizing differing rhetorical situations and responding to them at an advanced level in appropriate modes for diverse audiences. A student in English 309 should expect to create and revise compositions in multiple genres. Compositions should establish a clear purpose, exhibit audience awareness, and reveal a sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 309 should expect to complete four to six projects of their own design. Themes may vary per section as determined by the instructor.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 309:

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to compose texts and presentations that

          • Develop and negotiate an advanced rhetorical situation
          • Integrate and are informed by their own multiple literacies
          • Exhibit awareness of audience, including the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, and tone for a public text or particular discipline
          • Exhibit knowledge of context, which includes analyzing discourse communities to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of composing

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Evidence skill in reading and understanding texts that draw from multiple literacies
          • Indicate knowledge of research methods by analyzing social contexts, assessing the validity of sources, and summarizing and evaluating relevant information
          • Result from designing their own research projects by identifying questions, developing strategies, using primary and secondary sources to support arguments, and choosing effective methods of presentation
          • Acknowledge the complexity of issues by engaging and evaluating multiple points of view

          Processes

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Use writing as a tool for exploration and reflection
          • Employ strategies for composing as a recursive process of inventing, investigating, shaping, drafting, revising, and editing
          • Exhibit the ability to work collaboratively, including in-class, online, and in individual projects
          • Evidence the ability to reflect on their individual writing processes
          • Exhibit an awareness of the communicative options available for any project, text, or composition and make composing choices accordingly

          Conventions

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Indicate awareness of various modes of presentation and ability

          to select the mode(s) most appropriate to the audience and purpose

          • Address the expectations of readers in specific disciplines or public audiences by presenting ideas in appropriate language, format, and citation style

          Course Syllabus Guidelines

          Composition Program students should receive a syllabus in the first class meeting and the syllabus must be posted to Blackboard.. A copy, with syllabus checklist (see pages 12-13 of this handbook) completed and attached, for each section taught must be placed on file in the Composition Program office (Humanities Bldg. Room 321) by the end of the first week of each semester. Substantial changes in the syllabus must be communicated to the students in writing and filed in the Composition Program Office.

          The syllabus should contain clear and direct statements of the policies and procedures governing the course. It should also provide a schedule of the course's activities drawn up in detail sufficient to allow the students to know the extent, character, and timing of their work for the term, but not so great as to overwhelm them or to severely limit the instructor's ability to adjust to the realities of a given writing class. The syllabus should not to be confused with daily lesson plans, nor should it take the place of written assignments.  The daily schedule may be maintained on Blackboard and updated unit by unit.  This should be clearly stated on the syllabus.

          Syllabus Checklist

           

          A copy of this checklist can be downloaded and printed from the Composition Program website.

          The following information should be included in your syllabus. Information with text already provided, such as the Disabilities or General Education statements, needs to have that text included verbatim. Please click on "Syllabus Checklist" link above and attach a copy

          of this sheet to your syllabus, with the required information checked off, and page numbers indicated, when you turn a copy in to the Composition Program Office.


          Items that must be included:

          • Name of instructor
          • Official course name:
            • English 101: Introduction to College Writing
            • English 102: Intermediate College Writing
            • English 105: Advanced Composition for Freshmen
            • English 306: Business Writing
            • English 309: Advanced Academic Writing
          • Course number and section
          • Year and term
          • Office room number (and carrel # if applicable)
          • Office hours
            • two hours per week for one section and four hours for two or more sections. Summer teaching requires three hours per week. It is a good practice to explicitly indicate that students may make appointments for other times. NOTE: See further information in the OFFICE HOURS section of handbook. Also see information on STUDENT CONFERENCES.
          • Phone number and e-mail address
          • Course goals/ course description
            • Provide an overview of the design of your course. Explain the relationships of writing and reading assignments and other activities to the overall purpose and goals of the course.

              NOTE: See further information on Assignment Sheets in the GRADING CRITERIA section of handbook.

          • General overview of required work

            *Provide a brief description of the formal writing assignments, informal writing, participation, and any other work. Indicate the percentage each contributes to the final grade.

            • Course prerequisites/ placement criteria
              • English 101: Open to all incoming students
              • English 102: Eng. 101, approved transfer credit for Eng. 101, or Portfolio Placement into 102.
              • English 105: Open only to exceptionally qualified students who have been notified of their
                eligibility.
              • English 303: Eng. 102 or 105
              • English 306: Eng. 102 or 105
              • English 309: Eng. 102 or 105
                NOTE: See further information on placement and ESL in the FAQ section of handbook.
            • Texts and materials
            • Grading policy:
            • Grading policy
              *In addition to your policy, also inform students that English courses are graded on a plus/minus scale. If you use a numerical system to calculate grades, please use the following scale.
              A+ 100-97 A 96-93 A- 92-90
              B+ 89-87 B 86-83 B- 82-80
              C+ 79-77 C 76-73 C- 72-70
              D+ 69-67 D 66-63 D- 62-60
              F 59 and below
            • General schedule of all major due dates
              The hard copy of the syllabus must contain due dates for major writing assignments (drafts and final manuscripts or portfolios). Individual daily reading and short writing assignments may be posted on Blackboard as long as that is stated on the hard copy of the syllabus.
            • Attendance Statement
              Provide students with information of how attendance will affect their grades. Instructors are not required to factor attendance in calculating a student’s grade, but if they do, it must be in accordance with the Composition Program’s attendance policy.
              NOTE: See further information in the section of handbook on
              EXCUSED ABSENCES FOR UNIVERSITY-SANCTIONED
              EVENTS and CLASS ATTENDANCE.
            • Late work policy
              Provide students with your policy for turning in and grading late work
            • General education statement (for English 101, English 102, and English 105)
              This course fulfills a General Education Written Communication Requirement.
            • Written communication statement (for English 303, English 306, and English 309)
              Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR)
            • Right to make changes statement
              The instructor has the right to make changes to the course schedule/syllabus if necessary.
            • Direct students to Blackboard for:

          *These items can be placed on Blackboard as long as the hard copy syllabus explicitly tells students where they can find the policies.

          Statement on behalf of students with disabilities

          Students who have a disability or condition which may impair their ability to complete assignments or otherwise satisfy course criteria are encouraged to meet with the instructor to identify, discuss and document any feasible instructional modifications or accommodations. Please inform instructor about circumstances no later than the second week of the semester or as soon as possible after a disability or condition is diagnosed, whichever occurs earliest. For information and auxiliary assistance, contact the Disabilities Resource Center.

              1. Grievance procedure statement
                Students who have questions or concerns about their grades, the class, or an assignment are encouraged to see their instructor as soon as possible. If not satisfied with that discussion, students may see an assistant director of composition, Hum 319F, 852.5919.
              2. Plagiarism statement
                The University defines plagiarism as “representing the words or ideas of someone else as one’s own in any academic exercise.” Thus, all writing you do for this course must be your own and must be exclusively for this course, unless the instructor stipulates differently. Please pay special attention to the quotes, paraphrases, and documentation practices you use in your papers. If you have any questions about plagiarism, please ask your instructor. If you plagiarize, your instructor reserves the right to grant you a failure for the course and your case may be reported to the College of Arts and Sciences.
                NOTE: Please see further information in the PLAGIARISM section in the composition handbook.

          Teacher Availability/Office Hours 

          During regular fall and spring semesters, instructors who teach two or more sections should post and keep at least four office hours per week. For those teaching one section, the requirement is to post and keep at least two office hours per week. During the ten-week summer term, three office hours per week are required. It is a good practice to indicate that students may make appointments for times other than the office hours posted. It is imperative that an instructor be in the scheduled office at his/her scheduled office hours so that students have adequate access. By accepting a PTL appointment or GTAship, instructors are agreeing to this office hour requirement.

          Communication with Students and Administration

          You will have a university email address, where you will receive important information. You must check this email box regularly. You should also advise students to use this email address to contact you.

          Canceling and Moving Classes

          Instructor Absenteeism Policy
          The English Department expects all instructors to be present at every regularly scheduled course meeting, face to face or on-line, for the full length of the term. However, the Department also
          recognizes that absences may occur due to conference attendance, illness, or personal matters, among other reasons. When an instructor cannot attend one or more classes—either consecutively or separately—the following policies apply:

          • A notification of any absence must be sent by email to Linda Baldwin (or another designated staff member). This notification should be separate from any sent out to students via Blackboard or ULink. Notifications of instructor absence sent to students shall not be considered an adequate substitute for notifications made to office staff.  
          • The department should be told of absences as early as possible (recognizing that in certain circumstances prior notification may not be possible). Notification is unnecessary if the instructor has submitted the university travel forms.
          • If three or more classes are missed, the instructor is to arrange for some form of substitute instruction. The instructor may leave up to two missed class sessions without substitution.
          • Possible options for substitution include, but are not limited to: holding one or more of the missed sessions synchronously online; scheduling one or more additional class sessions to replace those missed; asking a colleague to teach one or more of the missed classes; or assigning the students an independent learning exercise or asynchronous lesson.
          • In a course conducted in person, synchronous online class meetings may be used to substitute for missed classes no more than three times. An independent learning exercise or asynchronous lesson may be used only once.
          • When five or more classes are missed, the instructor is to work with the chair to develop a substitution plan to make up for the missed sessions.
          • Recognizing that courses taught asynchronously online do not necessarily have formal class meetings, absence from student contact for any seven-day period will require a substitution plan comparable to that required for in-person or synchronous classes when an instructor misses three or class sessions. In the case of absences of more than seven days, the instructor is to work with the chair to develop an appropriate substitution plan.

          It is required that you log all planned changes to the routine meeting times and/or locations (or office hours) in the Class Change Roster in Room 315C. Indicate the reason for the change and note where the class will meet if it has been moved. 

          Revision policy

          Recognizing the importance of revision to writing development and the fact that peer feedback has purposes different from those of teacher feedback, in spring 2020 the Composition Program adopted the following teacher feedback and revision policy: All students must have the option to revise at least one project after receiving the teacher’s feedback and/or a grade. We encourage allowing revision on all projects that do not come near the end of the semester. As you craft your policy, consider the following factors:

          • Will you require revision on all major projects or the ones not at the end of the semester, or will you make revision optional for one or more projects?
          • Will you require students to complete any tasks to support their revision? For example, they could submit a cover letter describing the changes they made, attend a writing center consultation, or conference with you about the revision in class or out of class.
          • When will their revision be due? For example, they could submit it at a time of their choice, two weeks after they receive your feedback and/or grade, or at the end of the semester.
          • If you assigned a grade, would the new grade replace the old one, or would it be averaged with the old one?

          Student Conferences

          Effective writing instruction often requires direct communication between teacher and student working on specific writing problems. In view of the congestion in Humanities LL04, it is a common and reasonable practice to hold conferences elsewhere. If you do this during your office hours, please leave a conspicuous note letting other students know where you are, notify the Composition Administrative Assistant, and make the necessary entry in the Class Change Roster in Humanities 321. While in Humanities LL04, please be sensitive to the needs of your colleagues and their students.  The two small conference rooms located in Humanities LL04 can be reserved for conferences using the red binder located on the table with the printer.

          Instructors are encouraged to conference with students throughout the semester.  It is acceptable to cancel up to a week of class for conferences.  Please consider how this interruption to daily class routine will impact students and the classroom environment.  We encourage conference days to be spread out so that students do not miss a solid week of class.

           

          Placement Verification

          If a question arises about whether or not a student is appropriately placed in English 101, 102, or 105, direct the student to see one of the assistant directors in Bingham Humanities, Room 319F, as soon as possible.

          Transfer Students: See FAQ.

          Portfolio Placement: See FAQ. You can also find information on portfolio placement on the English Department Composition website.

          English as a Second Language (ESL): See FAQ.

          Attendance Policy

          Attendance Policy for Composition Program Instructors:

          Composition Program Faculty may use student attendance as grounds for computing student grades.  Instructors may lower a student's grade after she has accumulated two weeks' worth of unexcused absences (six days for a class meeting three times a week or four days for a class meeting twice a week).  An instructor may give a student a failing grade for the course after she has accumulated three weeks' worth of unexcused absences (nine days for a class meeting three times a week or six days for a class meeting twice a week).  These guidelines stipulate the minimum number of unexcused absences an instructor can use in determining student grades.  Each instructor should devise her own attendance/grade policy.

          Class Attendance:

          The following statements outline the attendance policies of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Composition Program of the English Department.

          A&S Attendance Policy Statement:

          Effective Fall 1999, the A&S Faculty Assembly approved the following policy on class attendance.  (This policy does not alter the University-wide policy on excused absences related to approved university activities):

          "Students are expected to attend class.  Instructors who choose to do so may include attendance in determining a student's grade.  Instructors who use attendance as a factor must indicate on their syllabus what their policy is and how attendance will affect the student's grade."

          Excused Absences for University-Sanctioned Events: The following policy is taken from the 2006-08 Student Handbook.

          “On the recommendation of the Faculty Senate, Provost Willihnganz has approved the following guidelines for student absences excused by reason of participation in university-sanctioned events. These guidelines replace the Faculty Senate statement of July 8, 1998 and the revised policy of September 6, 2006..

          “Resolved by the Faculty Senate, September 6, 2006:

          “Although each college, school, or academic unit of the University of Louisville creates its own regulations concerning class attendance, all units hold students responsible for materials covered, lectures given, papers due, exams scheduled, or other evaluative measures administered. The academy requires student participation in the learning process, measurement of student progress, and the fulfillment of basic course requirements.

          “However, because the university recognizes that educational experiences extend beyond the classroom and campus, faculty are expected to be flexible with students who are acting as official representatives of the university, or participating in university-sanctioned events or activities that require absence from class. A university sanctioned event or activity shall be one in which a student represents the university to external constituencies in academic or extra-curricular activities. These include but are not limited to student government congresses, intercollegiate athletic and debate contests, music competitions, academic meetings, and conferences. The deans, the student government association, or faculty sponsors of recognized student organizations may petition the provost to designate other events or categories of events as university-sanctioned.

          “When students’ participation in university-sanctioned events or activities requires them to be absent from a class (or classes) during which an examination or other measurement of academic progress is scheduled, faculty are expected to provide students with opportunities to be evaluated at other times or by comparable alternative evaluation methods within a reasonable period of time prior to or after the absence.

          “Faculty members are expected to provide students in their classes with clear syllabi, including attendance requirements and dates for required measurements or field experiences. Attendance policies should allow excused absences for university-sanctioned events.

          “Students who seek excused absences to attend university-sanctioned events are expected to follow the instructions below, and are expected to complete assignments on time, actively participate in other class sessions, and to make up work missed as agreed upon with the faculty member. Students are expected to attend regularly at other times.

          “Official notice of a university-sanctioned event shall consist of an excused absence request letter from the sponsoring unit or program to the faculty whose class(es) will be missed, delivered by the student. The excused absence letter may request blanket approval for a series of events or approval of a single event. If the event or class of events has not already been designated as university-sanctioned, the letter must be signed by the provost or her/his designee. The letter must be delivered to and received by the faculty member at the beginning of the semester for a series of events or a minimum of one week prior to the event or activity. The letter shall include the following data:

          1. Name, date(s), and location(s) of the event(s).
          2. Date of departure from campus and exact time when the student is expected to report for departure.
          3. Date of return to campus and exact day and time that the student will be expected to return to class.


          “The faculty member will respond in writing. Approval indicates that the instructor will provide opportunities for students to be evaluated at other times or by comparable alternative evaluation methods, within a reasonable period of time prior to or after the absence, without academic penalty.

          “If the letter requests blanket approval at the beginning of the term for a series of absences and the faculty member determines that the absences will seriously compromise the student’s performance in the course, the faculty member may deny the excused absence request within the first week of classes, thereby allowing the student to drop the course and add another. If the letter requests absence from an exam or other evaluative measure later in the term (but at least one week in advance) and the faculty member determines that the requested absence will compromise the student’s performance in the course, the faculty member may deny the excused absence.

          “The student may appeal denial of an excused absence to the provost or the provost’s designee [1]. Students who believe themselves to be penalized by an instructor, either by a disproportionate task to make up missed work or a grade reduction, may also appeal. Reprisals for following the policy or for reporting a failure to follow the policy are prohibited.

          “On occasion, students will not anticipate an absence for a university-sanctioned event until late in the term and will be unable to provide a week’s notice. Such events include but are not limited to post-season tournaments or participation in a regional or national competition. In such instances, the student will provide the faculty member with a letter from the sponsor of the event as soon as the event is scheduled, and the faculty member is asked to be as flexible as possible.

          “The designee for these guidelines is Dr. Dale B. Billingsley, associate university provost for undergraduate affairs (852.5209).”

          Recording Attendance is Required

          Composition program policy requires that instructors record attendance.  Attendance records are always an important consideration if students petition for an administrative withdrawal, seek and incomplete, or file a formal grievance.  Additionally, when entering grades for a student receiving an unearned F "UF," you will also be prompted to enter the student's last date of attendance.  While these are not common occurrences, they are common enough to justify this requirement.  Further, if students know that attendance is taken, they are often nudged into being better academic citizens.  If you find this task cumbersome, consult with one of the assistant directors for some suggestions for taking attendance without unduly disrupting the ecology of your class.

          Grading Criteria

          English 101, 102, 105, 303, and 306 are graded A-F on a plus/minus system. The following general criteria may help you determine grades.

          Syllabi should clearly define grading procedures, indicating the value of writing assignments, process work, and participation in the calculation of the course grade and generally how this work will be rated. Rating criteria for specific assignments should be indicated in the assignment sheets for those projects.

          You should also provide an evaluation of the student's work before the last day to withdraw without academic penalty. The student should have enough information to be able to make an informed decision about continuing or dropping the course.

          For Process Work:

          A+/A/A- Exceptionally thorough, imaginative, thoughtful work; all assignments complete

          B+/B/B- Good work, above and beyond satisfying the basic requirements; all assignments complete

          C+/C/C- Acceptable work; all assignments complete

          D+/D/D- Most assignments complete

          F Few or no assignments complete

          For Participation: The grade of C means showing up and doing the minimum to get by. Grades below C indicate that students have missed workshops and conferences, and have not provided a minimum contribution to workshop groups and to the class. Grades of A and B indicate depth and thoroughness and the student's significant contribution to workshop groups and class discussion as well as successful completion of major assignments.

          Assignments: It is common practice to provide students an assignment sheet for each writing assignment as the course progresses. These sheets define the topic, length, and kind of writing required, the objectives of the assignment, identify the intended audience, and provide any additional guidance that is appropriate. These assignment sheets should also indicate the grading criteria to be applied in the assessment of the assignment.

          Incompletes: If a student requests an incomplete for a course grade, the instructor should contact the Director of Composition.

          Plagiarism: You should discuss plagiarism with your students, particularly as it relates to collaborative learning and writing and the principles of documentation. The Composition Program does not use plagiarism detection software and instead prefers to deal with the issue through effective writing process pedagogy, including good assignment design and individual responses to student writing.

          If you suspect a case of plagiarism, you should notify an ADC and schedule a meeting with the student outside of class. You may request that an ADC be present at this meeting. You should decide how you plan to handle the case before meeting with the student. You should make copies of the plagiarized assignment so that you have a copy for your records. It is helpful to clearly have the source of the material to show to the student. You may also want to print or save the plagiarized source for your records.

          Based on the type of plagiarism, you may select to do one of the following:

          1. Provide the student with the opportunity and specific guidelines to redo the assignment for a reduced grade. If you choose this option, the guidelines should be written out and a copy given to the student and an ADC. This may take the form of an email.
          2. Fail the student for the assignment. If you choose this option, make copies of the assignment and the plagiarized source for your records.
          3. Fail the student for the course and notify the College A & S of the plagiarism. If you choose this option, make copies of the assignment and the plagiarized source for your records.
          An ADC can help you to plan the course of action based on the details of the circumstance.

           

          The following resources are available for further guidance on discussing plagiarism:

          University Writing Center http://breeze.louisville.edu/plagiarism09

           

          Information Literacy http://library.louisville.edu/infoliteracy/

          Statement of Academic Discipline from the College of Arts & Sciences:

          In accordance with The Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities academic dishonesty is prohibited at the University of Louisville. Although cheating and plagiarism have never constituted a major problem, both faculty and students thought it important to express clearly, in advance, the standards to which the College adheres. The Statement of Academic Discipline printed below is the result of their effort and serves as the official statement for the College.

          Questions which do arise are reviewed by a joint student-faculty committee, which advises the student and faculty concerned. Rights of the student to review and appeal are scrupulously observed, and minutes of all meetings are confidential.

          I. Introduction

          As members of the academic community, both students and faculty are expected to recognize and to uphold standards of intellectual integrity. The College assumes as a minimum standard of conduct in academic matters that the student is honest; credit for courses is given and received on the assumption and condition that all work submitted represents the student’s own efforts.

          Unfortunately, cheating and plagiarism do occur. The pressure for grades is often great, and opportunities for dishonesty exist. Nevertheless, both the ideals of scholarship and the need for practices which are fair to all students demand that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit. The definitions and guidelines given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic work is to be measured.

          II. Definitions

          Cheating on examinations consists of any of the following: 1) borrowing someone’s answers; 2) providing answers to someone; 3) using unauthorized materials during the examinations.

          Except when otherwise explicitly stated by the instructor, examination questions shall become public property after they have been given.

          Plagiarism, in submitting individual work for academic evaluation, means simply to borrow someone’s ideas without citing the source, and to use them as one’s own. It is a particular type of cheating. Plagiarism in this sense is not limited to the use of direct quotations without citation; a paraphrase is indebted to the author’s ideas just as a direct quotation is. Nor is plagiarism limited to the use of published materials; borrowing from the written or oral work of others without citation is equally dishonest. On the other hand, in every area of learning there is a body of knowledge which belongs to the public domain. Guidance and experience may be necessary in order to distinguish where the requirement to cite a source no longer applies. The instructor or perhaps a style manual may be helpful in resolving questions about what should be cited.

          III. Guidelines for Instructors

          Instructors have at least two roles to play in maintaining proper standards of academic conduct:

          • to assist their students in recognizing the way in which general standards apply in the context of a particular course or discipline;
          • to take practical steps to prevent cheating and detect it when it occurs. Specific guidelines, several of them obvious, should be followed:
          • That instructors take the time to inform students of the standards of conduct expected of them with regard to assignments and examinations.
          • That practical measures be taken to minimize opportunities for dishonesty; e.g., adequate proctoring, the use of alternate forms of an examination if seating is crowded.
          • The practice of giving identical examinations to different classes, whether separated in time by ten minutes or by a semester, invites cheating. When there are good reasons for such repetition, appropriate security precautions should be taken.
          • The repeated assignment of the same material for papers or homework invites plagiarism. When assignments are repeated, students should be informed that the unauthorized reliance on earlier papers is forbidden and that the instructor has effective means of detecting same.
          • That the instructor specify with regard to assignments the degree to which students may confer and cooperate in achieving answers.
          • The College does not operate on an honor system. If within a particular class an instructor wishes to institute such a system, the students should be clearly informed of their responsibilities.

          IV. Guidelines for Students

          Recognizing his/her responsibility as a member of the academic community, the student should strive to maintain intrinsically honest academic conduct. The student must seek to avoid any action which would compromise academic integrity. To ensure both the fact and the appearance of proper conduct, the student should follow these basic guidelines:

          During examinations, the student must be careful to do nothing that can be construed as cheating.  The student shall follow carefully all directions given by the instructor with regard to taking tests and completing assignments.

          The instructor’s request to keep test questions private shall be honored by the student.

          If the student is aware of practices by the instructor which are conducive to cheating, or of acts of cheating by students, he/she may convey this information either to any member of the student-faculty review committee (see section “V. Procedures”) or directly to the instructor.

          Learning the proper methods of documentation and scholarship is also the student’s responsibility. Such knowledge will help avoid committing plagiarism unwittingly.

          V. Procedures

          As evidence of the seriousness with which the College regards these matters, a student-faculty review committee, the Committee on Academic Discipline, has been established to assist in dealing with violators. The Committee on Academic Discipline exists also to protect the student’s right to a fair and impartial hearing. To ensure its effectiveness, the faculty should view it as the primary channel through which such problems can be resolved. The faculty member who believes a problem of cheating or plagiarism exists should first confront the student or students involved and attempt to resolve the matter. A report of the facts of the case and any decision which was made should be sent by the professor to the Dean or the committee. During this initial encounter the faculty member should inform the student of his/her right to appeal an unfavorable decision to the committee. This committee is comprised of three students, selected by a nominating committee of the Student Council; three faculty members, representing the three divisions of the College, elected by the faculty; and the Dean of the College, ex officio. The committee shall select its own chair. The committee can be convened by notifying either the Dean or the chair that there is a case.

          Written statements shall be made by both parties and made available to both parties and the committee prior to any oral testimony. Any refutations may be made in writing or orally at the hearing. Evidence not submitted in the original written statements will not normally be accepted at the oral hearing.

          All evidence in writing before the committee in a case shall be available to the principals.  The committee shall hear such cases as come before it and allow the student to speak on his or her own behalf and to present evidence and witnesses. Further, the burden of proof rests with the person making the charge.

          The committee is given the responsibility of recommending the penalties for the violator, and such penalties shall be commensurate with both the nature and the seriousness of the case in question. Typically, for the first offense of cheating or plagiarism, failure in the course will be recommended; of course, the instructor retains his/her right to assign the grade. Any subsequent offense may result in a recommendation to the Dean to suspend or dismiss the individual from the College. All final actions taken by the Dean that result from committee recommendations shall be entered in the student’s record.

          The committee may adopt additional principles or procedures as seem appropriate. Such changes, however, should be presented to the faculty for approval.

          Any student who believes the processing or final disposition of a charge of academic dishonesty was unfair may initiate a grievance under the Academic Grievance Procedure as outlined in the General Information section of this catalog.

          Statement of Academic Discipline from the College of Arts & Sciences:

          In accordance with The Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities academic dishonesty is prohibited at the University of Louisville. Although cheating and plagiarism have never constituted a major problem, both faculty and students thought it important to express clearly, in advance, the standards to which the College adheres. The Statement of Academic Discipline printed below is the result of their effort and serves as the official statement for the College.

          Questions which do arise are reviewed by a joint student-faculty committee, which advises the student and faculty concerned. Rights of the student to review and appeal are scrupulously observed, and minutes of all meetings are confidential.

          I. Introduction

          As members of the academic community, both students and faculty are expected to recognize and to uphold standards of intellectual integrity. The College assumes as a minimum standard of conduct in academic matters that the student is honest; credit for courses is given and received on the assumption and condition that all work submitted represents the student’s own efforts.

          Unfortunately, cheating and plagiarism do occur. The pressure for grades is often great, and opportunities for dishonesty exist. Nevertheless, both the ideals of scholarship and the need for practices which are fair to all students demand that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit. The definitions and guidelines given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic work is to be measured.

           

          II. Definitions

          Cheating on examinations consists of any of the following: 1) borrowing someone’s answers; 2) providing answers to someone; 3) using unauthorized materials during the examinations.

          Except when otherwise explicitly stated by the instructor, examination questions shall become public property after they have been given.

          Plagiarism, in submitting individual work for academic evaluation, means simply to borrow someone’s ideas without citing the source, and to use them as one’s own. It is a particular type of cheating. Plagiarism in this sense is not limited to the use of direct quotations without citation; a paraphrase is indebted to the author’s ideas just as a direct quotation is. Nor is plagiarism limited to the use of published materials; borrowing from the written or oral work of others without citation is equally dishonest. On the other hand, in every area of learning there is a body of knowledge which belongs to the public domain. Guidance and experience may be necessary in order to distinguish where the requirement to cite a source no longer applies. The instructor or perhaps a style manual may be helpful in resolving questions about what should be cited.

           

          III. Guidelines for Instructors

          Instructors have at least two roles to play in maintaining proper standards of academic conduct:

          • to assist their students in recognizing the way in which general standards apply in the context of a particular course or discipline;
          • to take practical steps to prevent cheating and detect it when it occurs. Specific guidelines, several of them obvious, should be followed:
          • That instructors take the time to inform students of the standards of conduct expected of them with regard to assignments and examinations.
          • That practical measures be taken to minimize opportunities for dishonesty; e.g., adequate proctoring, the use of alternate forms of an examination if seating is crowded.
          • The practice of giving identical examinations to different classes, whether separated in time by ten minutes or by a semester, invites cheating. When there are good reasons for such repetition, appropriate security precautions should be taken.
          • The repeated assignment of the same material for papers or homework invites plagiarism. When assignments are repeated, students should be informed that the unauthorized reliance on earlier papers is forbidden and that the instructor has effective means of detecting same.
          • That the instructor specify with regard to assignments the degree to which students may confer and cooperate in achieving answers.
          • The College does not operate on an honor system. If within a particular class an instructor wishes to institute such a system, the students should be clearly informed of their responsibilities.

           

          IV. Guidelines for Students

          Recognizing his/her responsibility as a member of the academic community, the student should strive to maintain intrinsically honest academic conduct. The student must seek to avoid any action which would compromise academic integrity. To ensure both the fact and the appearance of proper conduct, the student should follow these basic guidelines:

          During examinations, the student must be careful to do nothing that can be construed as cheating.  The student shall follow carefully all directions given by the instructor with regard to taking tests and completing assignments.

          The instructor’s request to keep test questions private shall be honored by the student.

