Spring 2023

Humanities Courses

An introduction to critical thinking about world culture through selected readings in major literary forms from ancient times to 1700.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 101-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION K. Green

In this interactive course, students will use a humanities lens to explore questions about what it means to be human: How and why have individuals throughout history and around the globe sought to make sense of their world through creative expression? How do our interactions with society and the environment around us shape our sense of self? How do we in turn shape society and our environment? Throughout the course, students will engage with examples of cultural products from a range of humanities disciplines, such as art history, literature, religion, music history, theater, film, philosophy, and language and linguistics. In the course of this engagement, students will practice skills that are not only essential for humanities classrooms but extend to any workplace: thinking critically, interpreting evidence, and communicating effectively, all while striving towards a deeper understanding of diversity in order to respond creatively and constructively to the challenge of difference.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 105-01 MWF 10:00am–10:50am P. Wessels
HUM 105-02 MWF 11:00am–11:50am N. Polzer
HUM 105-03 MWF 12:00pm–12:50pm H. Salo
HUM 105-04 MWF 01:00pm–01:50pm E. Lewis
HUM 105-05 MWF 02:00pm–02:50pm A. Bittner
HUM 105-06 TTh 09:30am–10:45am D. Wilder
HUM 105-07 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm R. Ismaila
HUM 105-08 TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm S. Dave
HUM 105-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION L. Mercer
HUM 105-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) C. Stewart
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

Introduction to the fundamental vocabulary, principles, analytical processes, and styles of the creative arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, and the printed image), with an emphasis on the performing arts (theatre, dance, music, film, and television). The course will include a variety of individual and group activities focused on creativity and performance in the classroom and in the community.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 151-01 T 04:00pm–06:45pm K. Hill

Interdisciplinary study of the arts and humanities in contemporary American culture emphasizing the convergence of European, African, Hispanic, Asian, and indigenous cultures, as well as the distinguishing characteristics of each culture as revealed in three of the following areas: fine arts, drama, literature, philosophy, religion, and popular entertainment.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 152-01 (HONORS) MWF 11:00am–11:50am M. Johmann
Note: This section is restricted to students active in the University Honors Program. Please call Honors at 502-852-6293 for more information.
HUM 152-02 MWF 11:00am–11:50am F. Schildknecht
HUM 152-03 MWF 01:00pm–01:50pm F. Schildknecht
HUM 152-04 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm J. Fraley
HUM 152-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION L. Mercer
HUM 152-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) J. Cresseveur
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

The study of the principal world religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and indigenous traditions) in their cultural contexts.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 216-01 (HONORS) TTh 2:30pm–03:45pm R. Fuller
Note: This section is restricted to students active in the University Honors Program. Please call Honors at 502-852-6293 for more information.
HUM 216-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION T. Burden
HUM 216-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) M. Hagan
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

A survey of the history, beliefs, and sacred literatures of the religions of South and East Asia from the perspectives of the humanities and the history of religions.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 218-01 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm M. Hagan

A comparative introduction to Western world religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) through a systematic survey of history, scripture and interpretation, doctrine, practice, and aspects of religious material and literary culture.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 219-01 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm D. Penwell

Introduction to the fundamentals of film form and film content, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, genre, acting, and sound, with emphasis on relationships between these elements and diverse cultural contexts.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 224-01 MW 04:00pm–05:15pm E. Polley
HUM 224-02 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm L. Mercer
HUM 224-03 Th 04:00pm–06:45pm J. Richie
HUM 224-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION D. Carpenter
HUM 224-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) D. Carpenter
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

Interdisciplinary study of the modern period, from the Enlightenment to the present, with emphasis on the distinctive characteristics of the arts, literature, and religious and philosophical thought in their cultural context.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 304-01 TTh 09:30am–10:45am M. Hagan

The interdisciplinary study of religion as a cultural phenomenon, with emphasis on individual, social, mythic, literary, and textual manifestations.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 308-01 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm K. Kleinkopf

This course examines the intersections of religion and culture. It does not focus on religious texts; instead, its focus is on how religion plays a part in people’s everyday lives as a source of meaning and order, as well as by creating a nexus of rituals, communities, spaces, and identities. It analyzes world religion (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), as well as local and indigenous religious traditions from a cultural perspective.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 310-01 MW 04:00pm–05:15pm M. Moazzen

An introduction to Islam’s most sacred text, the Qur’an, which contains the fundamental creed, rituals, ethics, and laws of Islam. An examination of the historical and cultural contexts of its origin and subsequent interpretation, as well as its main themes.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 313-01 MW 02:00pm–03:15pm M. Moazzen

