You are here: Home Ph.D Program in Humanities

Doctorate of Philosophy in the Humanities

INFORMATION UPDATE: MARCH 2014

 

 

 

PHD PROGRAM IN HUMANITIES

 

 

Welcome to the PhD Program in Humanities.

 

Our program has recently been redesigned.  Below, please see our all-new offerings, admissions information, and program requirements for the academic year 2014-15 onward.

 

 

ABOUT OUR PROGRAM

 

Students in the Humanities PhD Program design individual, interdisciplinary courses of study.

 

The program is grounded in both historical and global perspectives on thought, the arts, and culture.

 

Our students work with a choice of over 135 notable scholars, artists, and writers across the Humanities, as well as in the Social Sciences and Sciences, Law, Medicine, Technology, and more.

 

In addition, our program is tied to institutions and organizations throughout the community, across the nation, and around the world.

 

 

PROGRAM OPTIONS

 

The program currently offers two specialization options:

 

Culture, Criticism, and Contemporary Thought (C3T): for scholars

   oriented toward the academy, museums, and other institutions and   

   organizations employing doctoral degree recipients.

 

Public Arts and Letters (PAL):  for artists and writers across fields wishing to

   produce works of literature, art, music, opera, performance, film, and more that

   is deeply grounded in and informed by intensive scholarship.

 

Potential options in Medical Humanities and Global Adaptation and

   Translation are envisioned for the future.

FULL- AND PART-TIME SCHEDULE OPTIONS

 

The full-time study option is targeted to four years, with lighter requirements during summer.  The part-time program, targeted to six years, serves busy professionals and those with other vital obligations.  Sample schedules are provided below.

 

 

PROGRAM ADMISSION, COSTS, AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

 

Application instructions:

 

1.   Admission to the Humanities PhD program is exclusively for the fall semester of each academic year.

 

2.   All materials must be received by January 15th for the following fall.  No late applications will be accepted.

 

3.  All applicants must have completed an appropriate Master's degree (M.A., M.F.A., M.Div, or other) prior to beginning the program.

 

4.  All applicants must also have fulfilled all requirements of the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies (SIGS).

 

5.  Required are:

a) The SIGS application.

b) A statement of intent (750-1000 words) detailing educational and future

     professional goals;

c) A current academic curriculum vitae;

d) A scholarly or creative writing sample (scholarly, fiction, creative     

     nonfiction: 5000-10,000 words; for length guidelines in other genres,

     please contact the PhD Program Administrator).

e) Official transcripts of all undergraduate- and graduate-level work.

f) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores;

g) If applicable, proof of English proficiency;

h) Three letters of recommendation from former instructors attesting to

     capability for doctoral-level work; and:

i) $60 application fee, paid to SIGS.

 

6.  For information on costs, financial aid, loans, other assistance, state residency, housing, and graduate life at the university, please see the SIGS website.

 

7.  For information on further options for financial assistance administered by the PhD Program, please see “Graduate Teaching Assistantships and Fellowships,” below.

 

8.  For any further questions regarding specifics of the Humanities PhD Program application, please e-mail the PhD Program Administrator.

 

 

TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS

 

The PhD program offers a limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships (GTAships) to full-time students.  These are open to both incoming and ongoing students. 

 

GTAships entitle students to receive tuition remission for the full-time courseload of 24 credit per year, including summer.  GTAships require students to teach five undergraduate courses each year of up to 35 students each.

 

GTAships are subject to yearly renewal at the discretion of the program, on the basis of program needs, student progress toward the degree, and classroom performance, as determined through faculty teaching observation and student evaluations.

 

To apply for a GTAship, please complete the GTAship Application, which is separate from the application for admission, and return it directly by e-mail to the PhD Program Administrator (not SIGS) by January 15th.

 

Undergraduate teaching is occasionally available for selected graduate students at part-time teaching rates.  Inquiries may be made by e-mail to the PhD Program Administrator.

 

In addition, a very limited number of fellowships may be awarded to incoming full-time students at the discretion of the program.  Admitted applicants eligible for such fellowships will be notified.

 

Neither GTAs nor Fellows are permitted to hold any employment at or beyond the university.  Outside employment constitutes grounds for dismissal both from the GTAship or Fellowship and from the PhD program itself.

 

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

 

CURRICULUM:

 

I.  Core Coursework, All Students:

 

     A.  Foundations:

               1.  Hum 660:  Proseminar: Introduction to Doctoral Study, 3 credits

               2.  Hum 661:  Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture I, 3 credits

               3.  Hum 662:  Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture II, 3 credits

               4.  Hum 663:  Global Perspectives on the Arts and Culture, 3 credits

 

     B.  Theories and Methodologies:

               1.  Hum 673:  Topics in Cultural Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

               2.  Hum 674: Topics in Aesthetic Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

 

     C.  Institutional, Educational, or Community Internship

               Hum 650: Doctoral Internship, 3 credits

 

     D.  Directed Study

               1.  Hum 651:  Directed Study Project I, 3 credits

               2.  Hum 652:  Directed Study Project II, 3 credits

 

II.  Additional Coursework, by Specialization:

 

      A.  Culture, Criticism, and Contemporary Thought (C3T)

                Approved C3T scholarly courses, minimum 12 credits

 

      B.  Public Arts and Letters (PAL)

                Approved PAL workshop courses, minimum 12 credits

 

III.  Foreign Language Requirement, All Students:

 

      Basic proficiency in two classical and/or modern languages, or advanced proficiency

      in one, in addition to English.  Please see details below.