          If the student is aware of practices by the instructor which are conducive to cheating, or of acts of cheating by students, he/she may convey this information either to any member of the student-faculty review committee (see section “V. Procedures”) or directly to the instructor.

          Learning the proper methods of documentation and scholarship is also the student’s responsibility. Such knowledge will help avoid committing plagiarism unwittingly.

           

          V. Procedures

          As evidence of the seriousness with which the College regards these matters, a student-faculty review committee, the Committee on Academic Discipline, has been established to assist in dealing with violators. The Committee on Academic Discipline exists also to protect the student’s right to a fair and impartial hearing. To ensure its effectiveness, the faculty should view it as the primary channel through which such problems can be resolved. The faculty member who believes a problem of cheating or plagiarism exists should first confront the student or students involved and attempt to resolve the matter. A report of the facts of the case and any decision which was made should be sent by the professor to the Dean or the committee. During this initial encounter the faculty member should inform the student of his/her right to appeal an unfavorable decision to the committee. This committee is comprised of three students, selected by a nominating committee of the Student Council; three faculty members, representing the three divisions of the College, elected by the faculty; and the Dean of the College, ex officio. The committee shall select its own chair. The committee can be convened by notifying either the Dean or the chair that there is a case.

          Written statements shall be made by both parties and made available to both parties and the committee prior to any oral testimony. Any refutations may be made in writing or orally at the hearing. Evidence not submitted in the original written statements will not normally be accepted at the oral hearing.

          All evidence in writing before the committee in a case shall be available to the principals.  The committee shall hear such cases as come before it and allow the student to speak on his or her own behalf and to present evidence and witnesses. Further, the burden of proof rests with the person making the charge.

          The committee is given the responsibility of recommending the penalties for the violator, and such penalties shall be commensurate with both the nature and the seriousness of the case in question. Typically, for the first offense of cheating or plagiarism, failure in the course will be recommended; of course, the instructor retains his/her right to assign the grade. Any subsequent offense may result in a recommendation to the Dean to suspend or dismiss the individual from the College. All final actions taken by the Dean that result from committee recommendations shall be entered in the student’s record.

          The committee may adopt additional principles or procedures as seem appropriate. Such changes, however, should be presented to the faculty for approval.

          Any student who believes the processing or final disposition of a charge of academic dishonesty was unfair may initiate a grievance under the Academic Grievance Procedure as outlined in the General Information section of this catalog.

          CHAPTER 3

          Nuts and Bolts

           

          Professional Development Course Observations

          Each new instructor will be observed twice in their first year of teaching, once in the fall semester by the Director of Composition and again in the spring semester by an Assistant Director of Composition. The observer will work with the instructor to schedule an appropriate time to conduct the observation. The instructor should send the observer an email containing the lesson plans for the class being observed prior to the observation. Once the observation has occurred, the observer and instructor will meet for a follow-up discussion. The observer will write a letter that will be placed in the instructors’ file following the guidelines at http://louisville.edu/english/composition/observation-template.html .

          Instructors will also be observed in their second year of teaching and in their fourth year of teaching by an assigned faculty member. More information about this process can be found at http://louisville.edu/english/composition/professional-development-observations.html .

          Accessing Rosters and Filing Grades 

          Instructions for accessing your class roster and filing your grades can be found at http://louisville.edu/registrar/grades.html

          Please see Appendices B and C for a step by step copy of these instructions.

          Book Orders

          Please place your order (or indicate that you will not be ordering a book) here http://louisville.edu/contractadmin/bookstore/follett-discover-course-material-adoptions.  If you have a problem with the online ordering process, you can send your book order by email to or contact the bookstore staff by phone at 852-8307.

          Schedules

          During the fall and spring semester you will receive a copy of the “scheduling preference sheets.” On this form, you will rank your preferences for composition courses and class-times. Your completed form is used to match you to the subsequent semester’s courses, according to your preferences.

          As indicated on the preference sheet:

          Please know that we solicit this information in a good faith effort to provide schedules that do the greatest good for the greatest number of people. Please also remember that the Composition Program schedule has to accommodate almost 70 people. We cannot guarantee the courses and the times/days you request, but we will do our best.

          The scheduling of classes works by the following process, Tenure-line faculty are given first preference for which Composition sections that wish to teach and these are scheduled by the English Department. Once tenure-line faculty have been scheduled the Assistant Directors of Composition draft the first version for the schedule.

          Preference sheets are arranged in the following order:

          1. Full-time lecturers
          2. Ph.D students
          3. M.A. students
          4. PTLs in Ph.D. Candidacy
          5. PTLs on L11 contracts (in order of consecutive years teaching in the UofL program)
          6. PTLS (in order of consecutive years teaching in the UofL program)

          If you have any problems with your schedule, please contact the Director of Composition (853.6896)

          Office Space

          Composition instructors are assigned carrel space in the two adjoining rooms that make up LL04 located in the basement of the Humanities Building. There are several computers available in each room as well as printers. Please note that printer use is limited to single copies of documents—for class sets, please use the copy machine in 318F. See he following section on Photocopying and Printing.

          Although you may be sharing a carrel due to limited space, you will most often do so with an instructor who teaches on days or times alternative to yours. Thus, many instructors will hold student conferences at their carrel. Alternately, there are two small conference rooms available within LL04 for your use.

          The desk spaces in Humanities LL04 have a limited number of lockable filing drawers. Keys can be signed out from the Program Administrative Specialist. Keys are assigned on a first-come basis and must be returned at the end of each semester.  

          If you have questions about your carrel space, please ask the Administrative Specialist (852.6896).

          Photocopying (HM 318F) & Printing

          The Composition Program Staff and Instructors have access to a copy machine in HM 318F.  Please ask the Administrative Specialist for assistance until you have familiarized yourself with the machine. If this machine is not in working order, instructors may use the machine in HM 315.

          Photocopying Policy

          Each instructor is allotted 500 copies per section per semester for every composition course you are assigned (this includes syllabi and class handouts). You must keep your own records in order to not exceed your quota. You must log in with your user UofL ID # to copy, and your number of pages is automatically recorded. An English department staff member will check the copying log monthly. Once you reach your allocation, your user ID will be deactivated, and you will not be able to make copies for the remainder of the semester. Note to GTAs: Photocopying services provided by the department are expected to be used for your teaching needs only – not coursework or other personal use. Copies for departmental duties, which include printing related to administrative, editorial, or research assistant positions should be made using the account number pertinent to each job.  

          In accordance with copyright law, the following rules of thumb apply when using the copy machine to duplicate:

          1. Class-sets of material that are instructor produced may be copied; for example, syllabi and assignment explanations.
          2. A copy of a journal article or book chapter (Note: no more than 1/3 of a book may be legally copied) which you plan to scan and make available to your students on BlackBoard.

          Printing Policy

          All composition instructors (GTAs, PTLs, and term faculty) are allotted 75 pages of printing per semester using the printer in the basement lab or offices. You must keep your own records in order to not exceed your quota. You must log in with your user ID to print, and your number of pages is automatically recorded. An English department staff member will check the printing log monthly. Once you reach your allocation, your user ID will be deactivated, and you will not be able to print for the remainder of the semester. Note to GTAs: Printing services provided by the department are expected to be used for your teaching needs only – not coursework or other personal use. Copies for departmental duties, which include printing related to administrative, editorial, or research assistant positions should be made using the account number pertinent to each job.

          Digital Writing Instruction (DW)

          The English Department maintains three computerized classrooms: Bingham HM 015, HM 104, and the MAC lab, HM 204.  Instructors are encouraged to teach courses in the lab — no prior experience with technology is required. Please indicate your technology preferences on your scheduling sheet and we will do our best to accommodate as many requests as possible.

           CHAPTER 4

          Teacher Resources: How can I be a more effective teacher?

          The E-Files

          The E-Files is a teaching resource for instructors in the English Department at the University of Louisville. This site allows you to search for policy statements, syllabi, assignments and student papers for any English class taught through U of L, to join in online discussions about teaching, and to find links to other relevant information. To add a document to E-File, send it as an attachment to adcquery@louisville.edu

          Access E-Files at this address: http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/

           

          Composition Office and ADC Files

          The main Composition Office is located in Bingham Humanities 315C. The Program Administrative Specialist  can assist you in finding answers to many of the questions/needs you will have over the course of a semester.

          Pedagogy Workshops

          Several times each semester, the Assistant Directors of Composition conduct teaching support workshops. All instructors in the program are encouraged (but not required) to attend and share their classroom strategies and stories—and maybe pick up a few tips from their colleagues.

          Bonnie Endowment Library

          Thanks to a generous endowment, the program acquires current books on composition theory and practice. This library is located in #333. Books may be signed out for a 30-day period (some books have a 7-day or overnight period) by checking with the Composition Program Administrative Specialist.

          There is a limit of five (5) books at one given time and a 15-day grace period for overdue books. Infraction of the policy may result in revoking your privilege to check out books.

          A searchable catalogue of The Bonnie Collection can be accessed online at http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/     

          Information Technology (IT) Resources

          Instructors not already using the Computer-Assisted Instruction rooms (see Digital Writing Instruction in Chapter 3: Nuts and Bolts of this handbook) may schedule audio-visual equipment for a class by going to http://louisville.edu/it/and clicking Online Forms, then select Access Classroom Services Forms. Complete the on-line form and submit it 48 hours before the date equipment will be used.

          If equipment is not ordered 48 hours before the desired time, the instructor will have to pick up and return the equipment.

          Bingham Humanities has several other classrooms equipped with audio-visual equipment cabinets that stay in the classroom. Class assignments to these classrooms should be requested well in advance of the semester start. Please check with Linda Baldwin.

          Instructors teaching in the Education Building should call the Education Resource and Technology Center at 852.6437 for audio-visual equipment requests.

          If you request technology and end up moving or canceling your class for any reason, please let IT know so that the equipment is not left unattended. You can easily do this by responding to the confirmation email that is sent to you when you make your request. 

          Ekstrom Library

          The Library Reserves Center allows instructors to place books or individual articles on reserve for their classes. Here are the Reserves Policies:

          1. Only items which are required course reading should be placed on reserve.
          2. Reserve requests must be typewritten and submitted on the forms provided by the Reserve Room.
          3. Photocopies supplied by faculty or copies from periodicals in the stacks for reserve will be placed in the photocopy files behind the Reserve Desk (arranged by author).
          4. Personal copies of books supplied by faculty for reserve will be placed in the "Personal Copy" section behind the Reserve Desk (arranged by author).
          5. All items placed on reserve will automatically be removed following the exam period at the end of each semester.
          6. If a faculty member wants items to continue to be held on reserve for the following semester, a written request should be sent to the Reserve Room supervisor prior to the end of the exam period.
          If you have questions about the Reserves policies, please refer to the following web address,

          http://minerva.louisville.edu/vwebv/enterCourseReserve.do or call 852.6757.

          Student Counseling Center

          This center provides group counseling, individual counseling, academic skills workshops such as time management, test anxiety management, and personal development workshops. For further information, see page 20 of the Student Handbook or contact Kathy Pendleton, Director, Counseling Services, Student Health/Counseling Building, 852.6585.

          REACH (Resources for Academic Achievement)

          REACH is a program to provide “academic support services and retention programs that encourage students to be independent and successful learners. These academic support services and retention programs offer participating students the opportunity to better prepare and adapt to college life and to improve their academic skills and performance in college courses” (qtd. from the REACH website). For more information on how REACH can benefit your students, please contact REACH offices located in the Belknap Academic Building, Suite 202, at 852-6706.

          The Writing Center

          The UofL Writing Center, located on the first floor of Ekstrom Library (Ekstrom 132), provides writing assistance to all students and faculty. The Writing Center has trained writing consultants on staff who can meet with your students to discuss their writings at any stage in the process, and students and faculty may visit the Writing Center or its website to find handouts on a large number of writing topics. The Composition Program works closely with the Writing Center and encourages you to make your students aware of its services.

          A representative from the University Writing Center visits each section of 101, 102, and 105 during the first three weeks of the semester for a 10 minute presentation about their services.  The University Writing Center schedules these class visits and will email instructors their scheduled date and time (either the beginning or end of class).  Instructors may opt out or request to reschedule their presentations.

          The Writing Center also supports instructors. For information on upcoming faculty workshops, see:http://louisville.edu/writingcenter/resources-for-faculty

          Digital Writing (DW) Resources

          The English Department maintains three computerized classrooms: Bingham HM 015, HM 104, and  and the MAC lab (HM 204).

          Instructors are encouraged to teach courses in the lab — no prior experience with technology is required. To request a computer classroom, indicate it on your scheduling preference sheet.

          The Assistant Directors of Composition offer in-person and in-class pedagogical mentoring and support for all teachers in the department. Please contact one of the ADCs to find out more, and please give the ADCs one week advanced notice for in-class support sessions.

          The Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

          The University of Louisville’s Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning offers technical and pedagogical support services for all instructors and students. According to its website, the Delphi Center offers the following services:

          • Workshops, conferences and materials to help faculty improve teaching
          • Development or promotion of methods to measure effective teaching and learning
          • Support for both face-to-face and technology-based instruction
          • Research in teaching and learning methodologies
          • Facilitation of campus-wide conversations and activities about the university’s central mission of teaching and learning
          To learn more, visit the Delphi Center’s website at this address: http://delphi.louisville.edu/

           

          Blackboard

          Blackboard is the university-wide online resource center that offers many ways for you and your students to communicate and complete assignments. Blackboard enables you to complete such tasks as sending email to your entire class, posting readings, holding online discussions through discussion boards or chat, and calculating weighted grades.

          The Assistant Directors of Composition offer Blackboard mentoring services to all instructors in the program. ADCs can come to your class for pedagogical support or meet with you outside of class to help you work through some of Blackboard’s quirks. (Please notify the ADCs at least a week prior to classroom visits.)

          Other Technology

          Many instructors are choosing to use other types of technology such as Twitter, WordPress Blogs, etc. in their courses. While these technologies can enhance the learning environment, they operate outside of the secure course management system provided by the university. If you choose to use online technology, outside of the university Blackboard system, you must inform your students that these alternatives are not supported by the university and are not secure as manner that the Blackboard course management system.

          CHAPTER 5

          Frequently Asked Questions

          What are the duties of the Composition Program Administrative Specialist?

          The Composition Program Administrative Specialist is your resource for issues pertaining to your teaching of composition classes (English 101, 102, 105, 303, 306, 309). You may contact the administrative specialist when you need information about carrel or classroom assignments; administrative paperwork such as grade change forms, petitions, etc.; and student or faculty evaluations of your teaching.

          For information about assistantships or fellowships, enrolling in courses, or health insurance, you should see the Assistant to the Director of Graduate Studies, who is your resource for issues pertaining to you as a student. Additionally, you should see the Unit Business Manager for information about paychecks and travel reimbursement.

          Where do I get office supplies?

          Limited office supplies such as chalk, dry erase markers, and pens are available in the blue metal cabinet in the main English office, Humanities 315. Check there, and if you don’t find what you’re looking for, see the Office Manager, who may be able to fulfill your specific request.

          What should I know about UofL students?

          See https://louisville.edu/about/profile for up-to-date information about student enrollments, demographics, and average ACT score. 

          Additionally, a number of UofL students participate in a program called Metropolitan College, in which they earn partial tuition by working for the UPS Next Day Air operation. Most of these students take classes between 5 p.m. and 10 p.m., and work 15-20 hours per week at UPS between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m.

          What do I need to know about using portfolios in my class?

          Instructors using portfolios in their classes are encouraged to plan the semester so that portfolios will be ready to return to students during final exam week, possibly during the officially scheduled final exam time for the course. In addition, for ease of storage instructors are encouraged to require students to use paper folders rather than ring binders or to have their portfolios bound at one of the Copy IT Centers on campus. The Composition Program is obligated to store uncollected portfolios for one year.

          Where should I store portfolios that my students don’t collect, and how can I access them when students do return for them?

          Portfolios to be stored should be identified with the student’s name, course and section number, year and term, with teacher’s name written clearly across the top of the front cover. They are to be placed in the Portfolio Storage Room (located at the far end of 4F). A key to this room is located on the back of the 4H mailboxes, and you may use this to let yourself in either to leave portfolios or to return one to a student.

          The composition program personnel will attempt to have a supply of empty boxes on the shelves for your use, but we ask that you find your own box if there are none available; please label the outside of your box with your name, section number, semester and year.

          What is the overenrollment policy?

          Individual instructors are not able to over enroll students in their course.

          Students may only apply to over enroll in Composition Program courses if they are graduating seniors and need the course to graduate the semester they wish to over enroll. Graduating seniors who wish to enroll in a course that is full should first attempt to place their names on the electronic waiting list for the course. Once the waiting list has expired, if the graduating senior has not been able to enroll in the course, the student should obtain documentation of this status from the student's academic advisor and bring it to the Composition Program Office in Humanities 321.

          What do I tell students who ask about adding or dropping a class after the deadline?

          Students who miss the deadline to add or drop an A&S course must submit a petition to the A&S Admissions and Appeals Committee. Provide them with the following link: http://louisville.edu/a-s/students/aac/adddrop.html

          What should I tell students who inquire about transfer credit?

          You should instruct students to obtain a copy of a transcript (it may be unofficial) indicating that the student passed the course in question and a copy of the syllabus showing specifically how much and what types of papers the student was required to write and if the writing went through the appropriate process (i.e. drafting, revision, etc.). The student should then take these documents to an Assistant Director of Composition, who will determine whether the course in question is equivalent to UofL composition courses.

          What do I tell students who inquire about the portfolio placement program or Advanced Placement (AP) scores?

          Students may submit their portfolios through the Portfolio Placement Project during the summer prior to their first year at the University of Louisville. Portfolios are scored by UofL Composition instructors, and students are placed into first-year writing classes based on these scores. Contact an Assistant Director of Composition for details, or see the Composition Program website for more information.

          Students who have advanced placement scores should consult the A&S Advising Office in Gardiner Hall, 852.6487.

          Who should I contact if I think a student in my class should enroll in an English as a Second Language (ESL) section?

          The University of Louisville offers sections of first year writing classes designed specifically to the needs of ESL students. An instructor may discover from an initial writing sample that perhaps a student should take advantage of an ESL section. In this case the student may want to request a change to the ESL section. These students should be directed to see the Composition Program Administrative Assistant in Room 321, Bingham Humanities, or to consult with the Director of Composition.

          What happens when a student expresses a complaint about my class?

          If a student approaches an Assistant Director of Composition (ADC) to express a complaint about your class, the ADC will first ask if the student has expressed this concern to the instructor. The student will be encouraged to do so, and the ADC will make the instructor aware of the situation. If the meeting between instructor and student does not reach a favorable conclusion, the student should again meet with the ADC. The student will be asked to put the complaint in writing, and the ADC will then contact the instructor to discuss the situation and to ask the instructor to provide a written account of his or her own recollection of the events. The ADC will then attempt to mediate a solution. If the student and/or instructor disagree with the solution, the case will then be referred to the Director of Composition.

          What do I do if I have a disruptive student in my class?

          It is not acceptable for one student to disrupt others’ learning. You should inform the student that the exhibited behavior is disruptive, and then if the situation doesn’t improve, see an Assistant Director of Composition or the Director of Composition. For more information on dealing with disruptive students, see the Classroom Disruption Policy in the Appendix.

          What is the process for addressing plagiarism?

          You should discuss plagiarism with your students, particularly as it relates to collaborative learning and writing and the principles of documentation. The Composition Program does not use plagiarism detection software and instead prefers to deal with the issue through effective writing process pedagogy, including good assignment design and individual responses to student writing.

          If you suspect a case of plagiarism, you should notify an ADC and schedule a meeting with the student outside of class. You may request that an ADC be present at this meeting. You should decide how you plan to handle the case before meeting with the student. You should make copies of the plagiarized assignment so that you have a copy for your records. It is helpful to clearly have the source of the material to show to the student. You may also want to print or save the plagiarized source for your records.

          Based on the type of plagiarism, you may select to do one of the following:

          1. Provide the student with the opportunity and specific guidelines to redo the assignment for a reduced grade. If you choose this option, the guidelines should be written out and a copy given to the student and an ADC. This may take the form of an email.
          2. Fail the student for the assignment. If you choose this option, make copies of the assignment and the plagiarized source for your records.
          3. Fail the student for the course and notify the College A & S of the plagiarism. If you choose this option, make copies of the assignment and the plagiarized source for your records.

          An ADC can help you to plan the course of action based on the details of the circumstance.

          The following resources are available for further guidance on discussing plagiarism:

          University Writing Center http://breeze.louisville.edu/plagiarism09

          Information Literacy http://library.louisville.edu/infoliteracy/

          Statement of Academic Discipline from the College of Arts & Sciences:

          In accordance with The Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities academic dishonesty is prohibited at the University of Louisville. Although cheating and plagiarism have never constituted a major problem, both faculty and students thought it important to express clearly, in advance, the standards to which the College adheres. The Statement of Academic Discipline printed below is the result of their effort and serves as the official statement for the College.

          Questions which do arise are reviewed by a joint student-faculty committee, which advises the student and faculty concerned. Rights of the student to review and appeal are scrupulously observed, and minutes of all meetings are confidential.

          I. Introduction

          As members of the academic community, both students and faculty are expected to recognize and to uphold standards of intellectual integrity. The College assumes as a minimum standard of conduct in academic matters that the student is honest; credit for courses is given and received on the assumption and condition that all work submitted represents the student’s own efforts.

          Unfortunately, cheating and plagiarism do occur. The pressure for grades is often great, and opportunities for dishonesty exist. Nevertheless, both the ideals of scholarship and the need for practices which are fair to all students demand that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit. The definitions and guidelines given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic work is to be measured.

          II. Definitions

          Cheating on examinations consists of any of the following: 1) borrowing someone’s answers; 2) providing answers to someone; 3) using unauthorized materials during the examinations.

          Except when otherwise explicitly stated by the instructor, examination questions shall become public property after they have been given.

          Plagiarism, in submitting individual work for academic evaluation, means simply to borrow someone’s ideas without citing the source, and to use them as one’s own. It is a particular type of cheating. Plagiarism in this sense is not limited to the use of direct quotations without citation; a paraphrase is indebted to the author’s ideas just as a direct quotation is. Nor is plagiarism limited to the use of published materials; borrowing from the written or oral work of others without citation is equally dishonest. On the other hand, in every area of learning there is a body of knowledge which belongs to the public domain. Guidance and experience may be necessary in order to distinguish where the requirement to cite a source no longer applies. The instructor or perhaps a style manual may be helpful in resolving questions about what should be cited.

          III. Guidelines for Instructors

          Instructors have at least two roles to play in maintaining proper standards of academic conduct:

          • to assist their students in recognizing the way in which general standards apply in the context of a particular course or discipline;
          • to take practical steps to prevent cheating and detect it when it occurs. Specific guidelines, several of them obvious, should be followed:
          • That instructors take the time to inform students of the standards of conduct expected of them with regard to assignments and examinations.
          • That practical measures be taken to minimize opportunities for dishonesty; e.g., adequate proctoring, the use of alternate forms of an examination if seating is crowded.
          • The practice of giving identical examinations to different classes, whether separated in time by ten minutes or by a semester, invites cheating. When there are good reasons for such repetition, appropriate security precautions should be taken.
          • The repeated assignment of the same material for papers or homework invites plagiarism. When assignments are repeated, students should be informed that the unauthorized reliance on earlier papers is forbidden and that the instructor has effective means of detecting same.
          • That the instructor specify with regard to assignments the degree to which students may confer and cooperate in achieving answers.
          • The College does not operate on an honor system. If within a particular class an instructor wishes to institute such a system, the students should be clearly informed of their responsibilities.

          IV. Guidelines for Students

          Recognizing his/her responsibility as a member of the academic community, the student should strive to maintain intrinsically honest academic conduct. The student must seek to avoid any action which would compromise academic integrity. To ensure both the fact and the appearance of proper conduct, the student should follow these basic guidelines:

          During examinations, the student must be careful to do nothing that can be construed as cheating.  The student shall follow carefully all directions given by the instructor with regard to taking tests and completing assignments.

          The instructor’s request to keep test questions private shall be honored by the student.

          If the student is aware of practices by the instructor which are conducive to cheating, or of acts of cheating by students, he/she may convey this information either to any member of the student-faculty review committee (see section “V. Procedures”) or directly to the instructor.

          Learning the proper methods of documentation and scholarship is also the student’s responsibility. Such knowledge will help avoid committing plagiarism unwittingly.

          V. Procedures

          As evidence of the seriousness with which the College regards these matters, a student-faculty review committee, the Committee on Academic Discipline, has been established to assist in dealing with violators. The Committee on Academic Discipline exists also to protect the student’s right to a fair and impartial hearing. To ensure its effectiveness, the faculty should view it as the primary channel through which such problems can be resolved. The faculty member who believes a problem of cheating or plagiarism exists should first confront the student or students involved and attempt to resolve the matter. A report of the facts of the case and any decision which was made should be sent by the professor to the Dean or the committee. During this initial encounter the faculty member should inform the student of his/her right to appeal an unfavorable decision to the committee. This committee is comprised of three students, selected by a nominating committee of the Student Council; three faculty members, representing the three divisions of the College, elected by the faculty; and the Dean of the College, ex officio. The committee shall select its own chair. The committee can be convened by notifying either the Dean or the chair that there is a case.

          Written statements shall be made by both parties and made available to both parties and the committee prior to any oral testimony. Any refutations may be made in writing or orally at the hearing. Evidence not submitted in the original written statements will not normally be accepted at the oral hearing.

          All evidence in writing before the committee in a case shall be available to the principals.  The committee shall hear such cases as come before it and allow the student to speak on his or her own behalf and to present evidence and witnesses. Further, the burden of proof rests with the person making the charge.

          The committee is given the responsibility of recommending the penalties for the violator, and such penalties shall be commensurate with both the nature and the seriousness of the case in question. Typically, for the first offense of cheating or plagiarism, failure in the course will be recommended; of course, the instructor retains his/her right to assign the grade. Any subsequent offense may result in a recommendation to the Dean to suspend or dismiss the individual from the College. All final actions taken by the Dean that result from committee recommendations shall be entered in the student’s record.

          The committee may adopt additional principles or procedures as seem appropriate. Such changes, however, should be presented to the faculty for approval.

          Any student who believes the processing or final disposition of a charge of academic dishonesty was unfair may initiate a grievance under the Academic Grievance Procedure as outlined in the General Information section of this catalog.

          You can also find additional information on how the university defines plagiarism in the Appendix.

          What kinds of records should I keep?

          You want to keep your gradebook and final grade sheet, should you need to show documentation of a student’s performance in your class. Additionally, you should also keep attendance records. You are further encouraged to keep a record of email correspondence with students.

          What is my responsibility regarding sexual harassment?

          According to UofL Human Resources, “it is the responsibility of each member of the University community to know the University's Policy on Sexual Harassment as well as the Complaint Resolution Procedures and to become familiar with their provisions. Failure to follow or utilize the procedures set forth in this policy may inhibit or prevent the University from taking appropriate remedial action, or properly investigating an incident of alleged sexual harassment.” See the Appendix for more information about sexual harassment.

          APPENDIX A

          University Contacts

          For more information about most of the organizations listed below, consult the Student Affairs Website:

          http://louisville.edu/student/

          ACADEMIC SERVICES FOR ATHLETES, SAC E202

          Marvin Mitchell, Assoc. Athletic Director for Academic Services, 852.7490 or 852.6006. Provides academic support for U of L athletes.

          COUNSELING CENTER, 2207 S. Brook St., Louisville, KY 40292

          Kathy Pendleton, Director, Counseling Services, Student Health/Counseling Building, 852.6585. This center provides group counseling, individual counseling, academic skills workshops such as time management, test anxiety management, and personal development workshops

          DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER, 119 Stevenson Hall

          Cathy Patus, Director, 852.6938. Provides and coordinates support services for students with disabilities. If you have a seeing or hearing-impaired student or a student with a learning disability, work through the Composition Administrative Assistant.

          GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL

          GSC President, 852.1571, gspres@louisville.edu GSC Office: Houchens Bldg. 105N, 852.2364.

          GSC Travel Fund Administrator, gsctravl@louisville.edu

           

          HEALTH SERVICES, Cardinal Station, 215 Central Ave., Suite 110

          Dr. Phillip Bressoud, Director, Student Health, 852.6479. Offers outpatient clinical care to students and their spouses and children either on a fee basis or through the Health Service Plan. Faculty members and part-time teaching staff may also be eligible to subscribe to a Health Service Plan; call 852-6479 for details.

          INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT/MEDIA DISTRIBUTION - CLASSROOM SUPPORT

          E-mail ITMEDIA or search the UofL web page for miniform. Strickler Hall- 852-6465 (Mike Murphy, Henry Smith, Anthony Hundley, [Mary Donnelley- evenings and weekends]). Shelby Provices audiovisual equipment for classrooms.

          LIBRARY—EKSTROM

          Reference Desk, 852.6747. Rob Detmering  (852-8738) is the liaison for library orientation and research projects for English 101, 102, and 105 classes. To reserve lab space or to request a librarian to teach your class  send a miniform from the UofL Libraries web page http://louisville.edu/library/forms/classes l

          PAYROLL

          Contact the Unit Business Manager in Humanities Bldg., Room 315, Department of English, 852.0504, for questions involving payroll and/or FICA forms.