This course will explore the richness of religious diversity within Judaism past and present by focusing on what are considered “normative” and “alternative” beliefs, rituals, and practices.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 315-01 MWF 01:00pm–01:50pm N. Polzer
Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 320-01 The Drama of Resistance TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm A. Hall

Drama requires conflict, so I thought we would examine plays that resist oppression in various forms—from explicit political tyranny to more subtle and systemic methods of both resistance and oppression. Our discussion and analysis of the plays will refine and develop existing research and writing skills, as well as instill what I hope will be a lifelong appreciation of drama, writing, and research. Though the specific plays may change, we could read works such as Antigone, Lysistrata, Richard III, A Man for All Seasons, A Doll’s House, Enemy of the People, The Crucible, Statements, Taking Sides, For Colored Girls, BlastedBlood at the Root, Speak Truth to Power, Cloud Nine, Top Dog/UnderdogHow I Learned to Drive, The Thanksgiving Play, etc. And I am open to suggestions, particularly if the plays are readily available as PDFs.

Study of important developments in the technique and content of fiction in selected European masterpieces, including works representative of several continental traditions.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 321-01 TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm M. Johmann

A film theory course that introduces students to theoretical approaches to cinema that may include structuralism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, and post-structuralism, as well as historical, cultural, and gender theory.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 324-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION L. Mercer

Analysis of sex roles as embodied in classic works in philosophy, literature, history, drama, and art in ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary times.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 331-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION J. White
Note: Cross-listed with WGST 303-50.

A survey of the universal aspects of Native American religions, cosmologies, and practices from prior to European contact until the present day.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 336-01 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm H. Cruz

Mythology of Greek gods and goddesses through the study of ancient texts, major sites of worship, and ancient representations of these deities.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 338-01 TTh 09:30am–10:45am B. Kilpatrick
HUM 338-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION S. Watkins
HUM 338-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) S. Watkins

Study of the Confucian, Taoist, Buddhist, and Shinto religions and their interrelationships with the cultures of China, Korea, and Japan.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 343-02 MWF 12:00pm–12:50pm P. Pranke
Note: Cross-listed with AST 343-02.

The varieties of religious experience in the United States: native traditions, manifestations and adaptations of Christianity, and other religions practiced in the United States.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 344-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION R. Fuller

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 361-01 Renegade Thinkers TTh 2:30pm–3:45pm M. Hagan

Throughout the history of philosophy, there have been many “renegade” thinkers that deterritorialize the ground of the canonical works and the personas of the academic tradition. Students will examine the works of several renegade thinkers, including Diogenes, Ken Kesey, Robert Anton Wilson, Aldous Huxley, Philip K. Dick, Timothy Leary, Alan Watts, and Ken Wilber. We will investigate the syncretic and interdisciplinary aspects of each philosopher, as well as their relationship with the canonical works and personas.

HUM 361-02 Music and Sound in Film TTh 2:30pm–3:45pm D. Burke

Over the course of the semester, we will study representative films from different eras, cultures, and genres. Through discussions of films and readings as well as written assignments, we will dig into topics including film sound theory, the history of film sound technology, and sociocultural and historical contexts for trends in film sound styles and aesthetics. The course will develop critical thinking and listening skills that are unique to film sound. Given the global ubiquity of film, these skills will benefit students as a form of cultural literacy.

Note: Co-listed with MUH 315-01.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 362-50 Race, Gender, and Human Behaviors DISTANCE EDUCATION L. Anthony

The course is an elective that examines human behaviors in relation to race and gender from psychological, sociological, and technological perspectives. These perspectives will be viewed in terms of contemporary societies throughout the African diaspora. At the end of the term, students will demonstrate their knowledge by creating a presentation for an adverse audience while taking a supportive position of a social issue relating to race and/or gender.

Note: Co-listed with PAS 300-50 and WGST 391-50.

Notes: (1) May be repeated when topics vary. (2) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 363-01 Jewish Comedy in America and Beyond TTh 11:00am–12:15pm R. Omer-Sherman

This class draws on an exciting range of essays, fiction, film, shorter videos (and of course jokes) to explore just why, known over the centuries as the “People of the Book,” the Jews have become even better known in our own time as the “People of the Joke.” With a rich history of popular humor production dating from Yiddish modernists in the 19th century onward, Jewish humor writers and artists contributed heavily to the entertainment world in a variety of locales. The comedy industry, particularly in the United States, came to be dominated by Jewish writers, whose cultural histories frequently played a distinct role in their comedic products. We will survey the development of Jewish humor as a cultural phenomenon during the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing mainly on the history of American Jewish comedic output, but also explore Jewish material from Eastern Europe, the USSR, and Israel as well as the relation of Jewish humor to anxiety, outsider perspectives, antisemitism and oppression, including the trauma of the Holocaust. In examining the development of Jewish humor, we will gain insight into a variety of Jewish cultures and the ways in which they are affected by historical conditions, as well as the important catalysts of acculturation, assimilation, and difference in forming Jewish comic consciousness. Graded assignments include written essays and in-class writing prompts.

