Summer 2024

Humanities Courses

In this interactive course, students will use a humanities lens to explore questions about what it means to be human: How and why have individuals throughout history and around the globe sought to make sense of their world through creative expression? How do our interactions with society and the environment around us shape our sense of self? How do we in turn shape society and our environment? Throughout the course, students will engage with examples of cultural products from a range of humanities disciplines, such as art history, literature, religion, music history, theater, film, philosophy, and language and linguistics. In the course of this engagement, students will practice skills that are not only essential for humanities classrooms but extend to any workplace: thinking critically, interpreting evidence, and communicating effectively, all while striving towards a deeper understanding of diversity in order to respond creatively and constructively to the challenge of difference.

Course/Section Session Days/Times Instructor
HUM 105-50 Summer 2 (May 28–July 2) DISTANCE EDUCATION P. Wessels
Note: This section uses zero-cost course materials/textbooks ($0).
HUM 105-51 Summer 3 (July 8–August 9) DISTANCE EDUCATION K. Balog
Note: This section uses zero-cost course materials/textbooks ($0).
HUM 105-52 Ten Week (May 28–August 8) DISTANCE EDUCATION B. Hayes

Interdisciplinary study of the arts and humanities in contemporary American culture emphasizing the convergence of European, African, Hispanic, Asian, and indigenous cultures, as well as the distinguishing characteristics of each culture as revealed in three of the following areas: fine arts, drama, literature, philosophy, religion, and popular entertainment.

Course/Section Session Days/Times Instructor
HUM 152-50 Summer 2 (May 28–July 2) DISTANCE EDUCATION D. Wilder
Note: This section uses low-cost course materials/textbooks (under $50).
HUM 152-51 Ten Week (May 28–August 8) DISTANCE EDUCATION M. Johmann

A comparative introduction to Western world religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) through a systematic survey of history, scripture and interpretation, doctrine, practice, and aspects of religious material and literary culture.

Course/Section Session Days/Times Instructor
HUM 219-50 Summer 2 (May 28–July 2) DISTANCE EDUCATION M. Moazzen
Note: This section uses zero-cost course materials/textbooks ($0).

Introduction to the fundamentals of film form and film content, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, genre, acting, and sound, with emphasis on relationships between these elements and diverse cultural contexts.

Course/Section Session Days/Times Instructor
HUM 224-50 Summer 2 (May 28–July 2) DISTANCE EDUCATION J. Richie
HUM 224-51 Summer 3 (July 8–August 9) DISTANCE EDUCATION E. Lewis
Note: This section uses low-cost course materials/textbooks (under $50).

A film theory course that introduces students to theoretical approaches to cinema that may include structuralism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, and post-structuralism, as well as historical, cultural, and gender theory.

Course/Section Session Days/Times Instructor
HUM 324-50 Summer 3 (July 8–August 9) DISTANCE EDUCATION L. Mercer
Note: This section uses low-cost course materials/textbooks (under $50).

Analysis of sex roles as embodied in classic works in philosophy, literature, history, drama, and art in ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary times.

Course/Section Session Days/Times Instructor
HUM 331-51 Summer 1 (May 6–24) DISTANCE EDUCATION S. Bertacco
Note: Cross-listed with WGST 303-51.

Mythology of Greek gods and goddesses through the study of ancient texts, major sites of worship, and ancient representations of these deities.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Session Days/Times Instructor
HUM 338-50 Summer 2 (May 28–July 7) DISTANCE EDUCATION S. Watkins

Prerequisite: Consent of chair of Humanities or undergraduate advisor.

Note: Course cannot be repeated for academic credit toward the degree.

Course/Section Session Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 550-03 Ten Week (May 28–August 8) Public Humanities, Climate Change, and National Parks TBD F. Jamison

This public humanities course explores the historical and current effects of climate change in Kentucky. We will partner with the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park to learn how the National Park Service has incorporated climate change education at their sites. Students will research and create projects that address these environmental justice issues. We will meet online and in person.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 650-04. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student. (3) This section requires permission from the department. (4) This section uses zero-cost course materials/textbooks ($0).

Prerequisite: Approval of chair or graduate advisor.

Course/Section Session Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 650-04 Ten Week (May 28–August 8) Public Humanities, Climate Change, and National Parks TBD F. Jamison

This public humanities course explores the historical and current effects of climate change in Kentucky. We will partner with the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park to learn how the National Park Service has incorporated climate change education at their sites. Students will research and create projects that address these environmental justice issues. We will meet online and in person.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 550-03. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student. (3) This section requires permission from the department. (4) This section uses zero-cost course materials/textbooks ($0).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Course/Section Session Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 673-20 Ten Week (May 28–August 8) Sigmund Freud on Humanism and Culture W 04:00pm–8:00pm N. Polzer

The course will explore synergy between psychoanalytic theory and culture by reading works by Sigmund Freud, focusing on his four writings on religion and readings on the Uncanny, jokes, and dream interpretation, as well as one example of Freud as psychoanalyst. Readings and assignments will show how Freud’s psychoanalytic theory can be applied to understanding and analysis of cultural phenomenon, artistic works, and social institutions. To this end, some of the work of scholars who have used Freud to advantage, Peter Gay and Winfried Menninghaus, will be surveyed to illustrate expert Freudian readings of culture.