          PUBLIC SAFETY

          S. Floyd Street (parking garage complex), 852.6111. The Public Safety Department provides security to all campus buildings, assistance if you have car problems (i.e., dead battery, flat tire, key locked in car), and an escort service for those who are traveling to and from their cars after dark.

          U of L students ride free with U of L ID.

          REACH (RESOURCES FOR ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT)

          REACH.LOUISVILLE.EDU or 852.6706. Located in the Belknap Academic Building Suite 202, REACH is the centralized academic support unit with free tutoring services and retention programs for undergraduate students at UofL. 

          REACH works with over 4,000 students a year from honors to "high risk" offering scheduled tutoring for 100, 200 and some 300 level courses, supplemental instruction for 25+ courses each semester, math support up to Calculus II, and student success seminars.

          SPECIAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS

          Adult Commuter Center and Evening Student Services (ACCESS). 105 Davidson Hall, 852.7070.

          STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA)

          SGA President, W310S SAC, 852.6695, e-mail: general@uoflsga.orgThis is a university-wide graduate student organization;

          English students should work through the English Graduate Organization (EGO). http://egoatuofl.wordpress.com./

          STUDENT GRIEVANCE OFFICE

          Professor Brenda Hart is the Student Grievance Officer. Please call the Student Life office at 852.6102 if there is a problem, grievance, or complaint. Composition instructors should use the program’s grievance procedures (see one of the assistant director’s of composition for information or the administrative assistant before referring a student to the Student Life office). E-mail: brenda@louisville.edu.

          TESTING CENTER

          Tammy Duddy, 310 Davidson Hall, 852.6606. This testing center serves as a national, regional, state and University testing agency.

           

          UNIVERSITY VETERANS' BENEFITS

          Joe Dablow, Associate Director, 852.4969

          UNIVERSITY VETERANS' SERVICES

          Houchens Building, Lower Level 008, 852.6442 or 852.8353. (Ann Kirwan, VA Rep. 852.0998). Veterans must consult this office each time they register, drop/add a class, change an address, or change a program of study.

          APPENDIX B

          Accessing Class Rosters

           

          Instructions for accessing your class roster and filing your grades can be found at http://louisville.edu/student/services/registrar/roster.htmwhich offers the following information:

           

          1. LOGIN ID and PASSWORD: You may access your class rosters from PeopleSoft by logging in at: http://ulink.louisville.edu. Your account and password are the same as what you use to access your pay stub. If you are unsure about your PeopleSoft account or password, please read the information provided under the "For first-time users" link on the ULink log on page.
          2. ONCE YOU LOG ON: Click on Faculty/Staff Services tab (across the top), go to the menu item, "Academics", then click on "Class Rosters". Select the term by clicking the appropriate choice. You will then see a list of your class(es) for that term. Click on the roster you wish to view. You may also print the roster using your browser print icon.

          APPENDIX C

          How to Post Final Grades

          1. LOGIN ID and PASSWORD: You may access your class rosters from PeopleSoft by logging in at: http://ulink.louisville.edu. Your account and password are the same as what you use to access your pay stub. If you are unsure about your PeopleSoft account or password, please read the information provided under the "For first-time users" link on the ULink log on page.
          2. ONCE YOU LOG ON: For grades: Click on Faculty/Staff Services tab (across the top), go to the menu item, "Academics," then click on "Record Grades."


          Select the term by clicking on the appropriate choice. You will then see a list of your classes for that term. Click on the roster you wish to grade or the class list you wish to view.

          Entering Grades:

            1. Enter grades by directly typing them in the Grade Input Box, or by using the lookup button next to the box to choose from a list of valid grades.
            2. If you want to enter a partial list of grades, click on the save button at the end of the page. You may then return to the roster later to complete grade entry.
            3. When you complete grading, click on the save button.
            4. At this time you should make a final review of the grades. Enter your changes and click on the save button.
            5. When you are satisfied that all grades are appropriately entered and Saved, change the approval status to Approved and click on the save button again at the bottom of the page.
            6. To change a grade on an approved roster, move the status marker back to Not Reviewed, enter your changes, and click on the Saved button. Then change the roster status marker back to Approved and click on the Save button again.
            7. Approved rosters are posted several times a day, after which the roster no longer shows an Approval Status box or grade input column. Any changes to grades after this point must go through your school's normal channels for grade changes. Students can access posted grades by web or phone.

          APPENDIX D

          Classroom Disruption Policy

          An Advisory from the Office of Campus Life

          During recent years, we have seen an increase in the number and severity of incidents of classroom disruption. The Office of Campus Life offers the following advisory to assist faculty members who may encounter a disruptive student.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->1. <!--[endif]-->Classroom disruption is seen as a disciplinary offense, as defined by the University’s Code of Student Conduct. The term “classroom disruption” means behavior a reasonable person would view as substantially or repeatedly interfering with the conduct of a class. Examples include repeatedly leaving and entering the classroom without authorization, making loud or distracting noises, persisting in speaking without being recognized, or resorting to physical threats or personal insults.

          Such conduct may also reflect upon a person’s fitness to continue in an academic program (See Redbook 6.6.3). Faculty should keep their department chair informed of any situation involving student behavior so that the appropriate assessments may be made regarding the student’s academic status.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->2. <!--[endif]-->A faculty member is responsible for management of the classroom environment. Teachers can be compared to judges; both focus on relevant issues, set reasonable time limits, assets the quality of ideas and expression, and make sure participants are heard in an orderly manner. While their ultimate goals may be different, both judges and teachers need to exercise authority with a sense of fairness, and with appreciation for the reality of human fallibility.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->3. <!--[endif]-->A student has freedom of inquiry, of legitimate class room discussion, and of free expression of his or her opinion, subject to the teacher’s responsibilities to maintain order and to complete the course requirements (See Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities, Section 4).

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->4. <!--[endif]-->Rudeness, incivility, and disruption are often indistinguishable, though they may intersect. Most often, it’s better to respond to rudeness by example and situation (e.g., advising a student in private that he or she appears to have a habit of interrupting others). Rudeness can become disruption when it is repetitive, especially after a warning has been given.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->5. <!--[endif]-->Strategies to prevent and respond to disruptive behavior include the following:

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->a. <!--[endif]-->Clarify standards for the conduct of your class. For example, if you want students to raise their hands for permission to speak, say so, using reminders, as needed.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->b. <!--[endif]-->Serve as a role model for the conduct you expect from your students.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->c. <!--[endif]-->If you believe inappropriate behavior is occurring, consider a general word of caution, rather than warning a particular student (e.g., we have too many contemporaneous conversations at the moment; let’s all focus on the same topic).

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->d. <!--[endif]-->If the behavior is irritating, but not disruptive, speak with the student after class. Most students are unaware of distracting habits or mannerisms, and have not intent to be offensive or disruptive. Make students aware of what behavior is expected.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->e. <!--[endif]-->There may be rare circumstances when it is necessary to speak to a student during class about his or her behavior. Try to do so firmly, indicating that further discussion can occur after class. Public arguments and harsh language must be avoided.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->f. <!--[endif]-->A student who persists in disrupting a class may be directed to leave the classroom for the remainder of the class period. Whenever possible, prior consultation should be undertaken with the Department Chair and the Executive Director of Campus Life (852.5787) to review applicable University procedures.

          <!--[if !supportLists]-->g. <!--[endif]-->If disruption is serious, and other reasonable measures have failed, the class may be adjourned and the University Police summoned (852.6111). Faculty members must not use force or threats of force, except in immediate self-defense. Prepare a written account of the incident(s). Identify witnesses for the University Police, as needed.

           

          6. The Office of Campus Life can help by reviewing University disciplinary procedures with you, and meeting with accused students formally, or informally. It is better to document and report disruptive incidents to us promptly, even if they seem minor. One of our preferred strategies is to outline behavioral expectations with students, so they have clear guidelines about what is expected of them in the classroom setting. In the most serious cases, a student can be suspended immediately, pending disciplinary proceedings.

          APPENDIX E

          College Attendance Policy

           

          From the Undergraduate Catalog, 2006-2008
          College of Arts & Sciences

           

          The College assumes that all students will accept responsibility for attending all classes. Attendance is an obvious factor in knowing what material was covered and what assignments were made during the class period. It is the student’s responsibility to find out what work was missed. Absence from class in no way relieves the student of responsibility for any of the course work.

          Instructors are not required or expected to investigate prolonged absences. Students who stop attending class without officially dropping before the advertised deadline will remain on the class roster, and instructors will assign these students the grade “F.”

          Instructors who choose to do so may include attendance in determining a student’s grade. Instructors who use attendance as a factor must indicate on their syllabus what their policy is and how attendance will affect the student’s grade.

          APPENDIX F

          Excused Absences for University-Sanctioned Events


          On the recommendation of the Faculty Senate, Provost Willihnganz has approved the following guidelines for student absences excused by reason of participation in university-sanctioned events. These guidelines replace the Faculty Senate statement of July 8, 1998.


          Resolved by the Faculty Senate, September 6, 2006:

          Although each college, school, or academic unit of the University of Louisville creates its own regulations concerning class attendance, all units hold students responsible for materials covered, lectures given, papers due, exams scheduled, or other evaluative measures administered. The academy requires student participation in the learning process, measurement of student progress, and the fulfillment of basic course requirements.

          However, because the university recognizes that educational experiences extend beyond the classroom and campus, faculty are expected to be flexible with students who are acting as official representatives of the university, or participating in university-sanctioned events or activities that require absence from class. A university sanctioned event or activity shall be one in which a student represents the university to external constituencies in academic or extra-curricular activities. These include but are not limited to student government congresses, intercollegiate athletic and debate contests, music competitions, academic meetings, and conferences. The deans, the student government association, or faculty sponsors of recognized student organizations may petition the provost to designate other events or categories of events as university-sanctioned.

          When students’ participation in university-sanctioned events or activities requires them to be absent from a class (or classes) during which an examination or other measurement of academic progress is scheduled, faculty are expected to provide students with opportunities to be evaluated at other times or by comparable alternative evaluation methods within a reasonable period of time prior to or after the absence.

          Faculty members are expected to provide students in their classes with clear syllabi, including attendance requirements and dates for required measurements or field experiences. Attendance policies should allow excused absences for university-sanctioned events.

          Students who seek excused absences to attend university-sanctioned events are expected to follow the instructions below, and are expected to complete assignments on time, actively participate in other class sessions, and to make up work missed as agreed upon with the faculty member. Students are expected to attend regularly at other times.

          Official notice of a university-sanctioned event shall consist of an excused absence request letter from the sponsoring unit or program to the faculty whose class(es) will be missed, delivered by the student. The excused absence letter may request blanket approval for a series of events or approval of a single event. If the event or class of events has not already been designated as university-sanctioned, the letter must be signed by the provost or her/his designee1. The letter must be delivered to and received by the faculty member at the beginning of the semester for a series of events or a minimum of one week prior to the event or activity. The letter shall include the following data:

          1. Name, date(s), and location(s) of the event(s).
          2. Date of departure from campus and exact time when the student is expected to report for departure.
          3. Date of return to campus and exact day and time that the student will be expected to return to class.
          4. The faculty member will respond in writing. Approval indicates that the instructor will provide opportunities for students to be evaluated at other times or by comparable alternative evaluation methods, within a reasonable period of time prior to or after the absence, without academic penalty.

          If the letter requests blanket approval at the beginning of the term for a series of absences and the faculty member determines that the absences will seriously compromise the student’s performance in the course, the faculty member may deny the excused absence request within the first week of classes, thereby allowing the student to drop the course and add another. If the letter requests absence from an exam or other evaluative measure later in the term (but at least one week in advance) and the faculty member determines that the requested absence will compromise the student’s performance in the course, the faculty member may deny the excused absence.

          The student may appeal denial of an excused absence to the provost or the provost’s designee[1]. Students who believe themselves to be penalized by an instructor, either by a disproportionate task to make up missed work or a grade reduction, may also appeal. Reprisals for following the policy or for reporting a failure to follow the policy are prohibited.

          On occasion, students will not anticipate an absence for a university-sanctioned event until late in the term and will be unable to provide a week’s notice. Such events include but are not limited to post-season tournaments or participation in a regional or national competition. In such instances, the student will provide the faculty member with a letter from the sponsor of the event as soon as the event is scheduled, and the faculty member is asked to be as flexible as possible.

          1. The designee for these guidelines is Dr. Dale B. Billingsley, associate university provost for undergraduate affairs (852-520).

          APPENDIX G

          Statement of Academic Discipline

          Undergraduate Catalog

          In accordance with The Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities academic dishonesty is prohibited at the University of Louisville. Although cheating and plagiarism have never constituted a major problem, both faculty and students thought it important to express clearly, in advance, the standards to which the College adheres. The Statement of Academic Discipline printed below is the result of their effort and serves as the official statement for the College. Questions which do arise are reviewed by a joint student-faculty committee, which advises the student and faculty concerned. Rights of the student to review and appeal are scrupulously observed, and minutes of all meetings are confidential.

          Introduction

          Unfortunately, cheating and plagiarism do occur. The pressure for grades is often great, and opportunities for dishonesty exist. Nevertheless, both the ideals of scholarship and the need for practices which are fair to all students demand that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit. The definitions and guidelines given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic work is to be measured.

          As members of the academic community, both students and faculty are expected to recognize and to uphold standards of intellectual integrity. The College assumes as a minimum standard of conduct in academic matters that the student is honest; credit for courses is given and received on the assumption and condition that all work submitted represents the student’s own efforts.

          Definitions

          Cheating on examinations consists of any of the following: 1) borrowing someone’s answers; 2) providing answers to someone; 3) using unauthorized materials during the examinations. Except when otherwise explicitly stated by the instructor, examination questions shall become public property after

          Plagiarism, in submitting individual work for academic evaluation, means simply to borrow someone’s ideas without citing the source, and to use them as one’s own. It is a particular type of cheating. Plagiarism in this sense is not limited to the use of direct quotations without citation; a paraphrase is indebted to the author’s ideas just as a direct quotation is. Nor is plagiarism limited to the use of published materials; borrowing from the written or oral work of others without citation is equally dishonest. On the other hand, in every area of learning there is a body of knowledge which belongs to the public domain. Guidance and experience may be necessary in order to distinguish where the requirement to cite a source no longer applies. The instructor or perhaps a style manual may be helpful in resolving questions about what should be cited.

          Guidelines for Instructors

          Instructors have at least two roles to play in maintaining proper standards of academic conduct:

          1. to assist their students in recognizing the way in which general standards apply in the context of a particular course or discipline; 2) to take practical steps to prevent cheating and detect it when it occurs. Specific guidelines, several of them obvious, should be followed:

          1. That instructors take the time to inform students of the standards of conduct expected of them with regard to assignments and examinations.
          2. That practical measures be taken to minimize opportunities for dishonesty; e.g., adequate proctoring, the use of alternate forms of an examination if seating is crowded.
          3. The practice of giving identical examinations to different classes, whether separated in time by ten minutes or by a semester, invites cheating. When there are good reasons for such repetition, appropriate security precautions should be taken.
          4. The repeated assignment of the same material for papers or homework invites plagiarism. When assignments are repeated, students should be informed that the unauthorized reliance on earlier papers is forbidden and that the instructor has effective means of detecting same.
          5. That the instructor specify with regard to assignments the degree to which students may confer and cooperate in achieving answers.
          6. The College does not operate on an honor system. If within a particular class an instructor wishes to institute such a system, the students should be clearly informed of their responsibilities.

          Guidelines for Students

          Recognizing his/her responsibility as a member of the academic community, the student should strive to maintain intrinsically honest academic conduct. The student must seek to avoid any action which would compromise academic integrity. To ensure both the fact and the appearance of proper conduct, the student should follow these basic guidelines:

          1. During examinations, the student must be careful to do nothing that can be construed as cheating.
          2. The student shall follow carefully all dir ections given by the instructor with regard to taking tests and completing assignments.
          3. The instructor’s request to keep test questions private shall be honored by the student.
          4. If the student is aware of practices by the instructor which are conducive to cheating, or of acts of cheating by students, he/she may convey this information either to any member of the student-faculty review committee (see section “V. Procedures”) or directly to the instructor.
          5. Learning the proper methods of documentation and scholarship is also the student’s responsibility. Such knowledge will help avoid committing plagiarism unwittingly.

          Procedures

          As evidence of the seriousness with which the College regards these matters, a student-faculty review committee, the Committee on Academic Discipline has been established to assist in dealing with violators. The Committee on Academic Discipline exists also to protect the student’s right to a fair and impartial hearing. To ensure its effectiveness, the faculty should view it as the primary channel through which such problems can be resolved.

          The faculty member who believes a problem of cheating or plagiarism exists should first confront the student or students involved and attempt to resolve the matter. A report of the facts of the case and any decision which was made should be sent by the professor to the Dean or the committee. During this initial encounter the faculty member should inform the student of his/her right to appeal an unfavorable decision to the committee. This committee is comprised of three students, selected by a nominating committee of the Student Council; three faculty members, representing the three divisions of the College, elected by the faculty; and the Dean of the College, ex officio. The committee shall select its own chair. The committee can be convened by notifying either the Dean or the chair that there is a case. Written statements shall be made by both parties and made available to both parties and the committee prior to any oral testimony. Any refutations may be made in writing or orally at the hearing. Evidence not submitted in the original written statements will not normally be accepted at the oral hearing. All evidence in writing before the committee in a case shall be available to the principals. The committee shall hear such cases as come before it and allow the student to speak on his or her own behalf and to present evidence and witnesses. Further, the burden of proof rests with the person making the charge.

          The committee is given the responsibility of recommending the penalties for the violator, and such penalties shall be commensurate with both the nature and the seriousness of the case in question. Typically, for the first offense of cheating or plagiarism, failure in the course will be recommended; of course, the instructor retains his/her right to assign the grade.

          Any subsequent offense may result in a recommendation to the Dean to suspend or dismiss the individual from the College. All final actions taken by the Dean that result from committee recommendations shall be entered in the student’s record. The committee may adopt additional principles or procedures as seem appropriate. Such changes, however, should be presented to the faculty for approval.

          Any student who believes the processing or final disposition of a charge of academic dishonesty was unfair may initiate a grievance under the Academic Grievance Procedure as outlined in the General Information section of this catalog.

          APPENDIX H

          Policy against the Use of Plagiarism Detection Software - coming soon

          APPENDIX I

          Sexual Harassment Definitions and Procedures

          What constitutes sexual harassment?

          Examples of conduct that may constitute or support a finding of sexual harassment in violation of the University's Policy on Sexual Harassment includes, but is not limited to, the following:

          Physical

          • Unnecessary and unwanted physical contact
          • Unwanted hugging or touching
          • Brushing up against a person's body, pressing or rubbing
          • Touching of one's own body in a sexually suggestive way
          • Blocking someone's path or impeding their movement
          • Stalking, physical assault, or coerced sexual activity
          Non-Verbal
          • Obscene or offensive gestures
          • Scoping, staring, leering, or looking at a person's body from head to toe (elevator eyes)
          • Altering a photograph or cartoon in such a way as to make the content look sexually suggestive
          • Graffiti with sexual content
          • Display of calendars or web sites with sexually suggestive material
          • Noises, such as animal sounds, lip-smacking, sucking, and wolf whistles
          Verbal
          • Sexual comments or innuendoes
          • Offensive or derogatory comments or jokes of a sexual or gender specific nature
          • Repeated requests for dates or sex
          • Spreading rumors of one's physical attributes or sexual activity
          • Comments of one's physical attributes
          • Rating a person from 1 to 10
          • Sexually explicit or sexually suggestive mail, e-mail and voice mail
          What do I do if I’m accused of sexual harassment?

          If you are a person accused of sexual harassment (Respondent) you should take the complaint seriously and, where applicable, stop any offending behavior immediately. You should document your version of the incident(s) and any conversation(s) you have regarding the alleged behavior you are being accused of. You should include the date(s) and name(s) of any person(s) who may have been involved. You should include the name(s) of anyone who may have witnessed the incident(s) or who may have overheard the incident(s). You should immediately notify your supervisor, Chair, Dean, Department Head or the Affirmative Action/Employee Relations Office.

          APPENDIX J

          FAQ About How the New Common Core Standards Impact UofL Writing Instructors[1]

          What are the Common Core Standards?

          The Common Core Standards (CCS) is a set of educational standards for English language arts and mathematics released in June 2010. They are the result of an initiative coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) aimed at ensuring that students across the country graduate high school prepared to succeed in college or in their careers. The CCS begins by identifying standards for every grade level, starting with kindergarten, with the goal that all students will be college ready by the time they graduate from high school.

          The development of the CCS was a state-led initiative that involved the collaboration of thousands of K-12 and postsecondary teachers, administrators, and educational experts from across the country. Kentucky became the first state to formally commit to adopting these new standards in February 2010, and as of July 2011, 43 states have formally committed to adopting these standards, with more states likely to follow soon.

          Why should I care about the implementation of these standards?

          The adoption of the CCS should lead to students entering college being more prepared for college coursework, which, in turn, should allow college faculty teaching introductory writing courses to spend less time on remediation and more time on honing advanced writing skills students will need to excel in college and in their careers.

          As the first state to adopt these standards, Kentucky is committed to the idea that the significant effort involved in the process of altering learning targets, and the teaching and assessment methods used to meet those targets, will result in high school students graduating more prepared for the work they will do in college and in their careers. As an educator working for a public university in the Commonwealth, it is important that you understand these new standards and how their implementation may impact your teaching.

          How should these standards affect my curriculum?

          While it will likely take several years for the full impact of the implementation of the new standards to be seen in college classrooms, some changes may be perceptible starting this year in Kentucky. As college educators taking the baton from K-12 teachers in the cooperative educational race to prepare our students to compete in a global economy, UofL writing faculty may need to update their curriculum to meet the following standards:

          · Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

          · Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

          In addition, instructors may want to more extensively integrate the following criteria into their 101 courses:

          · Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

          Finally, the adopting the CCS goes beyond simply establishing standards to also provide training to ensure K-12 teachers are equipped to help students meet these new standards. Specifically, K-12 educators are being trained in the use of formative assessments. College writing faculty may find out more about formative assessment in the Efiles.

          Where can I go for more information?

          1. Read the standards for each grade level. The grade specific and anchor standards for English Language Arts are listed on the Common Core State Standards Initiative Website: http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy.

          2. Discover how our learning outcomes align with these new standards. To find out how ENGL 101 and 102 learning outcomes align with the new College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards, please review the CCR/ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 Learning Outcomes Comparison Charts in Appendix K.

          3. Familiarize yourself with formative assessment techniques. Incorporating more formative assessment into the college curriculum would likely help our students meet our learning outcomes. For more information about the use of formative assessment in ENGL 101 and 102, please review the following: Formative Assessment Ideas in the Efiles.

          [1] Much of the information in this FAQ was derived from the Common Core State Standards Initiative website: http://www.corestandards.org/, and the Kentucky Department of Education website: http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/.

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          Policy Against the Use of Plagiarism Detection Software

          Composition Program Policy Against the Use of Plagiarism Detection Software

          Composition Program courses do not use plagiarism detection software, including the SafeAssign software available on Blackboard. The Composition Committee’s decision not to use such software in writing courses is based on several factors:

          We regard the teaching of writing with research, including citation practices, as a rhetorical act. Composition Program courses teach students how to interpret and analyze ideas from other sources and integrate those ideas into the students’ writing. We approach citation and bibliographic practices as rhetorical and critical thinking skills that are necessary to write effectively for a scholarly audience. The point of citing sources is to show for readers the “intellectual footprints” of your thinking. Plagiarism detection software, on the other hand, teaches students that the important issue is whether or not you get caught.

          The use of such a service for student writers begins from a presumption of guilt. If we tell students that their papers must go through such a service before we read them, whether we threaten immediate punishment or not, we are telling them that we do not trust them to act honorably. We also tell students that when it comes to writing with other sources, the emphasis is on avoiding plagiarism, not drawing from and synthesizing the ideas of others. We tell students that their writing is not their own and that we will turn the judgment of their writing over to computer software.

          The best deterrents to plagiarism are well-designed writing assignments that are distinctive to course material and involve effective writing pedagogy. Students asked to write something other than a canned assignment will find little worth downloading. Students asked to engage in pre-writing activities, such as notes, drafts, annotated bibliographies, and who are given instructor feedback on those activities before revising work for a final manuscript, are, among other pedagogical advantages, less likely to download work and easier to recognize when they do.  

          Research on plagiarism detection software such as SafeAssign and Turnitin indicates that such software can produce many inaccurate reports, finding plagiarism where it doesn’t exist and missing plagiarism that does. Such a high rate of false positives makes the software unreliable and may create more work for teachers and students, not less.

          The results of plagiarism detection software make make no distinction between plagiarism as a form of intentional cheating and students who are making mistakes in working with unfamiliar conventions of academic writing. The former is a matter for academic sanction. The latter is a matter for improved writing instruction across the disciplines, not just in first-year composition. Research indicates that such errors of quotation and citation (as well as errors of grammar) often increase as students move into new genres of writing, not just from high school to college but from one discipline to the next. Students need more discipline-specific instruction in how to use and attribute sources, not more punitive surveillance

          The use of plagiarism detection software creates a poisonous atmosphere between teacher and student. The message to students is that they are all potentially cheating and need to be watched. Research on plagiarism indicates that the majority of instances result from student error, not student dishonesty. The message of such software, however, is that the citing of sources should be done to avoid plagiarism, not for intellectual and rhetorical purposes. Such an approach makes adversaries of teachers and students, instead of collaborators. It creates a prison culture of guards and the guarded, a cat-and-mouse game of detection and mistrust where the fear of being caught can also breed a desire to get around the rules.

          Further reading and resources:

          Carbone, Nick. “Turnitin.com, a Pedagogic Placebo for Plagiarism.” 2001.
          http://bedfordstmartins.com/technotes/techtiparchive/ttip060501.htm

          Carbone, Nick. “Thinking and Talking About Plagiarism” 2001.
          http://bedfordstmartins.com/technotes/techtiparchive/ttip102401.htm

          Council of Writing Program Administrators. “Defining and Avoiding Plagiarism: The WPA Statement on Best Practices” http://www.wpacouncil.org/node/9

          Jaschik, Scott. “False Positives on Plagiarism” Inside Higher Education.
          http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/03/13/detect

          Howard, Rebecca Moore. “Plagiarisms, Authorships, and the Academic Death Penalty.” College English 57.7 1995: 708-36.

          Howard, Rebecca Moore. “Should Educators Use Commercial Services to Combat Plagiarism? No.” CQ Researcher 13.32. 2003: 789.

          Howard, Rebecca Moore. Standing in the Shadow of Giants: Plagiarists, Authors, Collaborators. Stamford, CT: Ablex, 1999.

          Jaschik, Scott. “False Positives on Plagiarism” Inside Higher Education. 2009.
          http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/03/13/detect

          Valentine, Kathryn. “Plagiarism as Literacy Practice: Recognizing and Rethinking Ethical Binaries.” College Composition and Communication. 58.1 (2006): 89-109.

          Williams, Bronwyn T. “Trust, Betrayal, and Authorship: Plagiarism and How We
          Perceive Students” Literacy and Identity Column. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy.  51.4 2007 350-354.

          updated 03/09

          Printing in LL15 Basement Lab

          First, familiarize yourself with the department's printing and photocopying policies, effective August 2008. Note that printing in the lab is only intended for instructional purposes and that you are allotted 75 pages of printing per semester.

           

          To print from a computer in the basement lab, follow these steps.

          1. Logon to a computer with your ULink user id and password.

          2. Open your Word, PDF, etc. document.

          3. Click File-->Print

          4. Select a printer and click OK to print

          5. IMPORTANT! LOG OUT YOUR COMPUTER WHEN YOU'RE DONE, SO YOU WILL NOT INCUR OTHERS' CHARGES.

           

          If you have any questions about this, please see an assistant director of composition.

          Entering Grades

          LOGIN with your ULINK ID and PASSWORD: You may access your class rosters from PeopleSoft by logging in at: http://ulink.louisville.edu. Your account and password are the same as what you use to access your pay stub. If you are unsure about your PeopleSoft account or password, please read the information provided under the "For first-time users" link on the ULink log on page.

          1. ONCE YOU LOG ON: For grades: Click on Faculty/Staff Services tab (across the top), go to the menu item, "Academics," then click on "Record Grades."
          Select the term by clicking on the appropriate choice. You will then see a list of your classes for that term. Click on the roster you wish to grade or the class list you wish to view.

          Entering Grades:

          1. Enter grades by directly typing them in the Grade Input Box, or by using the lookup button next to the box to choose from a list of valid grades.
          2. If you want to enter a partial list of grades, click on the save button at the end of the page. You may then return to the roster later to complete grade entry.
          3. When you complete grading, click on the save button.
          4. At this time you should make a final review of the grades. Enter your changes and click on the save button.
          5. When you are satisfied that all grades are appropriately entered and Saved, change the approval status to Approved and click on the save button again at the bottom of the page.
          6. To change a grade on an approved roster, move the status marker back to Not Reviewed, enter your changes, and click on the Saved button. Then change the roster status marker back to Approved and click on the Save button again.
          7. Approved rosters are posted several times a day, after which the roster no longer shows an Approval Status box or grade input column. Any changes to grades after this point must go through your school's normal channels for grade changes. Students can access posted grades by web or phone.