Note: Co-listed with ENGL 371-01.
HUM 363-50 Gender and Social Media DISTANCE EDUCATION K. Hill

An introduction to technologies and their impact on our everyday lives, and how we perceive ourselves through social media use. The primary focus of this course is to explore, through a gendered lens, how technology such as the internet and social media has structured our lives. Including, but not limited to gendered technologies, it’s influence on how we categorize gender, sexuality, race, and class while examining how technology and social media has shaped our identity today.

Note: Co-listed with WGST 393-53.

This course explores various religious beliefs, practices, experiences, traditions, and institutions of African-descended people in the United States. Students will be introduced to a range of African American religious traditions and a variety of perspectives within African American religious thought. These traditions and their respective beliefs and practices will be situated within their proper historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 377-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION S. McAllister
Note: Cross-listed with PAS 317-50.

A study of the historical events, with analysis and evaluation of the impact of the Holocaust and other modern global genocides on humanistic thought and imagination.

Note: Credit may not be received for this course and HIST 387.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 387-01 MWF 1:00pm–1:50pm M. Blum
Note: Cross-listed with HIST 387-01.

A survey of major theories and methodologies in the academic study of religion from a historical perspective.

Prerequisites: Completion of 90 hours and permission of instructor.

Notes: (1) Credit may not be earned for both HUM 510 and HUM 610. (2) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). (3) This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 510-75 MW 05:30pm–06:45pm N. Polzer
Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 610-75. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 512-01 Buddhist Kings and Future Buddhas MW 02:00pm–03:15pm P. Pranke

This course is a survey of Buddhist statecraft, political theory, and governmental and religious institutions from ancient through modern times and across several South and Southeast Asian civilizations. The purpose of this exercise is to gain an understanding of how Buddhism was both shaped by and helped shape the diverse social and political environments in which it flourished.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 612-01. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both HUM 514 and HUM 614.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 514-01 The Middle East in Literature & Film TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm R. Omer-Sherman

This class draws on a range of exciting literary narratives and film documentaries (as well as a few exemplars of fictional Israeli cinema) to discuss the relationship between the Zionist dream of Homeland and the dispossession or Nakba of the Palestinians. We will consider portrayals of the marginal figure of the Arab, both as perceived external threat and as the “Other” within Israeli society as well as works written by Palestinians and Arab citizens of Israel. The core question we will address concerns the writer’s empathic response to the plight of Palestinians and the Arab minority within Israel itself, including the Palestinian people’s demands for justice and liberation from Occupation. Other dynamics to be examined will include: the influence of the literary imagination on Israeli and Palestinian society; the role of dissent and protest. Whenever apt, the instructor will also create opportunities for students to participate in a lively dialogue about current news headlines and important cultural and political trends in Israel, Palestine, and the Middle East, as they develop. Graded assignments include written essays and occasional writing prompts in class.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 614-01. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both HUM 515 and HUM 615.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 515-01 Christian Sexualities Th 04:00pm–06:45pm K. Kleinkopf

Are Sexually Transmitted Infections signs of demonic possession? What is the correct way to enjoy sexual union with God? What does the portrayal of Jesus’ wound as vagina reveal about their gender identity? While these questions may seem blasphemous, they constitute real concerns of various groups of Orthodox Christians across the globe. As you will learn, the expression of gender and sexuality in Christianity expands well beyond our limited modern, Western understanding. Join us as we delve into gender-bending poetry, the spiritual ecstasy of divine lactation, and the resistance of non-monogamous and non-binary cultures to Protestant and Catholic colonialism. This course will explore practices, theology, and scriptural interpretation across cultures, economic groups, historical contexts, and denominational barriers. Come ready to expand your views and investigate a wealth of Christian traditions that will make you question the very categories you take for granted.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 615-01, WGST 593-01, and WGST 692-01. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 562-01 Aesthetics M 04:00pm–06:45pm A. Angermann

This course explores philosophical thinking about art, beauty, experience, and creation. It discusses diverse philosophical ideas and arguments on aesthetic perception, aesthetic judgment, and aesthetic authenticity, as well as social and political aesthetics. By analyzing central texts in philosophical aesthetics, as well as modern and contemporary artworks, we will examine the meaning of art, artworks, and aesthetic experience in everyday life in modern and contemporary society.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 674-01, PHIL 531-01, and PHIL 631-01. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student.