          Course Description

          Submitting a course description is a necessary and required component of your course assignment. Composition instructors at U of L offer student a diverse and rich range of course topics and pedagogies. Thus, we also wish to offer students the opportunity to choose a course that fits with their particular interests.

          UG Composition courses ENGL101, 102, 105, 303, 306, 309 to Linda Baldwin: llbald01@louisville.edu
          UG 200-500 level courses (excluding Comp) to Heather Huber: hlwill01@louisville.edu
          GR 500-600 level courses to :

          If you need further assistance posting your course description, any one of the program’s ADCs would be happy to help.
          If you experience problems with this process, email an ADC at ADCquery@louisville.edu.




          How to user the scanner in the basement lab

          Using Adobe Acrobat Professional to Scan a Document

          Please Note – These directions are for the LL15 scanner closest to the computer classroom. The software for the two scanners is very similar, but not exactly the same. Using these instructions and a little intuition with the other scanner should guide you through the process successfully.

          These instructions begin following the placing of your text on the scanner:

          1. Open Adobe Acrobat Professional on the DesktoP

          2. Click on the “Create PDF” icon in the menu bar

          3. When the “Create PDF from Scanner” Menu “pops-up,” click “Scan"

          • Choose the “From Scanner” Option

          4. Select the “Advanced Tab” on the “ScanGear CS” Options Menu

          • The Advanced Tab allows you to change the default settings. The following options may be applicable to your job:
          • Paper Size – Full Platen: Allows for Scanning Objects larger than “letter size.”
          • Color Mode – Grayscale is recommended, unless you want a color scan. “Black and White” will not produce a printable document.
          • Output Resolution – 300dpi (default) is recommended to produce a readable printed document.

          5. Once you have selected the settings, click the “preview” button in the upper-right hand corner.

          • Preview allows you to see an image of what will be scanned, as well as allowing you to edit/crop the scanned image.
          • One useful edit is to “crop out” the black edges by moving the dotted border lines.

          6. When you are happy with the image, press the “Scan” button.

          • Scan with the “lid” down to produce the best image

          7. When the pop-up Menu appears, click “Next” to scan another page or “Done” if this is your last page.

          • IMPORTANT – you must reset any output settings (such as Color Mode) for each scanned page.

          8. After clicking done, your PDF will be processed and appear on the screen. Please remember to save the PDF or your hard work may  be lost.

          Pedagogy Workshops

          Pedagogy Workshops

          Upcoming Pedagogy Workshops

          Spring 2010 Workshops are currently being developed.

           

          Previous Workshops

          (10.4.09) "Workshop on English 102 Textbooks

          Video:

          Part 1:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRXKGMIRPUY (Eric Leake discusses his use of Joseph Harris' Rewriting in English 102)

          Part 2:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBB4H5cAsMY(Sue Ann Compton discusses her use of  Sunstein and  Chiseri-Strater's Filedworking)

          Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEyU0qR4SFE (Matt Dowell discusses his use of Min-Zhan Lu and Bruce Horner's Writing Conventions)

          Part 4:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FceNHLThq3I (Joan D'Antoni discusses her topical approach to writing projects in English 102)

          ____________________________________________________________________________________

          (9.30.09) "Working with Blogs and Wikis in the Composition Classroom" with Ryan Trauman and Shyam Sharma

          Video:

          Part 1:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOJ9YLvk1LY (Trauman discusses potential benefits of blogging in the comp classroom)

          Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2zKwiLazAE (Trauman presents two model blog assignments)

          Part 3:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTVggdi0BFA (Shyam introduces key features of wikis)

          Part 4:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwANRJOosZ8 (Shyam presents examples of classroom wikis)

          Supplemental Materials:

          Powerpoint presentation for Parts 1 & 2 (Trauman)

          Handout for Parts 1 & 2 (Trauman)

          Powerpoint presentation for Parts 3 & 4 (Sharma)

          Handout for Parts 3 & 4 (Sharma)

          Document Actions

          The Composition Classroom

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.presentation icon Blogging in the Composition Classroom.pptx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.presentation, 83 KB (85891 bytes)

          Blog Handout

          Rich Text Format (RTF) icon Blog Handout.rtf — Rich Text Format (RTF), 20 KB (20918 bytes)

          Wiki Workshop

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Wiki Workshop.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 19 KB (19882 bytes)

          Wiki Workshop -ppt

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.presentation icon Wiki Workshop.pptx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.presentation, 51 KB (52922 bytes)

          Policies for Canceling Class

          If you must cancel a class due to illness, an emergency, or some other unforeseen event, please do the following:

           

          1. Contact your students via e-mail.

          Please indicate to your students on the syllabus that they should have access to their UofL e-mail and either check that e-mail regularly or forward that e-mail to an account they do check regularly. You can then e-mail all your students using blackboard. Instructions for e-mail students via blackboard.

           

          2. Contact Linda Baldwin at 502-852-6896.

          Linda will put a note about the cancellation on your classroom door and record the cancellation in the department's log in case students come to the composition office looking for you.

           

          3. If you teach at 8AM,

          please chose a "cancelation buddy"-- another instructor in the department who teaches at 8AM. Exchange home and/or cell phone numbers with your buddy in the event that you need to cancel your classes but cannot reach Linda early enough. This should avoid instances of someone leaving Linda a message requesting that she cancel an 8AM class on a day when she is not in the office by 8.

           

          If Linda is out of the office for the day, please call the English department at 502-852-6801.

          Over-enrollment Policy

          Over-enrollment Policy

          (revised August 08)

          If you chose to remain on the wait list for a Composition Program course until the list closes, you will not be able to over enroll in the course unless you are a graduating senior. Individual instructors are not able to over enroll students in their courses.

          Students may only apply to over enroll in Composition Program courses if they are graduating seniors and need the course to graduate in the semester that they wish to over enroll. Graduating seniors who wish to enroll in a course that is full should first attempt to place their names on the electronic waiting list for the course.

          Once the waiting list closes, if the graduating senior has not been enrolled in the course, the student should obtain documentation of this status from the student's academic advisor and bring it to the Composition Program Office in Humanities 315C.

          Plagiarism Policy

          From UofL's Student Handbook, Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities, Section 5E

          Plagiarism:

          Representing the words or ideas of someone else as one’s own in any academic exercise, such as:

          1. Submitting as one’s own a paper written by another person or by a commercial “ghost writing” service,

          2. Exactly reproducing someone else’s words without identifying the words with quotation marks or by appropriate indentation, or without properly citing the quotation in a footnote or reference.

          3. Paraphrasing or summarizing someone else’s work without acknowledging the source with a footnote or reference.

          4. Using facts, data, graphs, charts, or other information without acknowledging the source with a footnote or reference. Borrowed facts or information obtained in one’s research or reading must be acknowledged unless they are “common knowledge”. Clear examples of “common knowledge” include the names of leaders of prominent nations, basic scientific laws, and the meaning of fundamental concepts and principles in a discipline. The specific audience for which a paper is written may determine what can be viewed as “Common knowledge”: for example, the facts commonly known by a group of chemists will differ radically from those known by a more general audience.

          Students should check with their teachers regarding what can be viewed as “common knowledge” within a specific field or assignment, but often the student will have to make the final judgment.

          When in doubt, footnotes or references should be used.

          Feel free to recommend and consult the following resources from UofL’s Writing Center: 

          Videos

          Writing with Sources: Quoting, Summarizing, Paraphrasing

          Writing with Sources: Avoiding Plagiarism 

          Handouts

          Using Sources

          Plagiarism 

          Writing FAQs

          How can I avoid plagiarizing?

          What is the difference between quotation, paraphrase, and summary?

          Printing Policies

          Photocopying/Printing Policies as of August 25, 2008:

          Hello,

          I am forwarding the new photocopying and printing policies set down by the Technology Committee. I know some of you have already seen these but I want to make certain everyone has seen them and fully understands their implications. As a point of information, I was informed that the limit for Comp Courses was set lower than other courses because we don't give midterms and finals.

          I understand these limits are going to be difficult and I sympathize but we simply have to live with the situation this year and hope things improve next year. If you have questions about how the policy will work, please ask Linda or me and we'll do our best to find an answer. This is new to all of us.

          Finally, if you come across innovative ways to limit photocopying or printing other than the ones on the attachment, please don't keep it to yourself.

          Thanks for your patience.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          Copying

          As announced, all instructors will need to enter their individual numbers in order to use the copiers in 315 and 321. Code numbers have been set so that tenure-track and term faculty can use the 315 copier; gtas and ptls should use the 321 copier. If you are leaving materials to be copied, please leave your number for the Work-Study students to use.

          We are allotting each instructor 10 copies per student per semester for Composition classes and 20 copies per student per semester for all other classes. Please note that these numbers include syllabi, handouts, etc.

          Tenure-track faculty, who are required to do research and engage in professional activity, will be allotted an additional 75 copies per semester.

          In all cases, copies that exceed the limit will cost the instructor $.05 per page. The same charge obtains for personal copies.

          We recognize that these numbers will not suffice for extraordinary cases (as when one turns in a book manuscript). Please email petitions for exceptions to Melissa Perkins, who will forward them to the Chair for decision.

          Printing

          Gtas and ptls will be allotted 75 pages of printing per semester.

          Faculty will be allotted 1 toner cartridge per year (2 ink jets, if you have an ink jet printer).

          Programs

          Staff for each program will reduce copying and printing wherever possible. Each program will set a goal for the semester.

          Personnel Materials

          There will be a separate code for the copying of materials for merit, promotion, and tenure files.

          Guidelines & Suggestions

          • Consider handing out an abbreviated syllabus and referring students to detailed information on Blackboard.
          • Use a smaller font and margins when appropriate.
          • Use two-sided paper whenever possible (this does not save on the number of copies, but it does save on paper).
          • Use BlackBoard as much as possible: for additional syllabus information, announcements, readings, etc.
          • Use pdfs rather than copies. Work-study students will continue to create pdfs in 315. For those who would like to learn how to create pdfs themselves, we will be scheduling sessions on learning how to create pdfs; there is also training available at the Delphi Center.
          • If you are teaching in a “smart” classroom, consider putting quiz questions, etc. onscreen, instead of handing out copies.
          • Remember to logout of copiers & printers, so that your account is not charged for other people’s copies.
          • The Department does not support printing or copying by students for classes. This means that, for example, your students should be making their own copies for workshops and that graduate students may not use Department machines or materials to print or copy for classes they are taking.
          • Think twice before printing emails, announcements, etc.

          Professional Development Observations

          Professional Development Observations of Composition Classes Taught by Part-Time Lecturers and Graduate Teaching Assistants

          Purpose

          The primary goal of teaching observations in the Composition Program is to support all instructors in developing more effective teaching strategies. The observation process should be a constructive dialogue between the observer and the instructor being observed. This Composition Program values a variety of approaches to teaching writing and regards this process as a way for teachers to reflect on and articulate the teaching philosophies and strategies that shape their work.

          The secondary goal of the observation process is to fulfill accreditation requirements about evaluations of non-tenure-line teaching faculty. Observation reports, along with student evaluations and course syllabi, will be kept on file in the Composition Program office for this purpose.

          Observation Schedule

          For GTAs, during the first year of teaching, there will be:

          ●      One informal observation in the fall semester by an Assistant Director of Composition

          ●      One formal observation in the spring semester by the Director of Composition, which will result in a written evaluation

          After the first year of teaching, there will be:

          ●      One observation in the second year of teaching at UofL

          ●      One observation in the third year of teaching at UofL

          ●      After the third year, observations will occur at the request of the instructor or at the discretion of the Director of Composition

          Note: PhD students going on the job market are encouraged to be observed by their dissertation directors.

          For PTLs, there will be:

          ●      One observation in the first year of teaching at UofL by the Director of Composition in the Fall term

          ●      One observation in the second year teaching at UofL

          ●      One observation in the third year of teaching at UofL

          ●      After the third year, observations will take place at the request of the instructor or at the discretion of the Director of Composition

          Additional Observations

          The Director of Composition may conduct an additional teaching observation at the request of the instructor, or if the initial observer notes classroom behavior that is of concern, or if other information (student complaints, changes in student evaluations, problems with syllabi, etc.) warrants an additional visit. If the Director of Composition decides on an additional teaching observation, she or he will notify the instructor in writing and meet with the instructor before the observation to discuss any concerns.

          Observation Process

          Before the observation

          ●      The observer will contact the instructor to arrange a pre-observation meeting and to schedule the classroom visit. The observer will initiate the observation and will work with the instructor to schedule an appropriate time to conduct the observation. Prior to the observation, the instructor may send the observer an email containing the lesson plans for the class that is to be observed (at the request of either the instructor or the observer).

          During the observation

          ●      The observer will attend the class session agreed upon with the instructor and stay for the entire class session.

          ●      The observer will take notes on the class session using the Composition Instructor Observation Template (see below).

          After the observation

          ●      The observer will be required to meet with the instructor after the class session to discuss the observations and ask any questions about the class. The goal of these meetings is a constructive dialogue about pedagogy.

          ●      The observer will complete an observation report using the Instructor Observation Template (below) and will send a copy of this report to the instructor within 3 weeks (21 days) of the actual observation--or by the end of the last day of the semester. The report must include the observer’s name, the instructor’s name, and the date and time of the observation as well as detailed information about the class session under observation.

          ●      The observer will email a copy of the form to the instructor and to Linda Baldwin at llbald01@louisville.edu.

          ●      The instructor has the option to write a response to accompany the report in the files; if instructors choose to write such a response, they must do so within 2 weeks of the date of the observation report. Once any response has been made available to the observer, the report will be turned in to the Composition Program office and reviewed by the Director.

          Click here to download Observation Template for face-to-face courses

          Click here to download observation procedures and template for online courses

          Observation Template

          Course Observations for English 101 and 102

          Questions for the Observation

          The goal of Course observations should be to describe a class session and related class materials in order to give suggestions for improvement. You might keep the following questions in mind as you conduct the observation:

          1. How did the instructor clarify the goals and purposes of class discussions and activities to students? Is there anything the instructor could do to better communicate why students are being asked to do particular activities and assignments?

          2. How will the activities you observed help students become better academic writers? Are there ways that the instructor could make the class more focused on activities that will help students with writing in their other college classes?

          3. How did the instructor engage students in discussion? Are there strategies that the instructor could better utilize to facilitate discussions?

          4. How did the instructor keep students focused and engaged for the class session? Are there strategies that the instructor could use to keep students better focused?

          Again, the focus on the observation should be less on offering an evaluation of someone’s teaching and instead making some constructive suggestions. For example, some common suggestions are

          • Repeat comments back or ask students to speak up so that the whole class can hear discussion
          • Increase or decrease the length of certain activities—or use a different mix of activities
          • Make better use of the chalkboard or classroom technology
          • Explain how individual class activities relate to larger class goals
          • Spend more time discussing rhetorical strategies in assigned texts
          • List assignment goals and evaluation criteria on course materials

          You should also try to sit in the back of the room when you observe so you can let the instructor know if content is both audible and visible from far away and if students appear to be on task during class discussions and activities.

          Pre-Observation Activities:

          1. The observer and instructor should agree upon a date for the observation.

          2. Instructors should send a copy of the course syllabus, assignment instruction sheets, and other materials to the observer.

          3. Instructors should communicate to the observer (either in email or in a face-to-face meeting) their overall goals for the course and their top goals for the class period that the observer will be attending.

          After the observation:

          1. If possible, meet face-to-face with the instructor to review strengths and brainstorm suggestions for improvement.

          2. Include your name, the instructor’s name, and the date and time of the observation in your report.

          3. Email a copy of your observation to the instructor and to Linda Baldwin at llbald01@louisville.edu.

          Instructors will have an opportunity to respond to your comments.

          Download this template as a Microsoft Word file.

          Observation Template

          Microsoft Word Document icon Observation_Template_revised4.doc — Microsoft Word Document, 37 KB (38400 bytes)

          Contacting Students Through Blackboard

          Directions for e-mail students using Blackboard.

          1. Go to UofL's Blackboard site.

          2. Click on "User Login" and log in with your university ID and password.

          3. Click on the course that you are cancelling.

          4. Click on "Communication" in the left-hand navigation menu

          5. Click "Send email"

          6. Click "All users"

          7. Enter your email subject line and message.

          8. Scroll to the bottom of the page and press the "Submit" button.

          Comp News Weekly Archives

          archives, beginning with January 7, 2008:

          April 20, 2009

          Hello,

          This will be last Composition News of the semester, and the last of my tenure as Director of Composition. Once again I want to thank everyone for an excellent semester. And once again I want to say how grateful and impressed I am every year with the dedication to student learning shown by instructors in this program. It has been a pleasure working with you and I wish you all clear sailing with your grading and a good summer ahead.

          Now to business....there are seven items today but they cover important end-of-semester information so please read them and let me or Linda know if you have questions.

          1) Grades: Once you have posted your grades online, you must turn a hard copy of your grades in to Linda Baldwin. We need these in case there are technical problems in the Registrar's Office as well as for our own records. Directions for posting your grades are in the Comp Program Handbook and on the bulletin board above the copier in the Comp Office.

          2) Portfolio Storage: Any portfolios you do not return to your students must be stored for one year in the storage room at the back of 4F. There are detailed instructions on how to prepare your portfolios on the door of the storage room and a portfolio storage work area with necessary supplies of labels and tape in the kitchen behind 4H. Please follow these directions so that Linda can easily access student portfolios when she needs to. If you have questions, please contact Linda.

          3) Evaluations: Student evaluations must be completed by the last regular day of class (April 22). Please follow the instructions in the evaluation packet.

          4) E-Files: People from outside our program, whether across campus or at other universities, are very impressed with the idea of the E-Files Teaching Writing database. I think because we have this resources here we tend to take it for granted. But E-Files can only be a helpful resources if the instructors in the program keep it alive. There is so much good teaching going on that others can benefit from, both new and more experienced instructors. I know I have found a number of things on E-Files I plan to use in the fall. So I ask you to post your favorite assignments and course syllabi on E-Files. It takes just seconds. If you have questions about how to post something on E-Files, please contact Tabetha Adkins (tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu) until the end of May.

          5) Copy Bills and Bonnie Library Books: If you received a bill for personal photocopying this semester, please settle that with Linda before the end of this semester. Please bring the bill with you. Also, if you have a Bonnie Library book checked out that you are not using please return that to Linda as well.

          6) Digital Writing Classrooms: If you want scheduling preference for one of these classrooms for fall please fill out the scheduling form (http://louisville.edu/english/composition/request-a-computer-classroom) by this Wednesday, April 22. Questions should be directed to Matt Dowell (mldowe01@louisville.edu).

          7) Book-in-Common Materials: Copies of the university book-in-common for 2009-2010, Luis Louis Alberto
          Urrea's The Devil's Highway, are available in the Bonnie Library. A list of teaching resources is available in the Composition Program Office.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          April 13, 2009

          Hello,

          First, let me thank those of you who had students participating in the
          Celebration of Student Writing. The event was lively and the students I
          spoke with seemed to enjoy the opportunity to talk about their work. We
          also learned a great deal in putting on this event that will make next
          year that much easier. I hope this will become an annual event and have
          the support of the Composition Program as is grows. My thanks to
          everyone who helped organize the Celebration and Matt Dowell in
          particular for all his hard work on the project.

          There are three items this week:

          1) Teaching Writing Workshop on the 2009 Book in Common: There will be
          lunch-time workshop on Friday (April 17) about ways to use the UofL 2009
          Book-in-Common in Composition Program Courses. The book is Louis Alberto
          Urrea*s Devil*s Highway, a nonfiction book about the experiences of
          illegal immigrants trying to enter the U.S. from Mexico. It is a
          compelling and balanced book that could work well in many ways in a
          writing course. During the workshop we will discuss ideas for how people
          might use the book. The Workshop will be from 12:00-1:00 in Ekstrom
          Library, Room W210. There will be lunch so RSVP Ryan Trauman
          (rwtrau01@louisville.edu) by 1pm on Thursday (4/16) if you plan on
          attending, or if you have questions.

          2) Digital Writing Classroom Scheduling: To schedule a Digital Writing
          Classroom use the form found at
          http://louisville.edu/english/composition/request-a-computer-classroom.
          Requests made by April 22 will receive preference in scheduling.
          Questions should be directed to Matt Dowell (mldowe01@louisville.edu).

          3) Course Evaluations: Course evaluation packets are available in 4H.
          Be sure to distribute these before the end of the semester. Also please
          follow the instructions in the packet. If you have questions contact
          Linda Baldwin.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          April 6, 2009

          1) Celebration of Student Writing: The Celebration of Student Writing takes place Wednesday from 11-2 in the first floor meeting room in the Belknap Research Building. Please encourage your students to come and please make a point of coming by yourself to support the students who will be displaying their work. The students involved in this event have worked very hard and deserve an appreciative audience. Thanks.

          2) Course Descriptions: Course descriptions for summer and fall courses should be posted immediately so students and advisers may make use of them during registration. Our course descriptions can only be useful to students, and to us, if we have them posted. I will be checking the list later today and contacting anyone who has not yet posted descriptions.
          Step-by-step instructions on how to post your course descriptions can be found at:
          http://louisville.edu/english/department-filing-cabinet/course-descriptions.html

          3) Part-Time Lecturer Contracts: The contracts will be placed in your campus mailboxes this week.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          March 30, 2009

          Hello,

          I know that the last four weeks of the semester are an extremely busy time for everyone, but please take a moment to read through the items below so that you're sure to get all the information you need for the end of the semester.

          There are eight items this week:

          1) Course Assignments for Fall 09: Course assignment letters were placed in your mailbox last Friday. If you have an unavoidable conflict with your schedule please contact me as soon as possible. For anyone who did not receive as many courses as requested, be assured I will continue to look for openings for fall teaching. If you did not receive a course assignment letter, please contact Linda Baldwin right away.

          2) Textbook Fair: Our annual Textbook Fair takes place Wednesday, April 1 from 10-2 in Humanities 300. Now that you have your course assignment, drop by to see what books, online content, and other materials publishers have to offer. And there will be free lunch and snacks available.

          3) Writing Pedagogy Workshop on Textbook Selection: In anticipation of the Textbook Workshop there will be an open discussion of what books people choose for their writing courses and how they use them. One of the real strengths of our program is the variety of books people choose and the innovative teaching they do with those texts. So come on Tuesday, March 31 at 12:30 in Humanities 300 for this brown-bag event and join the conversation.

          4) Celebration of Student Writing Deadline: As I mentioned in my email last week I have extended the deadline for indicating participation in the Celebration of Student Writing until Wednesday, April 1. Please let Matt Dowell know as soon as you can. The event will take place Wednesday, April 8 from 11-2 in the Belknap Research Building. A list of Frequently Asked Questions about participating in the even can be found at:
          http://louisville.edu/english/composition/celebration-of-student-writing-faqs.html . My thanks to all of you who have contacted me in the past few days and your willingness to participate in this event.

          5) Digital Writing Classroom Scheduling: The Digital Writing Classrooms (formerly known as CAI classrooms) are available for scheduling for Summer and Fall courses. To schedule a classroom use the form found at
          http://louisville.edu/english/composition/request-a-computer-classroom. Requests made by April 22 will receive preference in scheduling. Please remember that every semester more and more people want to use these classrooms and yet we still only have two available so try to be flexible in your requests. Questions should be directed to Matt Dowell (mldowe01@louisville.edu).

          6) Digital Writing Resources Page: A new Digital Writing Resources page is now available at:
          http://louisville.edu/english/composition/digital-writing-resources.html. This information available on this page is still under construction, but it is the place to go to schedule classrooms and find information and resources for teaching with digital technology. The University will pull the old Computer Assisted Instruction pages as of April 1.

          7) Incompletes: Remember, any Incomplete given in the Fall 2008 semester must be completed by the end of this semester or the grade automatically changes to an "F". Also remember that I must approve Incompletes before they are given to students.

          8) I will not be in the office this Thursday and Friday as I will be out of town on a personal matter.

          Have a great week.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          March 23, 2009

          Hello,

          Welcome back from break. I hope everyone is ready for a busy, but productive, final month of classes.

          There are five items this week.

          1) Celebration of Student Writing: Please let Matt Dowell know by Wednesday (March 25) if you plan to have students participate in this event. We just need a ballpark figure at this point. If you need help with organizing student participation, contact me or Matt. Again, we want this to be a good opportunity for students and the program so please take part.

          2) Textbook Fair: Our annual Composition Program Textbook Fair is scheduled for Wednesday, April 1 from 10-2 in Humanities 300. You will have your fall courses scheduled by that time so this is a great opportunity to get ideas for the books you might adopt for your classes. Book orders for summer and fall courses are due to Linda Baldwin by April 13.

          3) Textbook Pedagogy Workshop: In anticipation of the Textbook Fair there will be a workshop on choosing and using textbooks in our courses on Tuesday, March 31. We have such a wonderful diversity of pedagogical approaches reflected in our variety of textbook choices. This is an opportunity to learn what other people are doing with their textbook choices, talk about your own ideas and choices, and see how people are using a wide variety of books in exciting and innovative ways. This is a real strength of our program that we can build on. The time and place of the workshop will be announced soon.

          4) Course Scheduling: We will be putting the Fall schedule together later this week. If any information has changed from what you put on your preference sheet, please let Linda Baldwin know as soon as possible.

          5) Book-in-Common Open House: The University Book-In-Common for 2009-2010 will be Luis Urrea's The Devil's Highway. A kickoff open house to get more information about the book will take place today from 204 in room W210 in Ekstrom Library.

          I hope the week goes well for everyone.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          March 9, 2009

          Hello,

          There are five items this week:

          1) Preference Sheets: Scheduling Preference sheets are due this Thursday (March 12).

          2) Textbook Fair: Our annual Composition Program Textbook Fair is scheduled for Wednesday, April 1 from 10-2 in Humanities 300. You will have your fall courses scheduled by that time so this is a great opportunity to get ideas for the books you might adopt for your classes. Book orders for summer and fall courses are due to Linda Baldwin by April 13.

          3) Textbook Pedagogy Workshop: In anticipation of the Textbook Fair there will be a workshop on choosing and using textbooks in our courses on Tuesday, March 31. We have such a wonderful diversity of pedagogical approaches reflected in our variety of textbook choices. This is an opportunity to learn what other people are doing with their textbook choices, talk about your own ideas and choices, and see how people are using a wide variety of books in exciting and innovative ways. This is a real strength of our program that we can build on. The time and place of the workshop will be announced soon.

          4) Celebration of Student Writing: Please let Matt Dowell know by March 25 if you plan to have students participate in this event. I invited the Dean the other day and will be doing the same for the President and Provost, etc. so I hope we have a big turnout. Thanks.

          4) 4Cs: I will be gone to 4Cs the rest of the week as will the ADCs (Tabetha, Matt and Trauman) so undoubtedly things will run more smoothly.

          Have a good rest of the week and a good break.
          Best,
          Bronwyn

          March 2, 2009

          Hello,

          There are four items this week:

          1) Scheduling Preference Sheets for Fall 09: Scheduling Preference sheets are due back to Linda Baldwin by Thursday, March 12. If you have not received a preference sheet but want to teach in the fall, you need to see Linda right away.

          2) Last Day to Withdraw From a Course: The last day to withdraw from a course without penalty is this Wednesday, March 4. Please remind your students of this deadline. Also remember that, before this deadline, the Provost's Office asks that we make sure students have received sense of their grade in the class.

          3) Celebration of Student Writing: You will be receiving fliers about the Celebration of Student Writing in the next week. I hope everyone will seriously consider having students participate in this event that will allow them to present their work to the University community. We are willing to help if we can to make this possible for your students. Matt Dowell has lots of resources and ideas about how to make this productive for your students and as easy as possible for you. We need a sense by March 25 of how many students from your classes you think will participate. If you have questions please contact Matt or me. This can be an exciting event for students, instructors, and the program, but only if people get involved.

          4) Literacy Narrative Archive: Cindy Selfe at Ohio State University is creating an national archive of literacy narratives. We have agreed to help collect literacy stories for their "Everybody Has a Literacy Story...Tell Us Yours!" project. There are looking for any stories, large or small, that have to do with reading, writing, or composing (or the teaching of reading, writing, or composing) from students and teachers. So we will be collecting these stories from anyone who wants to participate. We will accept written narratives (in electronic form) or there will be recording table to do audio or video stories at the Celebration of Student Writing. I will send more detailed information about this out later in the week, but this is another great opportunity for students and teachers to contribute work to an exciting project. If you have questions, see me.

          Have a good week,

          Bronwyn

          February 23, 2009

          Hi,

          There are two items this week:

          1) Scheduling Preference Sheets for Fall 09 Classes: As you may have already noticed, the Scheduling Preference Sheets for Fall 09 have been placed in your mailboxes. These need to be filled out and returned to Linda Baldwin by the end of business on Thursday, March 12. I ask you to remember that, while we always do our best to meet scheduling requests, we inevitably have to ask people to be flexible and make compromises. Consequently, the more flexibility you can indicate on your preference sheet the more it helps us. Also, be aware that we are given very few T-Th sections and almost no T-Th sections that meet in the middle of the dayPlease fill them out completely, even if your information has not changed, because we need to have that in front of us to do the current scheduling.

          If you have any questions about filling out the sheets, how the scheduling process works, or anything else involving scheduling let me know. If you received a preference sheet and don't expect to be teaching in
          Fall 09, or if you did not receive a preference sheet and do want to
          teach in Fall 09, please contact Linda Baldwin.

          2) Celebration of Student Writing Pedagogy Brown-Bag Workshop. Matt Dowell will lead a pedagogy workshop today that will focus on connecting classroom assignments with the Celebration of Student Writing. The Celebration is scheduled for April 8. The brown-bag lunch workshop will take place from 11-12:30 in Humanities 300. The plan for the workshop is to discuss ways to integrate classroom assignments into successful Celebration presentations such as poster presentations. If anyone has experience with poster presentations contact Matt (mldowe01@louisville.edu).

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          February 16, 2009

          Hi,

           

          I am back from jury duty and will get to all the pending requests people have for appointments and such as soon as I can, but a couple of other things have come up so it may not be this week. I thank you for your patience.

           

          Here is the week's news:

           

          1) Summer Teaching: Several people have inquired about the possibility of summer teaching. Although it will be a couple of weeks until Susan Ryan and I get to the scheduling for summer, if you are interested in teaching a Composition Program course this summer, please send me a brief email telling me your preference in terms of course and summer session. If you are a GTA and request a literature course from Susan and a Composition course from me, Susan and I will figure out the best fit for the courses that need to be scheduled. If you are a part-time lecturer, please be aware that GTAs are now on 12-month contracts that require them to teach in the summer. Consequently, once the GTAs have been scheduled, there will be very few sections available. If you have questions please let me know.

           

          2) Celebration of Student Writing Pedagogy Workshop. Matt Dowell will lead a pedagogy workshop on Monday, February 23 that will focus on connecting classroom assignments with the Celebration of Student Writing. The Celebration is scheduled for April 8. The work shop will take place from 11-12:30 in Humanities 300. The plan for the workshop is to discuss ways to integrate classroom assignments into successful Celebration presentations such as poster presentations. If anyone has experience with poster presentations contact Matt (mldowe01@louisville.edu).

           

          3) Incomplete Grade Status: If you gave a student an Incomplete in Fall Semester 2008, the student must complete that work and you must get the grade to the Registrar's office by April 30, 2009. If the grade is not entered by that time the student will automatically receive an "F".

           

          Best,

           

          Bronwyn

          February 10, 2009

          Hi,

          My apologies for being a day late, but I take shelter in the glacial
          workings of the Jefferson County judicial system. I will be on jury duty
          the rest of the week.

          There are two items this week:

          1. Celebration of Student Writing Pedagogy Workshop. Matt Dowell will
          lead a pedagogy workshop on Monday,
          February 23 that will focus on connecting classroom assignments with
          the Celebration of Student Writing. The Celebration is scheduled for
          April 8. The work shop will take place from 11-12:30 in Humanities 300.
          The plan for the workshop is to discuss ways to integrate classroom
          assignments into successful Celebration presentations such as poster
          presentations. If anyone has experience with poster presentations
          contact Matt (mldowe01@louisville.edu).

          2. Assistant Director of Composition Openings for 2009-2010: There are
          openings for two Assistant Directors of Composition for next year and
          for one person to be the Assistant Director of Composition for Business
          Writing. I am pasting the text of the ads below, which include the
          application deadlines. They will also be posted in the Composition
          Program office. If you have questions about the positions or the
          process, let me know.

          Best,

          Bronwyn



          Assistant Director of Composition Openings


          There are two Assistant Director of Composition positions open for
          doctoral GTAs. Assistant Director appointments are for one year with the
          option of a second year available. The positions begin during the summer
          of 2009. Each assistant director receives a course release in both the
          fall and spring semesters and is paid a stipend for summer ADC work.
          Applicants must have taken English 602 and have taught at least one
          course in the Composition Program.

          Duties of an Assistant Director include:
          Mentoring new writing teachers
          Collaborating on English 602 (Teaching College Composition)
          Mediating student and teacher grievances
          Scheduling courses
          Determining exemption and transfer credit
          Planning and facilitating professional development workshops
          Creating and maintaining the composition program web pages
          Scheduling computer classrooms
          Providing pedagogical support and mentoring for teaching digital
          literacies


          Summer duties may include reading incoming student portfolios for
          credit exemption, assisting in the design of orientation for both new
          GTAs and the entire composition program, collaborating in the planning
          of English 602, assisting summer instructors with courses, and other ADC
          duties.

          To apply, please submit, by email, a letter of application outlining
          your qualifications and a current CV to Joanna Wolfe by 9:00 a.m. March
          23. Applicants will be asked to participate in an interview with the
          Joanna and current Assistant Directors and decisions will be made by
          April 1. If you have any questions about these positions, please contact
          Joanna, Bronwyn Williams, Tabetha Adkins, Matt Dowell, or Ryan Trauman.




          Assistant Director of Composition * Business Writing


          The Assistant Director of Composition * Business Writing position is
          open for doctoral GTAs. Assistant Director appointments are for one year
          with the option of a second year available. The position begins in Fall
          2009. The assistant director receives a course release in both the fall
          and spring semesters. Applicants must have taught at least one semester
          of English 306.

          Duties of the Assistant Director * Business Writing include:
          Tutoring students in the School of Business
          Working with School of Business faculty on integrating writing into
          courses
          Coordinating Business Writing curriculum with the School of Business
          Conducting writing presentations in School of Business classes
          Maintaining a Business Writing web page
          Working with School of Business faculty on their writing projects


          To apply, please submit, by email, a letter of application outlining
          your qualifications and a current CV to Joanna Wolfe
          (joanna.wolfe@louisville.edu) by the 9:00 a.m. March 23. Applicants
          will also partic
          ipate in an interview with Joanna and the current
          Assistant Director. If you have any questions about this position,
          please contact Joanna, Bronwyn Williams, or Anne Heintzman.



          February 3, 2009

          Hello,

           

          I hope everyone is getting power back and lives back to normal.

           

          There is only one item this week:

           

          1) Snow Schedule: Several people have contacted me today asking if the University plans to add days to the semester to make up for the week we just missed. I have heard nothing about any changes to the calendar for the spring semester, so just adjust your courses as best you can given the weeks we have left.

           

          Just a reminder, I am on jury duty this week and next but am checking my email and checking in with Linda when I can.

           

          Best,

           

          Bronwyn

           

          January 26, 2009

           

          Hello,

           

          There are four announcements this week:

           

          1) Part-Time Lecturer Award Nominations: It is time for nominations for

          the Part-Time Lecturer Teaching Award for 2008-2009. All current

          Part-Time Lecturers are eligible to be nominated or self-nominated

          (except those who have received the award in the last three years).

          Part-Time Lecturers who are nominated will be asked to submit a teaching

          portfolio by the end of March. The Awards Committee includes the

          Director of Composition, an Assistant Director of Composition, and the

          previous year*s Part-Time Lecturer Award winner. The winner or winners

          of the award will be announced at the end of the Spring Semester and

          will share the $500 prize (provided by Gray*s Bookstore.). To nominate

          a Part-Time Lecturer for this award send a letter of nomination to me by

          Monday, March 2. More details about the award process can be found at:

          http://louisville.edu/english/composition/ptl-teaching-award.html .

          This is a great opportunity to recognize the excellent teaching going on

          in this program, so please get those nominations to me.

           

          2) Digital Writing Resources (formerly known as CAI): The webpage for

          scheduling and resources for the computer classrooms has been a casualty

          of the University's change in webpage formats. We are working to get a

          new page up and running, but in the meantime we cannot make changes to

          the online schedule for the computer classrooms. If you have a

          scheduling question or problem, please let Matt Dowell

          (mldowe01@louisville.edu) know.

           

          3) Celebration of Student Writing Workshop: There will be a teaching

          workshop on February 16 (time and room to be announced) about strategies

          for quick, in-class activities to help students who want to participate

          prepare their work for this even. Details will be coming soon.

           

          4) Out of the Office: I have been summoned for jury duty starting next

          Monday (Feb. 2). This means I may be out of the office from Feb. 2-13,

          or they may take one look at a left-wing academic like me and tell me to

          take a hike. But I have to assume I will be out of the office those two

          weeks doing my civic duty. I will do my best to keep up on pressing

          business through email, but trust that everything will run even better

          in my absence.

           

          Best,

           

          Bronwyn

          January 20, 2009

          Hello,

          I hope everyone had a good weekend.

          Two quick notes. First, Linda Baldwin is out sick today. We will try to have someone in the Composition Program Office during the day so people can use the copier. If the office is closed (and I'm not in my office) you can get someone from the main English Department office to let you in so you can make copies.

          Also, several people have asked if I have a problem with classes being let out to watch the inauguration, as if I would get in the way of students witnessing history. Not only don't I have a problem with it, but it seems a great opportunity to observe and then talk about rhetoric in action.

          There are three items this week:

          1) Teaching Writing Workshop: Linda Rogers, Tamara Yohannes, and Joan D'Antoni will lead a discussion on “Learning Disabilities in the Composition Classroom” on Wednesday, January 21 at noon in Hum. 300. Lunch will be served, so please RSVP to Ryan Trauman (rwtrau01@louisville.edu) by 2:00 today (Tuesday).

          2) Security in Basement Offices: If you are the last person to leave any of the rooms in the basement, even for a few minutes, please close the door behind you. Thanks.

          3) SAGE Referral System for Struggling Students: You may have seen the following message from the Provost's Office, but I want to paste it below. If you have students struggling in class this is another way to help them get resources that may help keep them in school.

          Undergraduate instructors interested in the retention of their students will want to consider using the SAGE module, which provides an automated university-wide early warning alert program. This intervention program can assist students to take stock of their academic performance and to change behaviors hindering their success.

          SAGE is a web-based module that allows instructors to create referrals with reasons and recommended actions for students at any time during the semester. A SAGE referral for a single student or for a group of students initiates a series of automated events. SAGE enables instructors to refer students experiencing academic or personal difficulty to a campus-wide support process. Unlike the early warning alert in Blackboard, a SAGE referral ensures referred students are contacted by university staff and offered assistance.

          Your student referrals could significantly improve the course success of your students and their retention at UofL. Please consider using SAGE for student referrals this semester.

          SAGE information sessions will be held on Jan. 21, 22 and on Feb. 18, 19 in Ekstrom Library. For times and locations see: http://www.reach.louisville.edu/SAGE/index.htm

          If you have any questions regarding SAGE, please contact Cathy Leist at 852-8105 or cwleis01@louisville.edu

          Detailed directions for making a SAGE referral are available at: http://www.reach.louisville.edu/SAGE/makeReferral.htm

          If you need technical assistance with making a referral, please contact 852-7530 or Greg Carmichael at: gdcarrm01@gwise.louisville.edu


          Have a good week,

          Bronwyn

          January 12, 2009

          Hello,

          There are four items this week:

          1) Instructor Information Sheets: Instructor Information sheets have been placed in your mailbox. Please fill these out and return them to Linda as soon as possible. We use these for contact and administrative
          information and they are more useful to us than you can know.

          2) Teaching Workshop: Linda Rogers will lead a workshop on teaching students with learning disabilities on Wednesday, January 21 from 12-1 in Humanities 300.

          3) Change in Photocopy Record Keeping: The new system of copy codes means that we no longer need to keep track of photocopies in the notebook in the Composition Office. The number of copies you make will be recorded automatically by the machine and you will have to pay for copies when you go over your allotted amount for the semester (20 copies per student). Final note: When you come to Room 321 to pay Linda for a copy or printing bill, please bring the bill with you.

          4) Part-Time Lecturer Professional Development Grants: Just a reminder that there is money available in for part-time lecturers for professional development (trips to conferences, purchases of books or software, etc). If you are interested in applying for such a grant, please see the web page:
          http://louisville.edu/english/composition/bonnie-part-time-lecturer-professional-development-grants.html.

          Have a good week,

          Bronwyn

           

          January 6, 2009

           

          Hello and welcome back,

           

          I hope that everyone had a restful and good break. There are a number of items to start the year, but they are important and appreciate your attention to them. I also want to remind everyone that these emails and other program news and announcements are posted on CompPost

          (http://louisville.edu/english/composition/comppost.html

          )

           

          1. Syllabus Copies: Please turn in a copy of your syllabus to Linda Baldwin by Friday of this week. Remember that we have changed the syllabus checklist. Be sure to attach a syllabus checklist to the front of the syllabus. You can find copies of the checklist in the Composition Office or online at http://louisville.edu/english/composition/checklist.html

          .

           

          2. Wait List and Over-enrollment Policy: Please do not tell students they can over-enroll in your courses (unless they are graduating seniors with a letter from their adviser). The wait list and over-enrollment policy for the program can be found at

          http://louisville.edu/english/composition/over-enrollment-policy.html

          .

           

          3. Early Morning Instructors: If you are teaching an 8:00 am course Linda will be distributing a list of other instructors who also teach at that time who you can contact if you have an emergency and need to miss class so that person can post a notice. The Composition Program office and the English Department office don't open until 8:00 and if you need to cancel a class word might not get to your students until 8:30 or so.

           

          4. Fall Grade Sheets: If you have not already done so, please give Linda a copy of your fall grade sheets as soon as possible. We are still missing some from fall courses. Thanks.

           

          5. Instructor Information Sheets: Information sheets will go out later this week. Please fill these out and return them to Linda as soon as possible. With more than fifty people teaching in the program it is a great help to us to have accurate information about your office hours, contact information, and so on. Thank you.

           

          6. Celebration of Student Writing: A reminder that we will hold the first Celebration of Student Writing on April

          8. There will be more details coming during the spring, but if you have questions or ideas about how to get your students involved, contact Matt Dowell (mldowe01@louisville.edu). More information about the event is available at: http://louisville.edu/english/composition/teaching-community.html

          .

           

          7. Good News: There is much good news among the people teaching in this program. You can

          find out about the accomplishments of your colleagues at CompPost

          (http://louisville.edu/english/composition/comppost.html

          .)

          Please send announcements of your good news to Tabetha Adkins (tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu).

           

          I hope the semester starts well for everyone. Please don't hesitate to stop by my office if there are problems, concerns, or if you just want to chat.

           

          Best,

           

          Bronwyn

           

          December 8, 2008

          Hello,

          This will be the final news email of the semester. I want to thank you all for another fine semester. Once again I am grateful for the hard work and dedication of everyone in the program. I wish you good luck with your grading and a calm and restful break.

          There are four items this week:

          1) Grades: Be sure to make two hard copies of your final grades. One to keep and one to turn in to Linda Baldwin.

          2) Portfolio Storage: Any final portfolios or papers that cannot be returned to students must be stored in the room off of 4F. If you have questions about the storage procedure, contact Linda.

          3) Photocopy Bills: Please play any outstanding photocopying bills by Dec. 19. If you have questions about your bill, contact Linda.

          4) Bonnie Library Books: If you have Bonnie Library Books checked out that you will not be using after this semester, please return them by Dec. 19.

          Have a great new year.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          December 1, 2008

          December?

          Wow.

          I hope everyone had a good break.

          There are four items this week:

          1) Final Grades: If you have questions about how to post your final
          grades you can find instructions in Appendix C of the Composition
          Program Handbook, which is online on the Composition Program site.

          Grades must be posted by 48 hours after your final exam time for your
          course. Remember to print out a copy of the final grade sheet for your
          records and to give a copy to Linda Baldwin. Also, if you have questions
          about the different ways of recording failing grades, please check the
          explanation on the bulletin board in the Comp Program office.

          2) Celebration of Student Writing Discussion: For those interested in
          the possibility of including the Celebration of Student Writing in their
          course planning for spring, there will be a meeting Wednesday, Dec 3 at
          noon in Humanities 300. Attending the meeting does not commit you to
          anything and not attending does not mean you cannot participate in the
          celebration next April. If you have questions contact Matt Dowell.

          3) Final Student Portfolios and Papers: Please make every attempt to
          return final student papers and portfolios to students. We must store
          any student papers that are not returned for one year, and storage space
          is limited. If you cannot return some of the papers, you must store them
          in the portfolio storage closet in 4F. Please do not leave final student
          papers or portfolios in your cubicle of on the floor once the semester
          is over.

          Below are the instructions for storing any portfolios students do not
          pick up. If you have questions about this process, contact Linda
          Baldwin.

          The portfolio storage closet is marked and is located at the back of HM
          LL 4F.


          We are required to retain student portfolios that have not been picked
          up for one year.

          For those who taught in the Fall 2007 semester:


          If you taught in the Fall 2007 semester, please locate your portfolio
          box(es) in the portfolio storage closet, and take it/them to the kitchen
          area of 4F/4H. Place the white paper portion of the portfolio into the
          recycling bin located in the kitchen area.

          Anything with the students* social security numbers, UL id numbers,
          etc. should be placed in the box marked *To Be Shredded.*

          Next place good, reusable empty ring binders, plastic folders, clips,
          etc. in the box marked *To be Salvaged/Reused.*

          Paper folders or damaged binders or folders, colored paper, magazine
          pages, etc. can be thrown away.

          Please keep your empty storage box(es), and store your Fall 2008
          portfolios in these boxes when you are ready to store them, updating the
          box label(s), and returning the boxed Fall 2008 portfolios to the
          portfolio storage closet. Blank box labels, tape, and markers are on
          the table in the kitchen area of 4F/4H.

          For those who did not teach in the Fall 2007 semester:

          Please go to the *kitchen area* of HM 4F/4H and select a box in
          which to store your portfolios. You may put each section in a separate
          box, or box all sections together, but make sure your label reflects
          which method you used. Fill in the label attached to the end of the
          box(es) and place them in the portfolio storage closet on the shelves
          marked *Fall 2008.*

          4) Award for Computers and Writing: This is an announcement from the
          online journal Kairos about an award for non-tenure-track faculty and
          graduate students:
          The Kairos Awards for Graduate Students and Adjuncts (formerly the
          Kairos/Lore Awards; co-sponsored by Bedford/St. Martin's Press), a
          series of three awards to recognize outstanding contributions in
          teaching, research, and service to the field of computers and writing by
          graduate students and non-tenure-track faculty. For criteria and
          submission guidelines, please visit
          http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/awards/gradadjunctnom.html.
          All award nominations and any questions should be sent to
          kawards@technorhetoric.net. The deadline for nominations for all
          awards is February 1, 2009.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          November 24, 2008

          Hello,

          I hope everyone has a safe and restful break.

          Just one item this week.

          1. Student Evaluation Packets. If your mailbox is in 4H you can find your student evaluation packets in 3 boxes on the table with the printer in 4H. Pencils are in a box under the table. Be sure you have the packet for your course or courses. If you have questions about the packets, can't find yours, or are unclear about the procedure, please contact Linda.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          November 17, 2008

          Hello,

          There are four items this week:

          1) Computer Classroom Requests for Spring 09: If you want to reserve time in a computer classroom for the spring semester please fill out the online form (http://louisville.edu/a-s/english/clt/cai-form.html.) today. If you fill out the form after today we cannot guarantee that we can accommodate your request.

          2) Celebration of Student Writing Workshop: Our initial Celebration of Student Writing will take place in early April (we are working out the details on the date and time right now). We will have a brown-bag discussion of how we can incorporate this event into spring courses on Wed. Dec. 3 from 12-1:30 in Hum 300. Attending this discussion does not obligate you to participate in the event, nor does missing it preclude you from participating. We just want to come up with ideas. If you have questions, please contact Matt Dowell.

          3) New Syllabus Checklist: If you didn't read the email I sent last week about the revised syllabus checklist for Composition Program courses, please do so. The revised documents are up on the Composition Program website.

          4) Photocopying Policy Feedback: Thank you to all who have given me a sense of how the photocopying limits are affecting your teaching. If anyone else has thoughts on this, please let me know in the next two days.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

           

          November 10, 2008

          Hello,

          There are four items this week:

          1) Computer Classroom Requests: Requests for Computer Classroom space for the spring semester are due by November 17. If you wish to be included on the CAI classroom schedule for the Spring Semester, please complete the form found athttp://louisville.edu/a-s/english/clt/cai-form.html. If you can schedule specific days, rather than every class session, that will help us get as many instructors into the classrooms as possible. Our top priority is to make these limited resources available to as many instructors as possible. If you are making a semester-long request, please include your "preferred day" in the "additional requests/instructions" entry blank to help facilitate scheduling. CAI classroom requests should be submitted by Monday, November 17. If you have questions, contact Matt Dowell.

          2) Course Descriptions: For the majority of you who have posted your course descriptions, thank you. For those of you who have not, please do so. We look foolish and unprofessional as a program when, after I urge the A&S Advising to use our course descriptions to help students make informed choices about their schedules, the advisers and students go to the descriptions and find one blank page after another. This is not an onerous or unreasonable task. If you haven't posted a course description do so immediately.

          3) Writing Textbook Roundtable: There will be roundtable discussion about writing textbooks featuring Joseph Harris of Duke University, Bruce Horner from UofL, and some other guy. The focus of the discussion will be how teaching and scholarship intersect in writing textbooks and how that shapes the projects. It is planned to help broaden our conversation about how we think about and use - and perhaps write - the textbooks that get used in composition courses. It will take place Wed, Nov. 12 from 2-3:30 in Humanities 300.

          4) Photocopying Policy Effects: I would like to get some sense of how the new photocopying policy is affecting our teaching. If you could send me a brief email summarizing how this is affecting your teaching (and if you can be specific if there have been particular problems) or if it has not been a hardship, I would like to send a report to the Technology Committee before the end of this semester. Thanks

          Have a good week.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          November 3, 2008

           

          Hi,

           

          First of all, I hope everyone votes tomorrow.

           

          Now, there are six items this week.

           

          1) Course Descriptions: Course descriptions for ALL Composition Program courses should be posted on the English Department website immediately, while they can still do some good during registration. You can find detailed instructions about how to post your course descriptions in Appendix D of the Composition Program handbook, which is also online at http://louisville.edu/english/composition/handbook.html

           

          The webpage to log in to the course description page is:

          https://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/dbadmin/

           

          2) Part-Time Lecturer Contracts: Linda will be processing contracts for part-time lecturers today. If you are a part-time lecturer who received a course assignment for spring 2009, please contact Linda about coming to HM 321 to sign your contract this afternoon or Thursday or Friday of this week.

           

          3) Pedagogy Workshop - Joseph Harris's Rewriting: Composition scholar and teacher Joseph Harris, of Duke University, will be visiting campus next week and participating in a roundtable discussion about textbooks, pedagogy, and composition scholarship. In anticipation of his visit there will be a workshop Wednesday to discuss his textbook, Rewriting. , November 5 from 11-12 in Humanities a.m. The workshop will be a rountable discussion of instructors sharing ideas, questions, and experiences about using or possibly using Harris's work. This is not an endorsement by the program of this book, but a chance to talk about how we use textbooks with this text as a focus. If you have questions contact Ryan Trauman.

           

          4) Brainstorming Session for Celebration of Student Writing: Also on Wednesday, November 5, Matt Dowell

          will lead a discussion on Wednesday at noon in HM300 to jump start a conversation regarding the Celebration of Student Writing planned for next fall. Your input will shape our planning, so please plan to attend. Contact

          Matt (mattldowell@gmail.com) if you have any questions or have opinions but cannot make the meeting.

           

          5) Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi, and Spring Book Orders: A number of instructors used the book-in-common from the Provost's office - Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis - in their courses this fall. I just want to remind people choosing books for spring courses that Satrapi is scheduled to speak at UofL on March 27. If you find this graphic novel an intriguing book to use for your courses, Satrapi's talk will offer a productive opportunity to connect students to the text. As always with book choices, participation is optional. If you have questions about the novel and how people have used it in their courses you may wish to talk to the instructors who are using it this fall.

           

          6) Book-in-Common Ideas for 2008-2009: This is the last week to send suggestions to the Provost's office for a first-year book in common for next year. Suggesting books does not commit you to participating in the program. Send your suggestions to Christy Metzger at christy.metzger@louisville.edu.

           

          Have a good week,

           

          Best,

           

          Bronwyn

          October 27, 2008

          Hello,

           

          There are five very important items this week.

           

          1) Spring Schedule: Letters with course assignments for Spring 2009 were distributed on Friday. If you have a question or concern about your schedule please see me as soon as possible, but understand that I will make changes to the schedule only in rare circumstances.

           

          2) Book Orders: Book order forms are due to Linda Baldwin by November 10.

           

          3) Course Descriptions: Course descriptions for ALL Composition Program courses should be posted on the English Department website as soon as possible. I would like to emphasize that this is not optional and I will be contacting people who do not post their descriptions. Registration will be taking place soon and it is important to students that they have the information about courses available in order to make an informed decision. You can find detailed instructions about how to post your course descriptions in Appendix D of the Composition Program handbook, which is also online at http://louisville.edu/english/composition/handbook.html

           

          The webpage to log in to the course description page is:

          https://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/dbadmin/

           

          If you have questions about posting your course descriptions see one of the ADCs or me.

           

          4) Part-Time Lecturer Contracts: Linda will be preparing the contracts this week and will contact part-time lecturers about signing them. The contracts must be sent to the College of Arts and Sciences by November 7.

           

          5) Computer Classroom Scheduling: If you wish to be included on the CAI classroom schedule for the Spring Semester, please complete the form found at http://louisville.edu/a-s/english/clt/cai-form.html. Our top priority is to make these limited resources available to as many instructors as possible. If you are making a semester-long request, please include your "preferred day" in the "additional requests/instructions" entry blank to help facilitate scheduling. CAI classroom requests should be submitted by Monday, November 17.

           

          October 20, 2008

          Hello,

          There are four items this week:

          1) Spring Scheduling: We are putting together the spring schedule this week. Look for your teaching assignment letters in your mailbox in 4H by the first of next week. Course descriptions and book orders will be due soon afterward.

          2) Celebration of Student Writing: Look for an email this week from Matt Dowell about a planning meeting for the Celebration of Student Writing we are going to hold in the spring. If you are interested in coming and brainstorming about how best to create such an event, come to the meeting on Wed. November 5 from 12-1 in Humanities 300.

          3) Election Day: Just a reminder that Election Day, November 4, is a University holiday with no classes. And a further, no doubt unnecessary, reminder to go and vote.

          4) Upcoming Pedagogy Workshop: Also look for an announcement soon of the next Writing Pedagogy Workshop.

          Have a good week,

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          October 15, 2008

          Hi,

          I hope everyone had a good break and that it was relaxing or productive depending on your needs.

          There are three four items this week:

          1. Watson Conference: The Watson Conference is this Thursday and Friday. Please be sure your classroom is not one of those needed for the conference.

          2. Printer Policy: Please remember that the printers in the basement -- in LL15, 4H, and 4F are only for printing materials for courses you are teaching. This is a long-standing policy. Please do not print materials for courses you are taking or other personal or professional work on these machines. Thanks.

          3. A Couple of Reminders: Please don't ask students to drop off papers for Composition Program courses in the Composition Program office or the main English Department office. With 2,600 students in the program you can understand why we have this policy. Also, please do not leave the Composition Program office phone number for business contacts you may have (banks, credit card companies, etc). Thank you.

          Sorry for all the admonishments on such a lovely autumn day, but I do appreciate your cooperation in all of these matters.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          October 6, 2008

          Hello,

          There are just two quick reminders this week.

          1) Watson Conference Classrooms: Remember that the Watson Conference (Oct 16-18) is taking some classrooms for conference presentations. The list of sections and classrooms is posted in the Composition Program Office. If you teach any of those three days please check the list.

          2) Course Withdrawal Deadline: The last day for students to withdraw from a course is October 16. Before that time they should have some graded work returned to them or some sense of their grade so they can make decisions about whether to stay in your class. Please remind your students of this deadline.

          A quiet week....too quiet......

          Bronwyn

           

          September 29, 2008

          Hello,

          There are four items this week:

          1) Scheduling Preference Sheets for Spring 2009: Scheduling Preference Sheets are due this Friday, October 3. If you have questions about the preference sheets, please let me or one of the Assistant Directors know.

          2) Course Withdrawal Deadline: The last day for students to withdraw from a course is October 16. Before that time they should have some graded work returned to them or some sense of their grade so they can make decisions about whether to stay in your class. Please remind your students of this deadline.

          3) Conference Presentations: If you are going to be presenting at the Watson Conference, 4Cs, MLA, or any other conference please send the information to Tabetha Adkins (tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu) so she can put it up on ComPost http://louisville.edu/english/composition/comppost.html

          4) Great Workshop: We had a great conversation last Wednesday about using politics and the presidential elections in your courses. Thanks so much to Eric Leake and Kennie Rose for great materials (which will be posted on ComPost and Efiles soon), to Ryan Trauman for organizing the workshop, and to the 25 people who came and took part. News of the next workshop will be coming soon.


          Best,
          Bronwyn

          September 22, 2008

          Hello,

          I hope everyone has power back (and if not gets it soon). I so much appreciate the professional and cooperative attitude of everyone during what was not an easy time last week.

          There are three items this week:

          1) Teaching Writing Workshop: The first writing pedagogy workshop of the semester will focus on "Politics in the Classroom: Teaching the 2008 Election." Eric Leake and Kennie Rose will lead the discussion. The workshop will take place Wed. Sept. 24 from 12-1 in Humanities 300. I've heard from a number of people with good ideas on this subject already so I think it will be a great conversation. If you have any questions, please contact Ryan Trauman.