Notes: (1) May be repeated up to three times under different topics. (2) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 590-01 The Hero’s Journey in Literature and Film MWF 09:00am–09:50am M. Johmann

When George Lucas began making the second film in the first Star Wars trilogy, he consulted with famed myth-critic Joseph Campbell, who advised Lucas on what has become known as “the hero journey.” Heroes, in other words, are not born—they are made. They often start out as very ordinary people living very ordinary lives, and more often than not, they aren’t the kind of people who go about looking for adventures. They certainly don’t think of themselves as heroes. But as Campbell demonstrates, it’s the ordinary person who often becomes the hero in adventures ranging from fairy tales to epic literature. We can see it in some of the oldest works of ancient peoples and in modern stories such as Harry Potter, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and, of course, Star Wars. Heroes don’t have to be male or white either. Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz fits the bill perfectly, as does the life of Frederick Douglass. This course will explore a variety of hero journeys, told in literature and film. We’ll examine the stories themselves, the time of their making, along with the history and cultural context, and ask why such stories, told in so many different ways in so many different eras, can have such similar plotlines in so many important ways. If Campbell is right, the answer is that while cultures change, humans remain largely the same. Whoever we are, whenever and wherever we live, we all ask the same questions of the world around us. Stories of “the hero journey” tell who we are and lay out the road of adventure we ourselves are on. Campbell would say that college itself is part of the hero journey you’re on right now. Why not take a class that puts your own hero journey into focus?

HUM 590-02 Introduction to Public Humanities W 04:00pm–06:45pm F. Jamison

Introductory course in Public Humanities critically exploring notions of the individual, freedom, community, and public engagement.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 636-01 and HIST 504-01. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student. (3) This section requires permission of the instructor.
HUM 590-03 Egypt in the Western Imagination M 04:00pm–06:45pm J. Westerfeld

This course explores the representation of ancient Egypt from classical Greece to modern Hollywood.

Note: Co-listed with HIST 550-75 and HIST 650-75.

The study of major systematic views of the development on Western culture.

Prerequisite: Completion of 75 undergraduate hours.

Notes: (1) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). (2) Credit may not be received for this course and HIST 595.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 595-01 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm M. Johmann

A survey of major theories and methodologies in the academic study of religion from a historical perspective.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both HUM 510 and HUM 610.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 610-75 MW 05:30pm–06:45pm N. Polzer
Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 510-75. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 612-01 Buddhist Kings and Future Buddhas MW 02:00pm–03:15pm P. Pranke

This course is a survey of Buddhist statecraft, political theory, and governmental and religious institutions from ancient through modern times and across several South and Southeast Asian civilizations. The purpose of this exercise is to gain an understanding of how Buddhism was both shaped by and helped shape the diverse social and political environments in which it flourished.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 512-01. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both HUM 514 and HUM 614.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 614-01 The Middle East in Literature & Film TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm R. Omer-Sherman

This class draws on a range of exciting literary narratives and film documentaries (as well as a few exemplars of fictional Israeli cinema) to discuss the relationship between the Zionist dream of Homeland and the dispossession or Nakba of the Palestinians. We will consider portrayals of the marginal figure of the Arab, both as perceived external threat and as the “Other” within Israeli society as well as works written by Palestinians and Arab citizens of Israel. The core question we will address concerns the writer’s empathic response to the plight of Palestinians and the Arab minority within Israel itself, including the Palestinian people’s demands for justice and liberation from Occupation. Other dynamics to be examined will include: the influence of the literary imagination on Israeli and Palestinian society; the role of dissent and protest. Whenever apt, the instructor will also create opportunities for students to participate in a lively dialogue about current news headlines and important cultural and political trends in Israel, Palestine, and the Middle East, as they develop. Graded assignments include written essays and occasional writing prompts in class.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 514-01. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both HUM 515 and HUM 615.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 615-01 Christian Sexualities Th 04:00pm–06:45pm K. Kleinkopf

Are Sexually Transmitted Infections signs of demonic possession? What is the correct way to enjoy sexual union with God? What does the portrayal of Jesus’ wound as vagina reveal about their gender identity? While these questions may seem blasphemous, they constitute real concerns of various groups of Orthodox Christians across the globe. As you will learn, the expression of gender and sexuality in Christianity expands well beyond our limited modern, Western understanding. Join us as we delve into gender-bending poetry, the spiritual ecstasy of divine lactation, and the resistance of non-monogamous and non-binary cultures to Protestant and Catholic colonialism. This course will explore practices, theology, and scriptural interpretation across cultures, economic groups, historical contexts, and denominational barriers. Come ready to expand your views and investigate a wealth of Christian traditions that will make you question the very categories you take for granted.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 515-01, WGST 593-01, and WGST 692-01. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student.