          2) Scheduling Preference Sheets for Spring 2009: Scheduling Preference Sheets will be distributed in your mailboxes in 4H this week. Please fill out the sheets and return them to Linda Baldwin by Friday, October 3. If you have questions about the preference sheets, please let me or one of the Assistant Directors know. Please keep in mind two realities about spring scheduling. First, we have about 25-30 percent fewer sections to offer in the spring. I do the best I can to get everyone as many sections as possible, but the reality of the numbers is that I can't give everyone all the sections requested. Second, the schedule the College gives us has very very few T-Th sections. Please try to be as flexible as you can when filling out your preference sheet.

          3. Teaching Observations: Just a reminder that those of you in your first, second, or fourth years of teaching in the program will have your teaching observed this semester. You should be contacted by the faculty person who will observe you within the next few weeks. If you have questions about the policy you can find a copy of it at: http://louisville.edu/english/composition/professional-development-observations.html. If you have any concerns about your observations, let me know.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          September 15, 2008

          Hello,

          I hope everyone has come through the winds safely and is muddling through the blackout as well as possible.

          There are three items this week:

          1) ComPost: ComPost, the Composition Program's electronic newsletter is up, streamlined, revived, new and improved, and, quite frankly, indispensable. You can find program news, see what new books are in the Bonnie Library, read about the cool things your colleagues are up to, and share insights and ideas about teaching. We are looking for anecdotes, thoughts, quotes, or other ideas for the Teaching Community section. Also, if you have a publication coming out, or have been accepted to present at a conference (hello Watson and 4Cs people), or have other good news, please share that as well. Send any information for ComPost to Tabetha Adkins (tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu). We have
          an amazing community of teachers and scholars in the Comp Program and this is one place to keep in touch. You can find ComPost at: http://louisville.edu/english/composition/comppost.html

          2) Teaching Writing Workshop: The first writing pedagogy workshop of the semester will focus on "Politics in the Classroom: Teaching the 2008 Election." Eric Leake and Kennie Rose will lead the discussion. The workshop will take place Wed. Sept. 24 from 12-1 in Humanities 300. This is a great opportunity to pick up new ideas for your classes, share ideas and assignments you've come up with, and just generally join in the conversation about teaching writing. We had great workshops and conversations last year and I look forward to having them again. If you have any questions, please contact Ryan Trauman.

          3) Bonnie Library Books: If you have Bonnie Library books checked out that you are no longer using, please return them to Linda in HM 321 as soon as possible. If you have books that have been checked out longer than 30 days, but you still need them, please come by Linda*s office and renew them for another 30 days. Linda will still be sending out overdue reminders, but if people respond to this request, we can save some paper and copying.

          Have a good and calm week.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

          September 8, 2008

           

          There are four items this week:

           

          1). Teaching Writing Workshop: The first writing pedagogy workshop of the semester will focus on "Politics in the Classroom: Teaching the 2008 Election." Eric Leake and Kennie Rose will lead the discussion. The workshop will take place Wed. Sept. 24 from 12-1 in Humanities 300. This is a great opportunity to pick up new ideas for your classes, share ideas and assignments you've come up with, and just generally join in the conversation about teaching writing. We had great workshops and conversations last year and I look forward to having them again. If you have any questions, please contact Ryan Trauman.

           

          2) Watson Conference Classrooms: Just a reminder that the Watson Conference will be taking over classrooms in the Humanities building on October 16 and 17. Please check now to see if your course sections will be affected by the conference. There is a list of the classrooms on the bulletin board above the copier in the Composition Program office.

           

          3) Conference Room New Flooring Update: As you no doubt know by now the work on the floors in the rooms off of 4H is continuing apace and should be done soon and the furniture and computers moved back. Thank you again for your patience with this process.

           

          4) State of the University class closings: And another reminder that the Provost's Office has commanded that no classes meet Tuesday, Sept. 9 from 3-4:30 pm during the president's State of the University address so that students and staff who are so inclined may attend.

           

          September 2, 2008

          Hi,

          I hope everyone had a good weekend and found ways to stay cool.

          There are six items this week.

          1) Information Sheets: The Composition Program information sheets that were placed in your mailboxes are due back to Linda Baldwin by Friday, September 5.

          2) Course Syllabi: First, in the interest of conserving photocopies, if you need to make amendments to your syllabus, consider placing them on Blackboard and notifying your students. Also, if you have not turned in a copy of your syllabus to Linda, with the syllabus checklist attached, please do so.

          3) Official Roster: Now that registration is officially over and the electronic waitlist is no longer in effect, check your official roster on ULink and make sure it corresponds with the people in your course (or courses).

          4) Part-Time Lecturer Contracts: Part-Time Lecturers should have received a gold final copy of your contract either from Linda or in your mailbox last week. If you have not received yours please contact Linda.

          5) Textbooks for Romania: We have been clearing out outdated editions of textbooks from the library in 4H and Anca Iancu is going to send those books to Romania where they can be put to good use. The cost of shipping so many books is, of course, not cheap and so we are taking a voluntary collection to help Anca defray her shipping costs. Small donations can accumulate quickly into a reasonable amount so if you have some spare change you would like to contribute there is a glass in the Comp Office near the photocopier for this purpose.

          6) Digital Media Suite: You may have seen on UofL Today that the library now has a Digital Media Suite available for people who want their students to work on multimodal projects. It is located in Ekstrom Library (Room 114) and has Mac workstations, Apple and Adobe production & premium design packages as well as tutors to provide training and assistance. For more information visit http://www.louisville.edu/digitalmediasuite or call Rae Helton, Learning Commons coordinator, at 852-7589.

          Hope everyone has a great week.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          August 25, 2008:

          It was a great to see everyone Friday and to catch up on everyone's news. I want to thank Linda Baldwin for all her work in getting the workshop day organized and to the workshop presenters for some excellent ideas to try out in the classroom. Once again, the conversations I heard about teaching reminded me of how lucky we are to have such strong and dedicated instructors in this program. I'm looking forward to a great semester.

          There are a bunch of items to start the year (hey, it's the first week of class....). I also want to remind everyone that these emails and other program news and announcements are posted on CompPost

          (http://louisville.edu/english/composition/comppost.html.)

          1. Photocopying and Printing Policies: If you have any questions about the new policies on photocopying or printing please check with Linda or me. Again, we are still getting these worked out so be patient with us. I will keep you informed on the policies as I hear about them from the Technology Committee. Again, however, the bottom line is reduce your photocopying or printing whenever possible. If you want to scan documents as PDF files and post them on Blackboard, but are unsure how to do so, you can make an appointment with one of the ADCs to get some help. If you come up with other ideas for how we can limit our photocopying costs please let me know and I will forward them to the Tech Committee.

          2. Syllabus Copies: Please turn in a copy of your syllabus to Linda by Friday of this week. Be sure to attach a syllabus checklist to the back of the syllabus. You can find copies of the checklist in the Composition Office or online on the Composition Program website. http://louisville.edu/english/composition/checklist.html

          3. Office Hours: Please post your office hours on your carrel so that students dropping by or colleagues looking for you can find them. You must have two hours for each section you teach.

          4. Information Sheets: Information sheets for the Composition Program will be put in your mailboxes this week (on pink paper no less). Please fill them out and return them to Linda as soon as you can. The information on office hours and contact information is vital for us to have in the office to help students and the other information is necessary for accreditation purposes.

          5. Classroom Lock Codes: Many of the classrooms in Humanities and Davidson now have keypad locks on them. Punching in the numbers 1-7 or 1-6 in sequence or the number "1" seven times should do it. Great security, huh? If you can't get into a classroom you can contact Marcia Reed at 852-6180 or you can call public safety.

          6. Good News: There is much good news among the people teaching in this program. From publications to theatre performances to awards to writing historical markers, you can find out about the accomplishments of your colleagues at CompPost (http://louisville.edu/english/composition/comppost.html.) If there are ways we can make ComPost more useful please pass those ideas along. Please send announcements of your good news to either me or to Tabetha Adkins (Tabetha.Adkins@louisville.edu).

          7. Check Course Roster: Be sure to check your official online course roster through ULink and make certain the students in your class are the ones on your roster. If you have a student who is on the roster but never attended class (or only showed up one day) send the name and ID number of the student to Linda Baldwin (linda.baldwin@louisville.edu) She will forward the names to the Registrar's Office who will attempt to contact the students and see if they want to drop. If the students drop it will allow students on your waitlist to get into your class.

          8. Overenrollment Policy: Please do not tell students they can over-enroll in your courses (unless they are graduating seniors with a letter from their adviser). The over-enrollment policy for the program can be found at http://louisville.edu/english/composition/over-enrollment-policy.html

          9. Efiles: Efiles is back up and working so please use it to help find new ideas for teaching. I planned on having a teaching idea posted there today, but am having some trouble uploading the documents. But, once I get that sorted I will post some reading response guidelines I use for 101. And I urge you to upload your own syllabi and assignments to share the wealth of knowledge in the program. You can find Efiles at http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/index.cfm

          I hope the first week goes well for everyone. I look forward to working with you all this year.

          Best,

          Bronwyn

           

          April 28, 2008

          This is the last Comp News of the Semester. Enclosed you will find 4
          items and one teaching tip that may get you re-thinking how you
          structure future classes.

          1. CONGRATULATIONS TO SHANNON DEHN:
          Shannon has received the 2008 part-time lecturer teaching award
          sponsored by Gray's Bookstore. This award honors and recognizes the many
          fine Part-Time Lecturers who teach in and support the Composition
          Program. Formal acknowledgement of this award will be made at the Fall
          Orientation, August 22.

          2. COMPUTER CLASSROOM REQUESTS DUE MAY 9:
          If you wish to hold your Fall 2008 class in a computer classroom, submit
          your request by May 9. Request should be submitted by completing the
          simple form at:
          http://louisville.edu/a-s/english/clt/cai-form.html

          3. TURN IN PAPER COPIES OF YOUR GRADES:
          Paper copies of your grade roster(s) should be given to Linda ASAP after
          you record your grades. It is very important that we have these copies
          both as a back-up in case of any grade disputes and for our internal
          reporting.

          4. SUBMIT TO E-FILES:
          The E-files is becoming an increasingly useful pedagogical resource.
          Please contribute to this resource by uploading a sample syllabus,
          assignment, handout, or other course materials that you found useful in
          your classes. You can submit materials by going to:
          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_main.cfm
          Click on "Submit an Assignment"
          You will be prompted to log on. Use your regular UofL ID and password.
          Assignments can be submitted anonymously.

          5. TEACHING TIP: INSTRUCTOR-LIBRARIAN COLLABORATIONS
          This final teaching tip is from Tamara Yohannes, winner of a 2008
          Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award. Tamara has some great ideas for
          re-thinking the role of research in a classroom that is applicable to
          teaching 101 and 102 as well as many literature classes. Here is her tip:

          Even in the age when students seem most comfortable with technology and
          have a wonderful confidence that they can find any information they need
          on the internet, as instructors of COLLEGE writing we may feel that
          using library resources, and even (perish the thought) hard copies of
          those sources, would benefit our students' research efforts.

          With that assumption in mind, and in collaboration with Anna Marie
          Johnson in Ekstrom Library, I redesigned both my English 101 and 102
          courses to use library research as the strategy around which every
          activity in those courses revolved. We decided to use a themed course
          on a subject which we felt would not be inherently interesting to the
          students but in which we felt students COULD find research subjects of
          interest.

          Three elements were essential to this course redesign – COLLABORATION
          between librarian and instructor, LIBRARY-CENTERED ACTIVITIES in every
          aspect of the course, and A THEME from which students could glean
          meaningful research projects. Anna Marie and I published our findings on
          the experiment in American Exchange Quarterly -- and the full article
          has been posted on E-Files. But here are our conclusions:

          We take from the two-semester experiment in faculty/librarian
          collaboration several elements that can be generalized to other classes.
          First, the collaboration itself is immensely helpful. Even as the
          instructor retains primary instructional responsibility for the class,
          the collaborative dynamic makes possible a richer, more feasible, more
          engaging project for the students.

          In addition, keeping every activity instrumental to the research project
          and thus using no generalized instruction aids in transference of skills
          from one venue to the next. Because they are working in collaboration,
          the librarian and teaching faculty are completely aware
          of the goals of the class and are confident that the students can and
          will find the materials they need; the result is that technical
          instruction in using the library resources can remain at a minimum and
          can be focused on the students* actual projects.

          Using a themed course allows a variety of research possibilities so that
          students can choose something of interest to research and have plenty of
          time to acclimate to the subject. At the same time, in order for
          students to maximize their experiences using the library resources, it
          is important to include one paper that gives students an open-ended
          research experience. Allowing students to explore freely what the
          library has to offer infuses an element of excitement into the research
          writing process and engages students in ways that other models just do
          not. Following-up on the open-ended paper with an argument paper works
          well because it requires students to write persuasively by selecting
          materials they already have at hand to support their point. Separating
          the process of finding materials in the library from the very different
          process of writing persuasively about a subject the student already
          knows something about allows students to use the information they have
          found in the libraries to their own advantage.

          In assessing our experience with the two semesters* classes, both the
          librarian and teaching faculty realized that repeating the same theme
          the next semester does not work well. The librarians and the teacher
          need to remain truly part of the research community, which is possible
          only when they do not already "know" what the students need to find on
          their topics. If research is a "voyage of discovery," the student needs
          to be the captain of the voyage and that can only happen when the
          assisting professionals are on the boat as crew members.

           

          -Joanna

           

          April 21, 2008

          It's a busy week. There are eight items in this week's composition
          news......

          1. TURN IN PAPER COPIES OF YOUR GRADES:
          Paper copies of your grade roster(s) should be given to Linda ASAP after
          you record your grades. It is very important that we have these copies
          both as a back-up in case of any grade disputes and for our internal
          reporting.


          2. FOLLOW NEW REQUIREMENTS FOR REPORTING *F* GRADES:
          To meet federal requirements for aid management instructors will now be
          asked to select ****EF** (earned failure--student completed the course
          but did not pass), ****UF* *(unearned failure--student began the course
          but stopped attending; this entry will also request the date of last
          participation) or ****NP**(never participated--the student has no
          documented record of participation in the class). Instructors are not
          expected to take extraordinary efforts to document participation but
          should use the records they customarily use in evaluating course work,
          such as a roll call response, participation in a group activity, or a
          test grade. The transcript and online grade reports will show only the
          grade of *F,* regardless of the code entered by the instructor. The
          regulation
          requirements and the significance and consequences of the different
          codes are detailed in a document at the following web address:

          https://docushare.louisville.edu/dsweb/Get/Document-6774/Grading_business_process_changes_08S-final.doc


          3. FOLLOW GUIDELINES FOR GIVING INCOMPLETES:
          For grades of “I” given for spring 08, instructors must submit grades to
          Registrar’s Office to remove incomplete grades by December 17, 2008.
          Incompletes NOT removed by this date will be lapsed to “F”s. Refer to
          on-line Undergraduate Catalog for details about giving a grade of
          Incomplete.

          4. STORE YOUR PORTFOLIOS:
          Any portfolios you do not return to your students must be stored for one
          year in the storage room at the back of 4F. There are detailed
          instructions on how to prepare your portfolios on the door of the
          storage room and a portfolio storage work area with necessary supplies
          of labels and tape in the kitchen behind 4H. Please follow these
          directions so that Linda can easily access student portfolios when she
          needs to. If you have questions, please contact Linda. Also, please do
          not store portfolios without first giving students a chance to pick up
          their portfolio from you in person.

          5. PAY YOUR COPY BILL AND RETURN BONNIE BOOKS
          If you owe for personal copies, please see Linda about paying these
          before you leave for the summer. Also, please check bookshelves/desks at
          home and return any Bonnie Books that you are not using. If you have
          Bonnie Books checked out for more than 4 weeks, please see Linda about
          renewing them if you still need them.

          6. (PTL'S ONLY) SIGN CONTRACTS AND MAKE SURE LINDA HAS C.V. ON FILE
          PTL contracts for Fall 08 have been prepared and will be put in your
          mailboxes later today.
          Please sign your contract, date it, and return it to Linda before you
          leave campus for the summer.
          If you will be teaching as a PTL for the first time this summer or fall,
          Linda will need your up-to-date cv/resume. You may send one to her
          attached to an e-mail or drop one by her office.

          7. MARK AUGUST 22, 9:00-3:00 ON CALENDAR FOR FALL ORIENTATION
          All Composition instructors must attend the Fall 2008 orientation
          scheduled on Friday August 22, 2007 9:00-3:00. A continental breakfast
          will be available starting at 8:30 a.m. The breakfast is provided by
          Gray’s Bookstore,

          8. (RESEARCHERS ONLY): ATTEND THE C'S ABSTRACT WORKSHOP ON WED
          We will be holding an Abstracts workshop on Wed, April 23, 12:00 in HM
          300 for those interested in submitting a proposal to the 2009 College
          Composition and Communication Conference (CCCC). LUNCH PROVIDED. You can
          drop in without RSVPing, but if you'd like a lunch, contact Ryan Trauman
          by noon April 22 at ryantrauman@gmail.com <mailto:ryantrauman@gmail.com>.

          -Joanna

           

          April 14, 2008

          This week's composition news has 5 items and one teaching tip.

           

          1. BOOK IN COMMON MEETING: This Friday, April 18, 11:30-1:00 in HM 300

          we will be meeting to brainstorm together about ways to incorporate

          Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, next year's Book in Common, in composition

          classes. We will brainstorm assignment ideas and pedagogical strategies.

          FREE LUNCH. A light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Tabetha

          Adkins by Thursday morning if you are interested in attending,

          Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu <mailto:Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu> You

          can check out a copy of Persepolis from Linda Baldwin in HM 321 to review.

           

          2. CCCC Abstracts workshop—CORRECT DATE: Wed, April 23, 12:00 in HM 300

          For those interested in submitting a proposal to the 2009 College

          Composition and Communication Conference (CCCC), we will be holding an

          Abstracts Workshop in which interested parties break into small groups

          and read and comment on submissions. LUNCH PROVIDED. You can drop in

          without RSVPing, but if you'd like a lunch, contact Ryan Trauman by noon

          April 22 at ryantrauman@gmail.com <mailto:ryantrauman@gmail.com>.

           

          3. COURSE EVALUATIONS: Evaluation packets and pencils are in 4H on the

          table between 4I and 4J. An instruction sheet is on the front of each

          evaluation packet. Please not that evaluations are to be done in the

          CLASSROOM setting when students can be assured of full anonymity and the

          instructor does not any contact with the evaluations before they are

          turned in.

           

          4. FALL COURSE ASSIGNMENTS: Fall 2008 course assignment letters and book

          orders have been placed in mailboxes here on campus or (for those not on

          campus this semester) have been mailed to the home address that was

          available on PeopleSoft as of last week. Please note that book orders

          for Fall 2008 are due in HM 321 on or before April 25. Please let Linda

          know if you need an extension on this date. If you do not intended to

          use a textbook, please turn in your book order marked "no text required."

           

          5. RETURNING PORTFOLIOS: Any portfolios you do not return to your

          students must be stored for one year in the storage room at the back of

          4F. However, please do not store portfolios without first giving

          students a chance to pick up their portfolio from you in person.

           

          6. TEACHING TIP: The Perils and Promise of Praise

          A recent article in Education Leadership summarizes research that

          indicates that praising students for their natural intelligence can have

          long-term negative effects. Students who are used to being praised for

          their intelligence tend to see struggle as evidence that they are not

          smart. These students tend to be risk adverse, choosing easy tasks that

          ensure error-free performance. By contrast, students accustomed to being

          praised for their effort tend to have higher confidence in their

          abilities and see challenges as opportunities to learn. Moreover,

          students praised for intelligence were more likely to lie about their

          test scores (and one might infer might be more likely to plagiarize)

          than those praised for effort.

           

          The author (Carol Dweck) writes:

          "Our research shows that educators cannot hand students confidence on a

          silver platter by praising their intelligence. Instead, we can help them

          gain the tools they need to maintain their confidence in learning by

          keeping them focused on the process of achievement."

           

          So, the moral is, as you work on providing students with those final

          assessments: praise them for process and effort and perseverance, but

          not intelligence. Try to instill a growth mind-set in your students

          where confidence is gained by focusing on the PROCESS OF ACHEIVEMENT.

           

          To read more, go to:

          http://wellesleyhigh.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/Perils-and-Promise-of-Praise.pdf

           

          -Joanna

           

          April 8, 2008

           

          There are 7 items on this week's composition news.

           

          1. FALL COURSES: Letters detailing your Fall course assignments will go

          out by the end of this week. Linda Baldwin should be able to tell you

          informally what your courses are by Tuesday afternoon so you can have

          this information for the Book fair on Wed. Everyone who turned in a

          course preference sheet received at least one course.

           

          2. COURSE EVALUATIONS: Later this week, Linda will put evaluation

          packets in Room 4H (on the table outside LL04I and LL04J). Please check

          early and let Linda know if something is missing from your evaluation

          packets or if you do not have a packet(s). There will also be a box of

          pencils on the table; whenever possible, please return your pencils to

          the box after use. Evaluations are to be done in the CLASSROOM setting

          when students can be assured of full anonymity and the instructor does

          not any contact with the evaluations before they are turned in.

          Evaluations done during individual conferences or in another situation

          outside of the classroom are NOT acceptable.

           

          3. PEDAGOGY WORKSHOP on Style: Tues, April 8 at 2:00 in HM 300.

          Mary Rotella will be leading a pedagogy workshop on teaching style in

          composition courses *Tuesday at 2:00*. We’ll have snacks and Mary will

          have some great tips for teaching style and local revision. Everyone is

          invited. Please RSVP to Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu

          <mailto:Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu> so that the appropriate amount of

          snacks can be purchased.

           

          4. BOOK FAIR: Wed, April 9, 10-2 in HM 300.

          A Multi-vendor book fair will be held on Wed., April 9 from 10-2 in HM

          300. FREE LUNCH! This is a time to look at books for your courses for

          next semester. GTAs who will be teaching composition for the first time

          should especially try to stop by and introduce themselves to Joanna Wolfe.

           

          5. BOOK IN COMMON MEETING: Friday, April 18, 11:30-1:00 in HM 300.

          Next year's book in common is Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, a fun,

          short graphic novel that should work well in 101 and 102 classes. This

          book in common meeting is intended to help instructors brainstorm and

          collaborate on ways they might include Persepolis in their composition

          classes. If you are interested in reading and possibly assigning

          Persepolis, you can check out a copy from Linda (the Bonnie library has

          4 copies). Joanna also has FREE COPIES for anyone who is pretty sure

          they want to assign it. Just pop your head in my office.

           

          6. CCCC Abstracts workshop: Wed, April 24, 12:00 in HM 300

          For those interested in submitting a proposal to the 2009 College

          Composition and Communication Conference (CCCC), we will be holding an

          Abstracts Workshop in which interested parties break into small groups

          and read and comment on submissions. LUNCH PROVIDED. You can drop in

          without RSVPing, but if you'd like a lunch, contact Ryan Trauman at

          ryantrauman@gmail.com <mailto:ryantrauman@gmail.com>.

           

          7. Fall 2007 Incompletes: The deadline for instructors to submit grades

          for Incompletes given in Fall 2007 is Tuesday, April 29. Incompletes NOT

          removed by this data will automatically lapse to an F. Finishing an

          Incomplete is the student's responsibility.

           

          -Joanna

           

          March 31, 2008

           

          This week's composition news has four announcements and one teaching tip.

           

          1. Teaching Preference Sheets Due!!!!: Teaching Preference sheets for

          Fall 08 teaching are due to Linda on or before Thursday.

           

          2. Persepolis Book in Common: You may check out a copy of next year's

          book in common, Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, from the Bonnie Library.

          Even if you decide not to adopt it for your writing class next year, you

          will still have fun reading it. We will have an informal meeting on

          Friday April 18, 11:30-1:00 to discuss the book and brainstorm ideas for

          how it could be used in composition classes. There is also a wiki for

          sharing resources, thoughts and ideas related to teaching Persepolis at

          UofL: http://thinkingaboutpersepolis.pbwiki.com/

           

          3. Security: Remind yourself and remind students that thefts become

          increasingly common at the end of the semester. As the bookstore begins

          offering buy-backs textbook thefts increasingly become a problem. Thefts

          of laptops are also growing. Remember to keep your belongings secure.

           

          4. Technology Tip—Graphics and thumb drives: If you have trouble

          retrieving image files from your thumb drive, try saving your files to a

          hard drive and working from the hard drive copy. Thumb drives can be

          slow and cause this picture-visibility problem. Thanks to Geoff Cross

          for this tip.

           

          5. Teaching Tip: Portfolio Reading suggestions

          It is not too early to think about strategies for reading and evaluating

          final writing portfolios. It is a good idea to share as much of your

          assessment process and criteria with students as possible in advance.

          Steve Smith has a portfolio rubric available on EFiles that is tied to

          the learning outcomes statement for English 101:

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm (keyword:

          portfolio)

           

          Steve also has a list of procedures for reading portfolios:

           

          _HOW I READ AND ASSESS PORTFOLIOS_

          _ _

          1) CHECK TO SEE ALL REQUIRED COMPONENTS ARE THERE AND LOOK AT THE

          QUALITY OF OVERALL PRESENTATION, E.G. TITLES, PAGE NUMBERS, TABLE OF

          CONTENTS, CLEAR LABELS FOR ALL COMPONENTS.

           

          2) READ THE REFLECTIVE COVER LETTER FOR ENGAGEMENT WITH THE GOALS

          OF THE COURSE.

           

          3) READ THE FOUR FINAL DRAFTS HOLISTICALLY, I.E. AS A BODY OF WORK.

           

          4) LOOK TO SEE WHETHER EACH GOAL WAS MET, EXCEEDED, OR NOT MET.

           

          5) PAY ATTENTION TO DEGREE OF REVISION IN EVIDENCE BETWEEN DRAFTS.

           

          6) LOOK BACK AT EARLIER DRAFTS IF QUESTIONS ARISE.

           

          7) CHECK FOR PLAGIARISM, IF NECESSARY.

           

          8) WRITE SUMMATIVE RESPONSE VIA RUBRIC.

           

          9) AGONIZE IF NECESSARY. REREAD IF NECESSARY.

           

          10) ASSIGN GRADE FOR PORTFOLIO BASED ON HOLISTIC EVALUATION OF THE

          DEGREE TO WHICH THE OUTCOMES WERE MET OR NOT.

           

          -Joanna

           

          March 25, 2008

           

          This week's Composition News has five items and one teaching tip:

           

          1. Thurs, April 3—Teaching Preference Sheets Due!!!!: Teaching

          Preference sheets for Fall 08 teaching are due to Linda on or before

          Thursday, April 3. The Teaching Preference sheet is photocopied on blue

          paper. We will be doing staffing for Fall on April 7 and hope to have

          Fall class assignments out to everyone by Tues, April 8. (I am checking

          on a few things, but hope to have the Summer staffing schedule finalized

          by the end of this week).

           

          2. Tues, April 8—Pedagogy workshop on STYLE: Mary Rotella will be

          leading a pedagogy workshop on teaching style in composition courses at

          2:00 on Tuesday, March 4 in HUM 300. We’ll have snacks and Mary will

          have some great tips for teaching style and local revision. Everyone is

          invited. Please RSVP to Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu

          <mailto:Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu> so that the appropriate amount of

          snacks can be purchased.

           

          3. Wed, April 9—Book fair, 10-2: A Multi-vendor book fair will be held

          on Wed., April 9 from 10-2 in HM 300. FREE LUNCH! Some of the vendors

          planning to attend include Bedford, Freeman & Worth (Bedford-St.

          Martin's), Cengage Learning (formerly Thompson), McGraw-Hill/Irwin, and

          W.W. Norton. Free lunch will be provided.

           

          4. Class Size increase for 303, 306, 309, 310: Because of the current

          budget situation, the department has voted to increase class size for

          all upper-level writing classes to 22. (Class sizes for 101 and 102

          remain the same at 22 and 26 respectively). This change goes into effect

          with this summer.

           

          5. Next Year's Book in Common—Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi. Persepolis

          is a fun, short graphic novel that has been chosen for the Book in

          Common initiative for 2008-09. The book in common is a relatively new

          first-year initiative by the university that seeks to help first-year

          students transition into the university by connecting students through a

          common reading and by sponsoring events, conversations, and other

          intellectual endeavors that can occur outside the traditional classroom

          setting. We are encouraging instructors to assign and find ways to use

          Persepolis in their 101 and 102 classes. This book would work

          particularly well in classes that assign multimodal projects or spend

          substantial class time discussing genre. The book also lends itself to

          discussions on gender, class, religion, war, and/or the Middle East.

           

          If you are interested in reading and possibly assigning Persepolis, you

          can check out a copy from Linda (the Bonnie library has 4 copies).

          Joanna also has FREE COPIES for anyone who is pretty sure they want to

          assign it. Just pop your head in my office. You are also invited to the

          Book in Common Kickoff, March 27, 2-4PM in Room W210 in Ekstrom library.

          REFRESHMENTS and some FREE BOOKS will be provided.

           

          I will also be hosting a meeting of interested instructors the week of

          April 14 to brainstorm ways to incorporate the book in composition

          classes. I plan to put some sample assignments and related readings up

          on Efiles by the end of the semester.

           

          6. Teaching Tip: Corbett's Numerical Style Analysis

          One of our primary jobs as writing instructors is to help students

          distance themselves from their writing and be able to view their prose

          the same way other readers might perceive it. I have found Corbett's

          numerical style analyses a productive way to achieve this distancing

          effect and simultaneously think about style more critically.

           

          Corbett's style analysis method asks students to complete a worksheet in

          which they COUNT things in their writing and compare their tallies and

          averages to those in a sample of professional writing that they would

          like to emulate. Corbett developed four different charts that include

          things like sentence and paragraph length; sentence types (simple,

          compound, complex) for slightly more advanced writers; sentence openers

          and diction for very advanced writers. After students complete the

          chart, Corbett asks them to write an informal essay based on what they

          learned.

           

          I've never used Corbett's assignment exactly as he describes it (I think

          the advanced charts are too, too much), but I've used a million

          variations on the basic method. Sometimes, I just have students go

          through papers they are getting ready to turn in and underline all the

          "to be" verbs on pages 2-3 of a paper. Then they calculate an average,

          compare it to the class average (usually around .7), and work with a

          partner to see if any sentences using multiple "to be" verbs could be

          revised to be more concise and vivid. (The theory behind this is that

          overuse of "to be" verbs is often a sign of passive and/or wordy and

          imprecise writing). I allow students to "keep" any edits that they make

          on their papers. Sometimes, this exercise results in students producing

          some weird sentences just to get rid of the "to be" verbs—and we discuss

          those occasions—but more often, it jolts certain students into thinking

          more critically about their style.

           

          Similarly, I have used more elaborate versions and asked students to

          write a short paragraph on what they have learned or sometimes even an

          entire 1-2 page informal essay. A few students object to tallying the

          numbers, but many more (including several of those who have been

          unmotivated for most of the semester) tell me the exercise is really

          eye-opening and has motivated them to try to improve their writing style

          in particular ways.

           

          -Joanna

           

           

          March 3, 2008

           

          There are five announcements and one teaching tip in this week's

          composition news

           

          1. Pedagogy workshop rescheduled: The Pedagogy workshop led by Mary

          Rotella originally scheduled for this Tuesday has been rescheduled to

          Tuesday 4/8 at 2:30. Please contact Tabetha Adkins

          Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu <mailto:Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu> to

          RSVP.

           

           

          2. Upcoming deadlines:

          2a. Part-time Lecturer teaching award nominations due today: To

          nominate a part-time lecturer for this award send a brief letter of

          nomination to Joanna Wolfe by tomorrow morning. Self nominations are

          accepted.

           

          2b. Applications for Assistant Director of Composition and Assistant

          Director of Business Writing are due March 15. These positions are

          available to doctoral GTAs. For more information, contact Joanna.

           

          3. Emergency Drill Tuesday: The severe weather we had just a couple of

          weeks ago demonstrated the need for everyone on campus to know where to

          go in the event of an emergency. In an attempt to educate faculty and

          students of safety procedures the entire campus will be participating in

          a tornado drill next Tuesday, March 4 at 10:07 am. For detailed

          instructions please follow this link

          http://louisville.edu/dehs/emergency/tornado.html .

           

          4. Part-time Faculty -- It's election time for the Faculty Senate

          again. If you're teaching as a part-time lecturer and usually teach 2

          out of the 3 semesters, please consider running for election to the

          Faculty Senate. We actually have two open seats and could use another

          person from English!!!!! As a part-time faculty senator, you would have

          the chance to influence policy concerning part-time faculty and to be on

          the inside concerning all types of policy and budgetary matters. And,

          it's paid service for the university!! $500 a semester....

           

          To run, all you need to do is e-mail a short bio (less than 100 words)

          to Bev Edwards in Communications -- edwards100@yahoo.com

          <mailto:edwards100@yahoo.com> -- but if you have any questions, see

          Tamara Yohannes or Joanne Webb.

           

          5. EGO Book Sale: The English Graduate Organization is organizing its

          annual Book Sale event on 18-20 March, Tuesday-Thursday the week after

          spring break. Please mark your schedule (any time between 9 and 3one of

          these days) to browse and buy some useful books in the lobby of Bingham.

          EGO volunteers are also dropping brown bags in your offices to collect

          more books this week.

           

          6. Teaching Tip: Point-Predict (or Interpretative reading) Peer review

          and conferencing strategy

          One of the goals of writing courses should be to teach writers to see

          their writing from a reader's point of view. The point-predict is a

          simple peer review strategy first publicized by Barbara Sitko that

          impresses upon writers that their writing creates certain expectations

          in readers that they need to fulfill.

           

          In a point-predict peer review, writers have peers read their paper

          *aloud*, pausing every few sentences to summarize what the main point is

          and then predict what will come next. When the reader's prediction does

          not match what actually follows, the writer and reader need to discuss

          why the reader had this expectation and what could be done to revise the

          paper. The point-predict strategy also works well in individual writing

          conferences, particularly with papers that need help in organization.

           

          You can find out more information and access class handouts on the

          point-predict technique on the Efiles at

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm (key word:

          point-predict)

          I've placed in the Efiles a discussion of Corbett's style analysis from

          the St. Martin's Guide to Teaching as well as two variations of this

          assignment I've used:

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm (keyword:

          style analysis)

           

          You may also be interested in Samantha Necamp's assignment in the Efiles

          on "Rhetorical effect of sentence length" which also uses some small

          numerical strategies to get students thinking more critically about style:

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm (keyword:

          sentence)

           

          -Joanna

           

          February 25, 2008

           

          There are two items and one (lengthy) teaching tip in this week's

          composition news....

           

          1. Pedagogy Workshop, 3/4 2:00: Mary Rotella will be leading a pedagogy

          workshop on teaching style in composition courses at 2:00 on Tuesday,

          March 4 in HUM 300. We’ll have snacks and Mary will have some great tips

          for teaching style and local revision. Everyone is invited. Please RSVP

          to Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu <mailto:Tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu>

          so that the appropriate amount of

          snacks can be purchased.

           

           

          2. Must evacuate for Fire Alarms: When fire alarms go off in buildings,

          all persons are required to evacuate the building unless special

          permission has been given prior to the incident. If you continue to hold

          class after a fire alarm has gone off, you could be held personally

          liable for any ensuing consequences. Last month, some classes failed to

          evacuate Davidson Hall after afire alarm was activated.

           

          3. Teaching Tip: Teaching Sentence Boundaries with Tag Questions—or the

          /Isn't it true that/__________? trick.

           

          This teaching tip applies only to a handful of students with severe

          grammar problems, but when it works it can be like magic. In part

          because I am frustrated that I learned this trick so late in my teaching

          career, I'm framing this teaching tip as a personal narrative.

           

          At least once a semester, I get a student whose writing looks something

          like the following:

           

          ***

          The term water is frequently used throughout the text. Indicating a

          significant meaning simply behind the title of the story: “The Man To

          Send Rain Clouds.” Leon simply is concerned with providing his

          grandfather with a proper Indian Burial. Even though he has requested

          the Father to bring his Holy water to the graveyard; suggesting he

          thinks no less of the Catholic rituals, he simply wants to make certain

          that Teofilo shall have plenty of water prior to being laid to rest.

          Indicating Teofilo may not enter a new life and pass through to the

          afterlife unless the proper amount of water is provided. Furthermore, he

          will be unable to bring Rain clouds to the reservation. Indicating to

          his people, he never crossed into the afterlife. Providing images to the

          Native Americans Teofilo was unsuccessful in beginning a new life.

          ***

           

          This is from an actual student paper (from a student who had already met

          the 101/102 requirement no less) and is pretty representative of the

          paper as a whole. Close to half of the sentences are fragments. The

          student has clearly had some lessons in punctuation-- the paragraph uses

          both a colon (correctly) and a semicolon (incorrectly)-- but these

          lessons have not helped the student identify sentence boundaries. This

          student's problems go far beyond what a simple punctuation lesson will

          teach.

           

          When I first started teaching, my philosophy was to delay commenting on

          such issues until the final draft on the assumption that one should

          always address content and organization first and hope the grammar

          issues take care of themselves as the student revises. I now think that

          is a mistake. I have not seen any evidence that major problems such as

          these take care of themselves and I *have* seen plenty of evidence that

          people both within and especially without the university judge such

          problems exceptionally harshly—often seeing such mistakes as evidence of

          character defects such as laziness or stupidity. Moreover, when people

          ask this student "What did you do in your composition classes anyway?"

          we don't want the answer to be "My teacher never really talked about

          grammar."

           

          My point is that we are doing a major disservice—both to students and

          ourselves—by not aggressively addressing such issues. I now decline to

          grade a paper until it is almost completely free of these glaring

          errors. (Logistically, I hand the paper back with a note explaining the

          problem, suggesting times I could meet, providing lots of encouragement

          and reassurance, and offering to grade the paper once it is returned

          with the errors eliminated).

           

          But once I get the student into my office, then what? When the

          particular student who wrote the above paper came to my office, I

          explained that there were lots of fragments and asked her to read the

          paper aloud, stopping to note any sentences she thought were incorrect.

          The student was just as likely to identify a correct sentence as a

          problem as she was a problem sentence. The problem was something that

          slowing down could not address.

           

          The trick to this problem was discovered by Rei Noguchi who recommends

          having the student try to transform each sentence into a question by

          saying /Isn't it true that_________/ before each potential sentence. So

          in the case above, we would have

           

          / Isn't it true that /the term water is frequently used throughout the

          text?

          / /

          / Isn't it true that/ indicating a significant meaning simply behind the

          title of the story: “The Man To Send Rain Clouds”?

          / /

          / Isn't it true that/ Leon simply is concerned with providing his

          grandfather with a proper Indian Burial?

          / /

          / Isn't it true that/ even though he has requested the Father to bring

          his Holy water to the graveyard?

           

           

          Believe it or not, the student who had absolutely no success in

          identifying sentence fragments when she just read the text, had about

          80% success with this method. She immediately "got" which were and were

          not sentences, and after about 15 min practice was able to apply it

          successfully to revise her text independently.

           

          There are lots of variations on the particular tag question used,

          including *"___________, */didn't it?/ and turning the sentence into a

          frame "I know that ___________."

           

          In Grammar and the Teaching of Writing (available in the Bonnie

          library), Noguchi describes the clever use of linguistic theory that led

          to this trick. This theory suggests that certain grammar structures and

          the rules for transforming them into other grammar structures are

          hard-wired into our brains and that people who might have difficulty

          recognizing one type of grammar structure can nonetheless recognize

          other "deeper" transformation of the same content. But you don't need to

          know or understand the theory to use the tip.

           

          Of course, this trick is exceptionally time-consuming for the student to

          implement and such students will need extra time on papers. One hopes

          that the practice in editing for fragments eventually embeds the correct

          version in the student's brain so that the tag question editing step can

          eventually be eliminated. However, I know of no research showing long

          term benefits for this strategy (but it sure would make a good

          dissertation or other research project!).

           

          -Joanna

           

           

          February 18, 2008

           

          There are four items and one teaching tip in this week's Composition News:

           

          1. Fall '08 Course Preference sheets: Course preference sheets for Fall

          '08 have been placed in your mailboxes. Please note that scheduling for

          Fall '08 will take place later this year than in previous years, partly

          in the hope that all Assistant Director positions will be decided by

          then and partly in the hope that we will have more information about the

          budget situation by early April. GTAs with summer appointments will be

          contacted shortly for their summer teaching preferences.

           

          2. Conference in Humanities Building—Room changes: Please note that the

          Louisville Conference on Literature will be using the Humanities

          Building on February 21-23, 2008. The building will be slightly more

          crowded this week and the following classes MUST move from their rooms

          to accommodate the conference:

           

          Thursday, February 21, 2008

           

          Engl 102-43 2:30 p.m. HM119

          Engl 102-49 2:30 p.m. HM215

          * *

          Friday, February 22, 2008

           

          Engl 102-07 9 a.m. HM108

          Engl 102-88 9 a.m. HM109

          Engl 102-09 10 a.m. HM119

          Engl 102-53 12 p.m. HM119

          Engl 102-24 1 p.m. HM210

          Engl 102-27 2 p.m. HM217

          Engl 101-03 9 a.m. HM117

          Engl 102-06 9 a.m. HM223

           

           

          3. Writing Center Survey: If you have not taken a few minutes to answer

          the very short Writing Center survey, please do so at :

          http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=_2bHQgP6170NMSnJjNptuS_2bQ_3d_3d

           

          This survey will help the Writing Center make better use of the services

          they provide Composition instructors.

           

          4. Feb 25 Last Day to Withdraw: If you have not yet provided your

          students with some form of substantive feedback, please be sure to do so

          by the end of this week so that students can make informed decisions

          about whether to withdraw from your class.

           

          5. Teaching Tip: Teaching Citation Rhetorically—A first step to Genre

          Analysis. One goal of 102 and advanced courses such as 303 (Technical

          Writing) and 309 (Academic Writing) should be to teach students that

          different disciplines have different styles, conventions, and

          expectations. You don't have to teach students to write in all these

          different styles, but you should teach them that the differences are

          there and give them some guidance on how to identify and interpret these

          differences as indicators of specific disciplinary values and reading

          practices—and not just arbitrary practices.

          One way to do this is to ask students to compare and contrast the

          citation styles of various disciplines and talk about what these

          citation styles suggest about what different academic fields privilege

          and value. For instance, MLA clearly privileges authorship: it is very

          easy to provide direct quotations in MLA and many of MLA's rules focus

          on handling exact quotations. By contrast, APA clearly privileges

          currency. It is also much easier in APA to attribute one idea to

          multiple authors than it is in MLA. Thus, where MLA focuses readers'

          attention on authorship, APA helps focus attention on the current state

          of knowledge on a topic.

           

          In contrast to both APA and MLA, scientific numbered citation styles

          such as CBE (Biology) or IEEE (Engineering) work to depersonalize

          knowledge: authors names do not appear in the text and the works cited

          is ordered not alphabetically but chronologically by the order in which

          the work was referenced in the paper. These conventions help make

          in-text citations concise (a number is used rather than a name) and

          simplify the process of attributing a single idea to multiple texts by

          allowing authors to refer to a range of numbers (For ex: [18-23]). In

          part, these conventions also reflect the nature of collaborative work in

          the sciences where it is common to have texts with as many as five or

          more authors (and relatively rare to have texts with only one author).

           

          Talking about the rhetoric of citation can be a good way to jump-start

          discussion into other disciplinary genre differences. For instance,

          after discussing citation styles, you might send students to the online

          databases to find three articles in different fields and talk about

          other genre differences, such as the frequent use of block quotations in

          Humanities journals or the frequent use of headings in Science journals

          which help readers skip around and read non-sequentially.

           

          I've placed a one-page handout on the Efiles that provides examples of

          citations in MLA, APA, and IEEE and asks students to compare and

          contrast. I've also placed a book chapter by Diane Dowdey that talks

          more about the rhetoric of citation practices. You can access these

          materials at

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm (keyword:

          citation)

           

          -Joanna

           

          February 11, 2008

           

          There are four items and one "teaching tip" this week:

           

          1. Feb 25 last day to withdraw: Please be aware that the last day for

          students to withdraw from classes is February 25th. A&S guidelines

          mandate that students have some formal feedback in each class before

          that date. Please make sure your students have received a grade by this

          date. You may also want to remind any students whose attendance and

          performance warrants concern of this deadline.

           

          2. Part-Time Lecturer teaching award nominations due March 3: This

          award, sponsored by Gray's Bookstore, honors the many fine Part-Time

          Lecturers who teach in and support the Composition Program. To nominate

          a part-time lecturer for this award send a letter of nomination to

          Joanna Wolfe by March 3. Self nominations are allowed. Nominees should

          then submit a teaching portfolio to the composition office by March 24,

          2008. More information will be distributed in mailboxes shortly.

           

          3. Personal copy bills due by March 15: Personal copy bills were put in

          your mailboxes on Feb 6. If you received a bill, please make every

          effort to pay it by March 15, 2008. Your payments help keep the copier

          supplied with paper and toner so we can continue to make copies

          available to you in the department at a reasonable cost that has not

          gone up in years.

           

          4. Writing Center Notifications: The Writing Center wishes to remind us

          that you can ask your students to request that the Writing Center staff

          send you notification of their visits to the Center.

           

          5. Teaching Tip: Teaching revision and organization with the backwards

          outline—and fun variations.

           

          One of the best things we can do for students is to teach them how to

          identify main ideas from supporting ideas and use this knowledge to

          develop a tightly organized essay. A common strategy for teaching

          organization (and revision) is the backwards outline. In a backwards

          outline, the writer starts with a finished paper and proceeds to create

          an "after-the-fact" outline of the paper. First, the writer identifies

          and writes down the thesis. Then for each paragraph, she writes down the

          most important main idea. After extracting this information, the writer

          articulates how each paragraph's main idea (1) supports the thesis and

          (2) is different from the main idea of the other paragraphs in the

          essay. Next, the writer indicates how each paragraph's main idea builds

          on that of the previous paragraph and notes what transitions are needed

          to help make this progression clear. You might also ask the writer to go

          through each paragraph and identify all the evidence or ideas supporting

          that paragraph's main idea and note which evidence does not belong in

          that paragraph.

           

          This activity jump-starts revision and helps students see the principles

          of organization. It is a good idea to model this with students first

          with a couple of papers before asking them to do it themselves.

           

          Mary Rotella has a fun and pedagogically effective variation on this

          exercise. After modeling some of the principles of revision and

          organization with students, she then gives them a pair of scissors, a

          glue stick, and colored paper and has them literally cut and paste

          sections of their essay into a backwards outline. So, first students cut

          out the sentence or sentences that articulate that main idea of the

          entire paper and paste it onto the colored paper. Then for each

          paragraph students cut out the sentence that best articulates that

          paragraph's main idea (or alternatively, students can just cut out the

          main phrases in the paper that support the thesis). I also have students

          draw lines from their main ideas for each paragraph to the concept or

          idea in the thesis statement that this paragraph illustrates. This

          exercise really drives home its point when students with weak theses or

          organization realize that there *are* no sentences for them to cut out.

           

          You can find Mary Rotella's assignment on the efiles:

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm (keyword:

          revision; or select "rotella" from the list of instructors). I have a

          plastic bag of (blunt) scissors and glue sticks in my office that

          instructors can borrow.

           

          -Joanna

           

          February 4, 2008

          There are two items and one "teaching tip" this week:

           

          1. Pedagogy workshops this week on helping students with online

          searching: Patrick Corbett will help us understand how students think

          about online searches and give insights and strategies to assist us in

          teaching students to improve their information-seeking skills. There

          are two opportunities to participate:

           

          Wednesday, Feb 6 1:00 HM 300

          Thursday, Feb 7 10:00, HM 300

           

          Please RSVP to tabetha.adkins@louisville.edu

           

          2. Writing Center Survey: The Writing Center would like to survey

          composition instructors about their use of and recommendations for the

          Writing Center. The survey is short and responses will be anonymous.

          Please take a moment to complete the survey at the link below:

           

          http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=_2bHQgP6170NMSnJjNptuS_2bQ_3d_3d

           

           

          3. Teaching Tip: Ranking. In his famous meta-analysis of research on

          writing, George Hillocks identifies "scales" (also known as ranking) as

          one of the few instructional activities that has a positive measurable

          impact on student writing (see the appendix of Teaching writing as

          reflective practice). Ranking makes use of criteria to help students

          evaluate and revise pieces of writing by others unknown to them. In a

          ranking exercise, an instructor usually discusses the criteria for

          evaluating a particular aspect of writing, gives students several essays

          or passages of varying quality, and asks students to rank these texts in

          order from best to worst.

           

          I use some form of ranking exercise in all of my writing classes (in

          some it is almost a weekly exercise). I have placed several handouts in

          the Efiles that show how ranking exercises can be used in various

          writing in the disciplines classes. I hope others will share ranking

          exercises that they have used in 101/102 or other writing classes. Such

          resources can be exceptionally helpful for first-time teachers who do

          not have a repository of student writing available.

           

          You can access the Efiles at:

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm

           

          To see the assignments I have just uploaded, use "ranking" as your

          keyword.

           

          -Joanna

           

           

          January 28, 2008

           

          There are four items and one "teaching tip" this week:

           

          1. Information Sheets: If you have not turned in your information sheet

          (they were photocopied on orange paper this semester), please drop it

          off in the composition office (321) as soon as possible. We use these

          sheets both so we have immediate access to your most recent contact

          information and office hours and so we have information to give to

          accrediting agencies about our instructors' qualifications.

           

          2. Class Rosters: Please double-check your class roster one last time to

          make sure that the students who are attending your class are actually on

          the roster. You can access the most up-to-date version of the roster on

          ULink.

           

          3. Ethnographies, Interview Assignments and IRB: I have received a few

          questions from instructors who assign ethnographies or other kinds of

          "human subjects" research projects about whether they need to receive

          clearance from the university's Institutional review board for research.

          The answer, you will be glad to hear, is that if an assignment is

          strictly for educational purposes and will not be published, it does not

          meet the university's definition of "research" and thus does not need to

          be reviewed. However, it is a good idea to discuss basic research ethics

          with students and have them give research participants a small consent

          statement. Here is a template for a consent statement that can be used

          for classroom assignments (NOTE: anything that will be published needs

          to go through a formal review process). I have also put a copy of this

          consent template in the Efiles:

           

          ***

          *Consent Statement*

          We are students at the University of Louisville doing a class exercise

          on DESCRIBE EXERCISE for COURSE NUMBER AND NAME. We are studying the

          experiences of non-technical users with various common products. We

          would like to invite you to help us with this project. Your

          participation in this user test is VOLUNTARY and you can withdraw at any

          time. The data collected will be CONFIDENTIAL and NOT identify you in

          any way. If you have any questions or comments, please contact our

          faculty advisor, INSTRUCTOR NAME, at INSTRUCTOR PHONE NUMBER. THANK YOU

          for your time and patience in supporting us in doing this class exercise

          in research!

          ***

           

          4. Louisville Writing Project: Jean Wolph, the director of the LWP, is

          interested in finding out if any current Ph.D. students (or possibly a

          master's student if they have had some preparation in research methods)

          are interested in K-12 writing/education/assessment and getting involved

          in an evaluative role in the 2007-2008 partnership either as

          dissertation work or just in conjunction with their experience at U of

          L. Cindy Britt (cynthia.britt@louisville.edu

          <mailto:cynthia.britt@louisville.edu>) has worked with the Louisville

          Writing Project for several years and would be happy to talk with anyone

          who might be interested.

           

          5. Teaching Tip—Alternatives to the Traditional Annotated Bibliography:

          One of the goals of 102 (or in fact any class we teach) should be to get

          students to move beyond the stereotypical high school "research paper"

          in which they simply reproduce what they have read. We should be

          teaching students to engage with sources in more critical ways by asking

          them to synthesize, evaluate, and ultimately build upon what they have

          read, in effect extending the conversation on a topic. However, when we

          assign a typical annotated bibliography that asks students to summarize

          what they have read, we are acting at cross-purposes with these goals by

          implying that we do simply expect them to summarize.

           

          I have posted some alternatives to the traditional annotated

          bibliography assignment on Efiles. One alternative comes from Linda

          Rogers, who assigns an "I-search" paper in which students write a

          narrative of the research processes. Another alternative posted on

          Efiles draws heavily on Joseph Harris' Rewriting by leading students

          through the steps of "Coming to Terms" with a source. Since Harris' text

          is so popular with instructors this year, I have temporarily placed a

          PDF of the first chapter in the Efiles.

           

          You can access these assignments (and the PDF from Rewriting) at:

          http://coldfusion.louisville.edu/jlwolf02/efiles/e_search.cfm

           

          -Joanna

           

           

          January 14, 2008

          Hello! I hope everyone has had a good first week of classes. There are four items in this week's Composition News:

           

          1. Basement Printers: There has been concern about the amount of toner and paper being consumed by the basement printers. These printers support composition instruction, and the department is not able to underwrite costs such as dissertation work or printing for classes that instructors are taking. Please also note that when printing materials for classes you are teaching, you should print one copy and then use it to photocopy the rest. Photocopying is much cheaper than printing. If usage of these printers continues to seem excessive, the department will need to more closely monitor printing use by individuals.

           

          2. Information Sheets: Please fill out your Information Sheets completely and return them to Linda Baldwin as soon as possible. The Information Sheets are in your mailboxes in 4H. We must have information such as office hours in order to answer student questions and information such as your educational background to fulfill accreditation requirements.

           

          3. Syllabus Copies with Checklist: Please turn in a copy of your syllabus to Linda Baldwin as soon as possible. Be sure to attach a syllabus checklist to the back of the syllabus. You can find copies of the checklist in the Composition Office or online at http://www.louisville.edu/a-s/english/composition/Syllabus%20Checklist.htm.

          Thank you to everyone who has already turned in a syllabus with a checklist attached.

           

          4. Fall Grades: If you have not already turned in a copy of your fall grades to Linda Baldwin, please do so as soon as possible.

           

          -Joanna

           

          January 7, 2008

          Happy New Year!

           

          Joanna Wolfe is the acting director of composition until Bronwyn returns

          from sabbatical in July. My office is directly across the hall from

          Linda in room 317. If I have not had an opportunity to meet you, please

          stop by and introduce yourself.

           

          There are five items this week:

           

          1. Composition website: There were some problems accessing the

          composition and CAI websites the last few days due to the new English

          department website. These problems have been addressed.

           

          2. Class Rosters: Please check your class roster regularly the first

          few weeks to make sure that the students who are attending your class

          are actually on the roster. You can access the most up-to-date version

          of the roster on ULink. Send any students who are not on the roster to

          Linda Baldwin.

           

          3. Syllabus Copies: Please turn in a copy of your syllabus to Linda

          Baldwin by Friday of this week. Be sure to attach a syllabus checklist

          to the back of the syllabus. You can find copies of the checklist in the

          Composition Office or online at

          http://www.louisville.edu/a-s/english/composition/Syllabus%20Checklist.htm.

           

          4. Over-enrollment Policy: Please do not tell students they can

          over-enroll in your courses (unless they are graduating seniors with a

          letter from their adviser). Business students who wish to over-enroll

          306 need a note from their advisor attesting that they are a business

          major and that they are eligible for graduate this Spring. All

          over-enrollments for composition courses must be approved by Linda. The

          over-enrollment policy for the program can be found at

          http://www.louisville.edu/a-s/english/composition/overenrollment.htm.

           

          5. Last day to withdraw: The last day for students to withdraw from a

          class without penalty is 2/25. Students must have received formal

          feedback by this date so they may make an informed decision about

          whether to stay in the class.

           

          -Joanna

          Composition Student Learning Outcomes


          The Student Learning Outcomes Statements for are intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of each course. The student learning outcomes, which were created through the participation of instructors in the Composition Program, are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the student learning  outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

          English 101 (Intro to College Writing)

          English 101 focuses on recognizing and responding to different rhetorical situations and developing effective writing processes. A student writer in English 101 should expect to: create and revise works in multiple genres; establish a clear purpose and sense of his or her presence and position in each work; and compose the equivalent of 18 - 20 pages of text over the course of the semester.