Introductory course in Public Humanities critically exploring notions of the individual, freedom, community, and public engagement. Required for MA concentration in Humanities and Public Humanities.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Note: This course includes Community-Based Learning (CBL). Students will engage in a community experience or project with an external partner in order to enhance understanding and application of academic content.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 636-01 W 04:00pm–06:45pm F. Jamison
Note: Co-listed with HUM 590-02 and HIST 504-01.

Introduction to interdisciplinary critical analysis of the arts and humanities in their historical context, providing a foundation for close examination of individual works representative of specific periods.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 662-01 T 04:00pm–06:45pm J. Gibson
J. Segal

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 674-01 Aesthetics M 04:00pm–06:45pm A. Angermann

This course explores philosophical thinking about art, beauty, experience, and creation. It discusses diverse philosophical ideas and arguments on aesthetic perception, aesthetic judgment, and aesthetic authenticity, as well as social and political aesthetics. By analyzing central texts in philosophical aesthetics, as well as modern and contemporary artworks, we will examine the meaning of art, artworks, and aesthetic experience in everyday life in modern and contemporary society.

Notes: (1) Co-listed with HUM 562-01, PHIL 531-01, and PHIL 631-01. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student.

Linguistics Courses

Introduction to the basic assumptions, methods, and concepts of studying language, focusing on the way language influences human experience and the organization of human behavior. Examines the nature, structure, and use of language. May apply as elective in either Social Sciences or Humanities, meeting divisional or out-of-divisional requirements.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 105.

Note: Students with credit for LING 518/ENGL 518 may not take this course.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 325-01 MWF 11:00am–11:50am T. Stewart
Note: Cross-listed with ENGL 325-01.
LING 325-02 MWF 10:00am–10:50am T. Stewart
Note: Cross-listed with ENGL 325-02.

Philosophical problems concerning language, such as meaning, use reference, private language, and their interrelation.

Prerequisite: LING 325 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 341-01 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm G. Dove
Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 341-01.

A historical study of phonological, morphological, and semantic changes in language through the comparative method and internal reconstruction; recent trends in diachronic linguistics.

Prerequisite: LING 325 or LING 327, or graduate standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 506-01 MW 04:00pm–05:15pm T. Stewart
Notes: (1) Cross-listed with LING 606-01. (2) Register for this section if you are an undergraduate student.

Examination of the structure of modern English language; emphasis on grammatical terminology and systems of classification. Students collect and analyze linguistic examples, spoken and written. Recommended for prospective English teachers.

Prerequisite: Junior standing; ENGL 102 or ENGL 105.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 522-02 MW 02:00pm–03:15pm T. Stewart
Note: Cross-listed with ENGL 522-02.

Psychological aspects of language and their significance for analysis and understanding of cognitive and social processes.

Prerequisite: PSYC 307 or ENGL 325 or LING 325 or LING 518.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 524-01 TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm M. Kondaurova
Note: Cross-listed with PSYC 524-01 and PSYC 609-02.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
LING 590-01 Endangered Languages Th 04:00pm–06:45pm H. Cruz

Linguistic diversity around the world is shrinking rapidly as many languages become moribund or cease to be spoken altogether. Groups around the world have begun multifaceted efforts to maintain, revive, and promote the use of many of these languages. In this course we examine the phenomena of language endangerment and language revitalization. We will evaluate the socio-historical reasons for language shift, the rationale for language revitalization and the relative degrees of success in different revitalization programs.

A historical study of phonological, morphological, and semantic changes in language through the comparative method and internal reconstruction; recent trends in diachronic linguistics.

Prerequisite: LING 325 or LING 327, or graduate standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 606-01 MW 04:00pm–05:15pm T. Stewart
Notes: (1) Cross-listed with LING 506-01. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student.

Introduction to the study of language and speaking as part of daily social life, viewed from an ethnographic perspective.

Prerequisite: LING 325 or LING 327 or graduate standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 630-01 T 04:00pm–06:45pm K. Swinehart
Notes: (1) Co-listed with ANTH 662-01. (2) Register for this section if you are a graduate student.