           


          Student Learning Outcomes for English 101:

           


          Rhetorical Knowledge

          Students will produce writing that responds appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations. Their writing should:

          • Focus on a clear and consistent purpose
          • Analyze and respond to the needs of different audiences
          • Employ a tone consistent with purpose and audience
          • Use a variety of genres or adapt genres to suit different audiences and purposes
          • Choose evidence and detail consistent with purpose and audience
          • Recognizes the utility of digital technologies for composition

           

          Critical Thinking

          Students will produce writing that abstracts, synthesizes, and represents the ideas of others fairly. Their writing should:

          • Summarize argument and exposition of a text accurately
          • Demonstrate awareness of the role of genre in the creation and reception of texts
          • Provide an understanding of knowledge as existing within a broader context, including the purpose(s) and audience(s) for which a text may have been constructed
          • Incorporate an awareness of multiple points of view
          • Shows basic skills in identifying and analyzing electronic sources, including scholarly library databases, the web, and other official databases

           

          Processes

          Students will produce writing reflective of a multi-stage composing and revising process. Their writing should:

          • Reflect a recursive composing process across multiple drafts
          • Illustrate multiple strategies of invention, drafting, and revision
          • Show evidence of development through peer review and collaboration

           

          Conventions

          Students will produce writing that strategically employs appropriate conventions in different writing situations. Their writing should:

          • Use structural conventions such as organization, formatting, paragraphing, and tone
          • Demonstrate control of such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Provide an understanding of the conventions of multimodal composition that comprise developing communication in the 21st century

           

          Confidence and Ownership

          In fulfilling the above outcomes, students will take ownership of their work and recognize themselves as writers who:

          • Have a growing understanding of their own voice, style, and strengths
          • Demonstrate confidence in their writing through frequent drafts
          • Can articulate their own positions relative to those of others


          Adopted November 2014

          English 102 (Intermed. College Writing)

          English 102 focuses on creating and answering questions through research and writing using academic sources, both primary and secondary. A student in English 102 should expect to: develop and answer research questions; articulate a position relative to others on a topic; address audiences inside and outside the academic community; and compose, revise, and edit multiple assignments equaling about 20 to 25 pages of text, including at least one extended research project.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 102:

          Rhetorical Knowledge

          Students will produce writing that responds appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations. Their writing should:

          • Articulate a purpose for research and their own position relative to the positions of others
          • Analyze the needs of an audience and the requirements of the assignment or task
          • Adapt an argument to a variety of genres and media to suit different audiences and purposes
          • Use evidence appropriate to audience and purpose

           

          Critical Thinking and Reading

          Students will produce writing that abstracts, synthesizes, and represents the ideas of others fairly. Their writing should:

          • Use evidence that responsibly represents other research and communities in and beyond the classroom
          • Demonstrate an understanding of a text as existing within a broader context, with a distinct audience and purpose
          • Represent and respond to multiple points of view in research and across community and cultural issues
          • Select academic and nonacademic sources with discernment

           

          Community Issues and Cultural Diversity

          Students will produce writing that communicates an understanding of how communities and cultural categories are constructed.  Their writing should:

          • Demonstrate awareness of multiple points of view
          • Question existing assumptions about culture and community
          • Describe actions being taken to address cultural and community issues
          • Address concerns of diverse audiences

           

          Processes

          Students will produce writing reflective of a multi-stage composing and revising process. Their writing should:

          • Use sources to discover and develop research questions and/or projects
          • Reflect recursive composing processes and strategies across multiple drafts and research assignments
          • Show evidence of research development through peer review and collaboration
          • Evaluate the credibility and relevance of both print and digital sources

           

          Conventions

          Students will produce writing that strategically employs appropriate conventions in different writing situations. Their writing should:

          • Use structural conventions such as organization, formatting, paragraphing, and tone
          • Demonstrate control of surface features such as grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Provide an understanding of the conventions of multimodal composition (in print and/or digital media) that comprise developing communication in the 21st century
          • Cite the work of others appropriately

          Adopted Spring 2015

          English 105 (Honors Composition)

          English 105 is an honors course that satisfies both the English 101 and English 102 requirements. To enroll in the course, incoming first-year students must have an ACT composite score of 28 or higher or the equivalent SAT score of 1240 (composite math and verbal scores) and a high school grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Because English 105 is the only first-year writing course honors students are required to take, it needs to cover the rhetorical and writing process concerns of English 101 as well as the writing with research concerns of English 102. Instructors teaching English 105 should also review the Student Learning Outcomes for English 101 and English 102. A student in English 105 should expect to write and revise essays in multiple genres, each with a clear purpose and sense of the writer’s presence and position. The student should also expect to create and answer questions through research and writing that draws upon written texts and other sources. A student in English 105 can expect to write four to six papers during the term, including at least one extended research essay, totaling about 20 to 25 pages of text.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 105:

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Focuses on a clear and consistent purpose
          • Analyzes and responds to the needs of different audiences
          • Employs a tone consistent with purpose and audience
          • Uses a variety of genres or adapts genres to suit different audiences and purposes, including writing with research sources
          • Chooses detail and evidence, including evidence from research sources, consistent with purpose and audience

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates awareness of the role of genre in making meaning from a given text
          • Demonstrates understanding of knowledge and information, including information from research sources, as existing within a broader context
          • Represents and responds to multiple points of view, including the positioning of research sources

          Processes

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Identifies a research question and develops a research strategy
          • Identifies, evaluates, and uses research sources to discover and focus a thesis
          • Demonstrates through reflection awareness of their own writing processes across multiple drafts
          • Demonstrates strategies of invention, drafting, and revision
          • Demonstrates ability to critique own work and work of peers

          Conventions

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control over conventions of format and presentation for different purposes and different audiences
          • Demonstrates control of such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Uses conventions of structure and format appropriate to the rhetorical situation, including purposes and conventions of documentation and multiple methods of citation

          English 303 (Scientific & Technical Writing)

          The focus of English 303 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in scientific and technical discourse communities. A student in English 303 should expect to create and revise documents in multiple genres. Each document should establish a clear purpose, sense of audience awareness, and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 303 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          Student Learning Outcomes Statement for English 303:

          The Student Outcomes Statement for English 303 is intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of this course. The student learning outcomes are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the student learning outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing and use oral communication skills that

          • Demonstrate knowledge of audience, which includes the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, technical vocabulary and detail, and tone when writing for both technical and non-technical audiences
          • Demonstrate knowledge of context, which includes analyzing professional cultures, social contexts, and audiences to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of writing
          • Demonstrate an ability to use, explain and integrate quantitative information with verbal prose to achieve particular rhetorical purposes
          • Demonstrate knowledge of research methods that produce professional documents, including analyzing professional contexts and assessing and summarizing information resources

          Processes

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates knowledge of the writing process, which means engaging various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents that respond effectively and ethically to scientific and technical situations and audiences
          • Demonstrates knowledge of collaborative strategies, such as writing in a team setting, working and communicating on-line, setting and achieving project goals, and responding constructively to peers’ work

          Conventions

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate technical vocabulary, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar
          • Demonstrates knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs and integrate a variety of written, visual, and oral elements of design

          English 306 (Business Writing)

          The focus of English 306 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in the professional world. A student in English 306 should expect to create and revise documents that incorporate elements of critical thinking as well as demonstrate intellectual and professional standards of effective communication. A student in English 306 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          By the end of English 306, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Appropriately responds to specific business writing situations with an understanding of context, purpose, and audience
          • Reflects an analysis of workplace problems and proposes clear, precise, and innovative solutions for a specific audience
          • Incorporates accurate and relevant evidence that supports well-reasoned solutions to workplace problems with a depth and breadth of significant, well-researched information
          • Demonstrates the ability to consider co-workers' perspectives with intellectual fairness, empathy, and humility
          • Adheres to professional standards and conventions of business communication genres such as letters, reports and resumes
          • Indicates the perseverance to revise writing to achieve clarity, precision, and appropriate tone, considering multiple perspectives and sensitivity to cultural differences
          • Incorporates a knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs
          • Reflects a control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar.

           

          English 309 (Inquiries into Writing)

          Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or 105

          Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in
          written communication (WR).

          The focus of English 309 is recognizing differing rhetorical situations and responding to them at an advanced level in appropriate modes for diverse audiences. A student in English 309 should expect to create and revise compositions in multiple genres. Compositions should establish a clear purpose, exhibit audience awareness, and reveal a sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 309 should expect to complete four to six projects of their own design. Themes may vary per section as determined by the instructor.

          Student Learning Outcomes for English 309:

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to compose texts and presentations that

          • Develop and negotiate an advanced rhetorical situation
          • Integrate and are informed by their own multiple literacies
          • Exhibit awareness of audience, including the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, and tone for a public text or particular discipline
          • Exhibit knowledge of context, which includes analyzing discourse communities to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of composing

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Evidence skill in reading and understanding texts that draw from multiple literacies
          • Indicate knowledge of research methods by analyzing social contexts, assessing the validity of sources, and summarizing and evaluating relevant information
          • Result from designing their own research projects by identifying questions, developing strategies, using primary and secondary sources to support arguments, and choosing effective methods of presentation
          • Acknowledge the complexity of issues by engaging and evaluating multiple points of view

          Processes

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Use writing as a tool for exploration and reflection
          • Employ strategies for composing as a recursive process of inventing, investigating, shaping, drafting, revising, and editing
          • Exhibit the ability to work collaboratively, including in-class, online, and in individual projects
          • Evidence the ability to reflect on their individual writing processes
          • Exhibit an awareness of the communicative options available for any project, text, or composition and make composing choices accordingly

          Conventions

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Indicate awareness of various modes of presentation and ability

          to select the mode(s) most appropriate to the audience and purpose

          • Address the expectations of readers in specific disciplines or public audiences by presenting ideas in appropriate language, format, and citation style

          105 Outcomes

          English 105

          English 105 is an honors course that satisfies both the English 101 and English 102 requirements. To enroll in the course, incoming first-year students must have an ACT composite score of 28 or higher or the equivalent SAT score of 1240 (composite math and verbal scores) and a high school grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Because English 105 is the only first-year writing course honors students are required to take, it needs to cover the rhetorical and writing process concerns of English 101 as well as the writing with research concerns of English 102. Instructors teaching English 105 should also review the Learning Outcomes for English 101 and English 102. A student in English 105 should expect to write and revise essays in multiple genres, each with a clear purpose and sense of the writer’s presence and position. The student should also expect to create and answer questions through research and writing that draws upon written texts and other sources. A student in English 105 can expect to write four to six papers during the term, including at least one extended research essay, totaling about 20 to 25 pages of text.

          Outcomes for English 105

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)
          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that
          • Focuses on a clear and consistent purpose
          • Analyzes and responds to the needs of different audiences
          • Employs a tone consistent with purpose and audience
          • Uses a variety of genres or adapts genres to suit different audiences and purposes, including writing with research sources
          • Chooses detail and evidence, including evidence from research sources, consistent with purpose and audience

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that
          • Demonstrates awareness of the role of genre in making meaning from a given text
          • Demonstrates understanding of knowledge and information, including information from research sources, as existing within a broader context
          • Represents and responds to multiple points of view, including the positioning of research sources

          Processes

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that
          • Identifies a research question and develops a research strategy
          • Identifies, evaluates, and uses research sources to discover and focus a thesis
          • Demonstrates through reflection awareness of their own writing processes across multiple drafts
          • Demonstrates strategies of invention, drafting, and revision
          • Demonstrates ability to critique own work and work of peers

          Conventions

          By the end of English 105, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that
          • Demonstrates control over conventions of format and presentation for different purposes and different audiences
          • Demonstrates control of such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
          • Uses conventions of structure and format appropriate to the rhetorical situation, including purposes and conventions of documentation and multiple methods of citation

          English 303 Outcomes

          Outcomes Statement for English 303—Scientific and Technical Writing

          The Outcomes Statement for English 303 is intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of each course. The course outcomes are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the Outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

          The focus of English 303 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in scientific and technical discourse communities. A student in English 303 should expect to create and revise documents in multiple genres. Each document should establish a clear purpose, sense of audience awareness, and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 303 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing and use oral communication skills that

          • Demonstrate knowledge of audience, which includes the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, technical vocabulary and detail, and tone when writing for both technical and non-technical audiences
          • Demonstrate knowledge of context, which includes analyzing professional cultures, social contexts, and audiences to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of writing
          • Demonstrate an ability to use, explain and integrate quantitative information with verbal prose to achieve particular rhetorical purposes
          • Demonstrate knowledge of research methods that produce professional documents, including analyzing professional contexts and assessing and summarizing information resources

          Processes

          By the end of English 306, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates knowledge of the writing process, which means engaging various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents that respond effectively and ethically to scientific and technical situations and audiences
          • Demonstrates knowledge of collaborative strategies, such as writing in a team setting, working and communicating on-line, setting and achieving project goals, and responding constructively to peers’ work

          Conventions

          By the end of English 303, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate technical vocabulary, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar
          • Demonstrates knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs and integrate a variety of written, visual, and oral elements of design

          306 Outcomes

          Outcomes Statement for English 306—Business Writing

          The Outcomes Statement for English 306 is intended to provide instructors and students with a sense of what kinds of knowledge students should be expected to acquire and demonstrate by the end of each course. The course outcomes, which were created through the participation of instructors in the Composition Program and the School of Business, are intended to create a sense of common purpose for the courses and clear expectations for the students. At the same time, the Outcomes have been written to maintain the flexibility in the program that allows individual instructors to continue the tradition of innovation and creativity in the classroom that is one of the great strengths of the University of Louisville Composition Program.

          English 306

          The focus of English 306 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in the professional world. A student in English 306 should expect to create and revise documents in multiple genres. Each document should establish a clear purpose, sense of audience awareness, and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 306 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 306, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing and use oral communication skills that

          • Demonstrate knowledge of audience, which includes the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, and tone when producing a professional document
          • Demonstrate knowledge of context, which includes analyzing professional cultures, social contexts, and audiences to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of writing
          • Demonstrate knowledge of research methods that produce professional documents, including analyzing professional contexts and assessing and summarizing information resources

          Processes

          By the end of English 306, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates knowledge of the writing process, which means engaging various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents that respond effectively and ethically to professional situations and audiences
          • Demonstrates knowledge of collaborative strategies, such as working and communicating on-line, setting and achieving project goals, and responding constructively to peers’ work

          Conventions

          By the end of English 306, students should demonstrate the ability to produce writing that

          • Demonstrates control of the editing process, including the production of documents which exhibit concise language, appropriate format, proper sentence structure, and standardized grammar
          • Demonstrates knowledge of document design, including the implementation of various principles of format, layout, and design of professional visual/verbal documents that meet multiple needs.

          309 Outcomes

          Rhetorical Knowledge (responding appropriately to a variety of rhetorical situations)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to compose texts and presentations that

          • Develop and negotiate an advanced rhetorical situation
          • Integrate and are informed by their own multiple literacies
          • Exhibit awareness of audience, including the ability to determine appropriate scope, genre, and tone for a public text or particular discipline
          • Exhibit knowledge of context, which includes analyzing discourse communities to determine how they shape the various purposes and forms of composing

          Critical Reading and Thinking (analyzing rhetorical positioning of texts)

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Evidence skill in reading and understanding texts that draw from multiple literacies
          • Indicate knowledge of research methods by analyzing social contexts, assessing the validity of sources, and summarizing and evaluating relevant information
          • Result from designing their own research projects by identifying questions, developing strategies, using primary and secondary sources to support arguments, and choosing effective methods of presentation
          • Acknowledge the complexity of issues by engaging and evaluating multiple points of view

          Processes

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Use writing as a tool for exploration and reflection
          • Employ strategies for composing as a recursive process of inventing, investigating, shaping, drafting, revising, and editing
          • Exhibit the ability to work collaboratively, including in-class, online, and in individual projects
          • Evidence the ability to reflect on their individual writing processes
          • Exhibit an awareness of the communicative options available for any project, text, or composition and make composing choices accordingly

          Conventions

          By the end of English 309, students should demonstrate the ability to produce texts and presentations that

          • Indicate awareness of various modes of presentation and ability

          to select the mode(s) most appropriate to the audience and purpose

          Address the expectations of readers in specific disciplines or public audiences by presenting ideas in appropriate language, format, and citation style

          Information for Prospective New Instructors

          Teaching Composition at U of L

          Fact Sheet for Prospective New Instructors

          Prerequisites for Teaching Composition at the University of Louisville:

          • Completing English 602 – Teaching College Composition, or having completed its equivalent. English 602 is offered during the Fall semester. New instructors typically take the course during their first semester of teaching. Students from the class, many of whom are experienced teachers, have told us that the course has been a valuable experience for them.

          • A Master’s Degree, or having completed at least 18 hours of coursework at the Masters level and making progress toward an M.A. in English or a related field (such as Linguistics, Humanities, Communication, or Education).

          • Participating in mentor groups for the first year. New teachers meet in small groups (usually four or five) to discuss their teaching. No more than one hour per week, usually less, is involved.

          Other information:

          • Current rate of pay (for Fall 2017) is $992.33 per credit hour, or $2977 for a typical three-hour course. (This rate is slightly higher [$1092.33 per credit hour] for an instructor who holds a Ph.D. in the field)

          • Applicants are asked to provide their scheduling preferences, however, seniority and other factors must be taken into consideration when scheduling courses.

          • If you are given a course to teach, you will be asked to sign a contract and to provide the Composition Office with a transcript of your college work and a current curriculum vitae. You will be sent a letter notifying you of your course assignment and a book order to complete and return to the Composition Office.

          • Instructors who teach at least two courses (6 credit hours) during a semester are eligible for 3 credit hours worth of tuition remission in that semester.

          • If you are interested in applying to teach in the Composition Program, please send a cover letter and current c.v. to the Director of Composition.

          The 2010 Symposium of Student Writing

          PDF document icon SoSW-Color.pdf — PDF document, 54 KB (55633 bytes)

          Grievance Procedure

          Students who have questions or concerns about their grades, the class, or an assignment are encouraged to see their instructor as soon as possible. If not satisfied with that discussion, students may contact an Assistant Director of Composition, Jeb Herrin, Claire Jackson, or Dakoda Smith, in Hum LL04H, 852.6060.  Their e-mail addresses and office hours can be found at Contact.

          Alternate ways to receive credit for English 101 or 102

          Before continuing, please take a look at the Outcomes statements for English 101 and English 102. These courses have a unique focus on writing for a range of audiences and rhetorical purposes and many writing classes taken at other institutions do not meet the intended outcomes for University of Louisville's English 101 and 102 first-year writing courses.

          There are three ways to receive an exemption from taking English 101 or 102. Follow the links to learn more about each option.

          1. Transfer in a writing course(s) taken at another university.

          2. Turn in a portfolio of writing composed prior to matriculating to UofL

          3. Take the Advanced Placement Exam.

          Receiving Transfer Credit

          1. Transfer in a writing course(s) taken at another university

          If you have taken a composition or communication course at another university, this course may meet the first year writing requirement of English 101. If you have taken two composition or communication courses at another university, this second course may meet the requirement for English 102. In no case will a single writing course taken at another university count for both English 101 and English 102 credit.

          In most situations, Admissions Transfer Services should be able to determine whether the courses you took at another institution are equivalent to English 101 or English 102 at the University of Louisville. In those cases where admissions is unable to make a determination, you should obtain a syllabus from the writing course you took and ask the composition office to evaluate the course based on similarity to the outcomes stated for English 101 or 102.

          Take a careful look at the Outcomes statements for English 101 and English 102 to see if the writing course you took seems to have similar outcomes to UofL's first-year composition courses. Note that UofL's composition courses focus on writing for a range of audiences and purposes and are not limited to the study of literature or to creative writing. Thus, English classes that focus on reading literature or composing creative works of fiction or poetry may not count towards UofL's first-year writing requirement.

          Turning in a Writing Portfolio

          2. Turn in a portfolio of writing composed prior to matriculating to UofL

          Students may submit a portfolio containing a cover letter and at least 3 pieces of writing completed prior to matriculating to UofL to be evaluated for credit for English 101 or 102. Portfolios must be submitted by the end of the student's first semester at UofL. Portfolio credit is awarded sparingly: approximately 15% of portfolios receive credit for English 101. Portfolio credit is rarely awarded for English 102. Read more about the portfolio credit procedure here.

          Take the AP Test.

          3. Take the Advanced Placement Test

          Students who receive a score of 3, 4, or 5 on the English Language Advanced Placement test will be awarded credit for English 101 (3 hrs.).
          Students receiving a score of 3, 4, or 5 on the English Literature Advanced Placement test will be awarded credit for English 250 (3 hrs.).
          You can read more about Advanced Placement here: http://louisville.edu/admissions/apply/test-credit/ap-credit

          Submitting a Writing Portfolio for Possible 101 or 102 Credit

          Students entering college for the first time or students transferring from another institution (and who have not already received credit for courses recognized by the University of Louisville as being equivalent to English 101 or English 102) may submit a writing portfolio evidencing their ability to compose college-level academic writing. The composition office will evaluate the writing for possible placement out of English 101 or 102. Only a small percentage of portfolios receive exemption. Portfolios must be submitted by the end of the student's first semester at the University of Louisville. Portfolios submitted after this deadline will be returned without evaluation.

          Academic advising should be able to tell you your score when you meet to discuss your schedule, or you may contact one of the Assistant Directors of Composition at Contact four weeks after submitting your portfolio to find out your score.

          • Who can submit a portfolio

          • When you should submit your portfolio

          • What to include in the portfolio

          • What outcomes you can expect from the portfolio process

          • Where to submit your portfolio

          • Additional information

          Who can submit a portfolio

          Incoming first-year college students and transfer students in their first semester at UofL may submit a portfolio. Students who have been attending classes at UofL for several semesters are not eligible for portfolio evaluation. This policy is intended to ensure that students are prepared to do college-level writing before taking advanced academic courses. Students may submit a portfolio only once.

          When you should submit your portfolio

          Submit your portfolio as early as possible—preferably prior to attending UofL. Early portfolio submission ensures proper and timely placement into the appropriate college writing course. In all cases, portfolios must be submitted prior to the end of your first semester at UofL. Portfolios submitted after this deadline will be returned without evaluation.

          We require that portfolios be submitted in the first semester so that you can be placed into the proper-level writing course as soon as possible and before you begin attempting advanced academic coursework. English 101 and 102 lay the foundation for future college-level work. When students try to delay taking these courses and prematurely enroll in advanced courses, they often find they are not fully prepared to succeed at the academic writing required in such courses

          What to include in the portfolio

          Each portfolio should contain

          1. At least three texts that together total at least 12 double-spaced pages demonstrating your ability and preparation to compose extended, college-level academic essays.Usually, these will be writings that you composed while in high school (and for Kentucky students may include work submitted as part of their KIRIS portfolio), but they may also be three recent texts that adequately display your writing skills. At least one of these texts should demonstrate that you can compose a longer essay. While you may include creative writing, more traditionally academic genres—including argumentative, expository, research, and transactional essays—are generally more effective in showcasing your academic writing ability.
          2. A reflective cover letter that details how the writing included in the portfolio meets the Outcomes for English 101 and 102.Please read the Outcomes statements carefully. A successful reflective letter will refer to specific details about or point to specific passages in the submitted pieces and explain how these instances meet the particular language in the Outcomes statement. A successful cover letter will also talk about the process of composing the included texts, the intended audiences for these texts, and how the writing included illustrates an ability to write for a range of rhetorical purposes and goals. Again, be sure to show how all of these texts evidence your capability to meet specific criteria from the outcomes statement. A strong reflective cover letter is key to a successful portfolio.
          3. A Portfolio Authenticity Form.All students must fill out the front of the form completely and have it signed by a high school or post-secondary counselor or teacher from the outside institution (other than U of L) who is familiar with their writing. If it is not possible to obtain a signature on the authenticity sheet, the portfolio must include a letter from the adviser or teacher from the outside institution that the student worked with that verifies the authenticity.

          What outcomes you can expect from the portfolio process

          It will take approximately four weeks to evaluate your portfolio. Approximately 10-15% of students can expect to receive exemption from English 101. Exemption from English 102 is rarely given. You can expect one of the following outcomes from the portfolio process:

          1. No exemption: This is the most common outcome.
          2. Direct placement into English 102: The portfolio is determined to demonstrate the ability to produce superior work in English 101 but not English 102. The student is granted three hours of college credit for English 101 and is still expected to fulfill the second three hours of the written communication requirement (i.e. English 102). Approximately 10-15% of portfolios will receive this outcome.
          3. Exemption from both English 101 and 102: The portfolio is determined to demonstrate the ability to produce superior work in English 101 and English 102. The student is granted six hours of college credit and fulfills the general education written communication requirement. This outcome is very rare.

          Under no circumstances can students be placed into English 105: Honors English based upon their portfolio scores. English 105 is an honors course only open to students who are admitted into the university honors program

          Reminder: Academic advising should be able to tell you your score when you meet to discuss your schedule, or you may contact four weeks after submitting your portfolio to find out your score.

          Where to submit your portfolio:

          Submit your portfolio and completed portfolio authenticity form  to:

          The Composition Office - Portfolio
          Room 315 C
          Bingham Humanities Building
          University of Louisville
          Louisville, KY 40292

          Additional Information:

          For additional questions, please contact the Assistant Directors of Composition at Contact or call the composition office at (502) 852-6896.

          Portfolio Authenticity Form

          PDF document icon portfolio_authenticity.pdf — PDF document, 343 KB (351575 bytes)

          Adobe Image

          Portfolio Authenticity Form
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          Banner image for U of L Composition Program

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          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon english-101-model-syllabus-fall-2015 (3).docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 39 KB (40365 bytes)

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon engl102-model-syllabus-fall-2015 (1).docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 34 KB (35718 bytes)

          Model English 101 Syllabus

          Model English 101 Syllabus

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon english-101-model-syllabus-fall-2015 (3).docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 39 KB (40365 bytes)

          Model 102 Syllabus

          model 102 syllabus

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon engl102-model-syllabus-fall-2015 (1).docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 34 KB (35718 bytes)

          Composition Observation Template

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon ObservationTemplateRevisedOct.2015.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 5 KB (5238 bytes)

          Composition Observation Template

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon ObservationTemplateRevisedOct.2015.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 5 KB (5238 bytes)

          English 102 Model Syllabus

          Updated 8/1/16

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon engl102-model-syllabus-fall-2016.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 34 KB (34899 bytes)

          English 101 Model Syllabus

          Revised 8/4/16 lvb

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon english-101-model-syllabus-fall-2016.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 40 KB (41514 bytes)

          Portfolio Authenticity Form

          Revised 8/4/16 lvb

          PDF document icon Portfolio Authenticity Form.pdf — PDF document, 117 KB (120521 bytes)

          102 Common Syllabus w Appendix

          lvb 8/16/16

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon engl102-model-syllabus-fall-2016 w Appendix.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 35 KB (36643 bytes)

          101 Common Syllabus w Appendix

          lvb 8/16/16

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon english-101-model-syllabus-fall-2016 w Appendix.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 42 KB (43154 bytes)

          Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form

          Updated 2/23/2017

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form.Updated 2.23.2017.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 17 KB (18357 bytes)

          Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form Landscape

          Form updated 1/23/17 and done in landscape to allow enough room to write on lines.

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form.Updated 2.23.2017 Landscape.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 18 KB (18965 bytes)

          Syllabus Checklist Fall 2015 Revised-2 4.4.17

          Linda's office number changed from HM 321 to HM 315C on this version

          Microsoft Word Document icon Syllabus Checklist Fall 2015 Revised-2 4.4.17.doc — Microsoft Word Document, 47 KB (48640 bytes)

          PDF document icon 2017 Prompt and Requirements.pdf — PDF document, 344 KB (353186 bytes)

          Pedagogy Fellow Initiative

          The University of Louisville and the Composition Program in particular offer many professional development opportunities for instructors to improve their pedagogy. To better incentivize participation in these pedagogy workshops and make visible the often-invisible work of professional development, the Comp Team has develop a new Pedagogy Fellow Initiative.

          Participation in pedagogy workshops is always a component of instructors’ annual evaluations that are kept on file in the Composition Office. Additionally, instructors may attend any pedagogy-related professional development opportunities on campus to receive either of the following incentives.

          Course Scheduling Preferences

          Instructors who attend at least 1 pedagogy workshop will granted greater priority (within their teaching tier) for scheduling preferences the next semester. For example, a first-year graduate teaching assistant who completes 2 pedagogy workshops in one semester will be assigned courses before the other first-year graduate teaching assistants who didn’t complete any.

          Pedagogy Fellow Certificate

          Instructors who attend 4 pedagogy workshops within a year and submit a 1-2 pages (or about 750 words) reflection on specific ways those workshops have (or haven’t) impacted their teaching will be considered Pedagogy Fellows for that year and will receive a certificate signed by the Director Composition to document this accomplishment.

          The Composition Program will keep a sign-in sheet for any pedagogy workshops offered within the department. If you are attending any workshops outside the department, please contact an Assistant Director of Composition (ADC) ( e-mail addresses located at  Contact) for information on how to verify attendance. Please also contact an ADC if you are unsure whether a professional development opportunity counts as pedagogy training.

          Please note: Institutes or academies related to teaching (e.g. GTA Academy or Delphi U), while highly encouraged, are not included in this initiative. If you’d like to be considered for an exception, please contact an ADC.

          You can search for relevant professional development opportunities at any of the following links:

          Contact an ADC with any further questions, comments, or concerns.

          Interested in hosting your own Pedagogy Workshop?

          Yes, it counts toward the certificate! Please email the following information to one of the Assistant Directors of Composition (e-mail addresses located at Contact).

          • Workshop Title
          • 300-word (max) abstract describing the workshop, including:
            • Topic/activities
            • Why this is a needed workshop
            • What practical takeaways participants get

          Successful workshop proposals will have both theoretical and (especially) practical components that can tangibly improve instructors’ teaching.

          Authenticity Form 12.2018

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form.Updated 2.23.2017 Landscape.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 16 KB (16536 bytes)

          Authenticity Form 12.2018

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form.Updated 2.23.2017 Landscape.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 16 KB (16536 bytes)

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form.Updated 2.23.2017 Landscape.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 16 KB (16536 bytes)

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form.Updated 2.23.2017 Landscape.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 16 KB (16536 bytes)

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Portfolio Placement Authenticity Form.Updated 1.2.18 Landscape.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 16 KB (16594 bytes)

          Diversity and Inclusion in the Classroom

          Marian Vasser's powerpoint presentation from August 2018

          PDF document icon Diversity and Inclusion in the Classroom - English Comp.pdf — PDF document, 1.54 MB (1618193 bytes)

          Social Identity Wheel

          From Marian Vasser's powerpoint presentation August 2018

          PDF document icon Social Identity Wheel.pdf — PDF document, 13 KB (14086 bytes)

          Active Learning Activities

          Presented by Jen Anderson at Comp Orientation 9/17/2018

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon CDI_ActiveLearningActivities.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 20 KB (21224 bytes)

          Active Learning Activities

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon CDI_ActiveLearningActivities.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 20 KB (21224 bytes)

          Revision Policy

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Revision policy.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 13 KB (13556 bytes)

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Revision policy.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 13 KB (13556 bytes)

          Observation of online classes

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Professional Development Observations for Online Composition Classes.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 60 KB (61579 bytes)

          Prof Dev Template Face to Face

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon ProfessionalDevelopmentObservationTemplateforFacetoFaceClasses.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 13 KB (13857 bytes)

          Observation procedures and template for online classes

          application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon Observation Procedures and Templete for Online Composition Classes.Dec2020.docx — application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 59 KB (60907 bytes)