 

 

IV.  Comprehensive Examination, All Students

 

      Please see details below.

 

 

V.   Dissertation Prospectus, Writing and Defense, All Students

 

      Please see details below.

 

TOTAL MINIMUM NUMBER OF CREDITS REQUIRED: 48 (16 courses).

 

It is strongly recommended that students orient completion of specialization coursework toward a specific discipline, and supplement required coursework with elective courses in that discipline.

 

 

REQUIRED PROGRAM COMPLETION SCHEDULE

FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

FIRST YEAR

 

 

 

Fall:

Hum 660:  Proseminar: Introduction to Doctoral Study, 3 credits

Hum 661:   Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture I, 3 credits

Course toward C3T or PAL Specialization and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Spring:

Hum 662:  Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture II, 3 credits

Hum 663:  Global Perspectives on the Arts and Culture, 3 credits

Course toward C3T or PAL Specialization and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Summer:

Hum 650: Doctoral Internship, 3 credits

Hum 651:  Directed Study Project I (Book Review Project), 3 credits

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

 

SECOND YEAR

 

Fall:

Hum 673:  Topics in Cultural Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

and/or

Hum 674:  Topics in Aesthetic Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

Course(s) toward C3T or PAL Track and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

All Spring:

Hum 673:  Topics in Cultural Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

and/or

Hum 674:  Topics in Aesthetic Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

Course(s) toward C3T or PAL Track and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Late Spring:

Formation of Dissertation Committee

Preliminary Draft of Dissertation Prospectus

Compilation of Comprehensive Exam Reading List

 

Summer:

Hum 652:  Directed Study Project II (Article Project), 3 credits

Further Drafts of Dissertation Prospectus

Study based on Comprehensive Exam Reading List

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

 

THIRD YEAR

 

All Fall:

Hum 689: Reading for Comprehensive Exam, 9 credits 

Further Drafts of Dissertation Prospectus 

Study based on Comprehensive Exam Reading List

Additionally, if applicable: final study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Late Fall:

Final Draft of Dissertation Prospectus

Completion of study based on Comprehensive Exam Reading List

Completion of Foreign Language requirement

Comprehensive Exam

 

Spring:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

Dissertation Writing

 

Summer:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

Dissertation Writing

 

 

FOURTH YEAR

 

Fall:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

Dissertation Writing

 

All Spring:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

 

Early Spring:

Dissertation Completion

                        

Late Spring:

Dissertation Submission and Defense

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM COMPLETION SCHEDULE

FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS

 

 

FIRST YEAR:

 

Fall:

Hum 660:  Proseminar: Introduction to Doctoral Study, 3 credits

Hum 661:  Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture I, 3 credits

or, if work or other schedule prohibits the courses above:

Course toward C3T or PAL Specialization and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Spring:

Hum 662:  Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture II, 3 credits

Hum 663:  Global Perspectives on the Arts and Culture, 3 credits

or, if work or other schedule prohibits the courses above:

Course toward C3T or PAL Specialization and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Summer:

Hum 650: Doctoral Internship, 3 credits

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

 

SECOND YEAR:

 

Fall:

Hum 660:  Proseminar: Introduction to Doctoral Study, 3 credits

Hum 661:  Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture I, 3 credits

            or, if Hum 660 and Hum 661 have been completed:

Course toward C3T or PAL Specialization and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Spring:

Hum 662:  Historical Perspectives on the Arts and Culture II, 3 credits

Hum 663:  Global Perspectives on the Arts and Culture, 3 credits

or, if Hum 662 and Hum 663 have been completed:

Course toward C3T or PAL Specialization and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Summer:

Hum 651:  Directed Study I (Book Review Project), 3 credits

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

 

THIRD YEAR:

 

Fall:

Hum 673:  Topics in Cultural Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

and/or

Hum 674:  Topics in Aesthetic Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

Course(s) toward C3T or PAL Track and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Spring:

Hum 673:  Topics in Cultural Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

and/or

Hum 674:  Topics in Aesthetic Theory or approved substitute, 3 credits

Course(s) toward C3T or PAL Track and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Summer:

Hum 652:  Directed Study II (Article Project), 3 credits

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

 

FOURTH YEAR:

 

Fall:

Courses toward C3T or PAL Track and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

All Spring:

Courses toward C3T or PAL Track and/or Disciplinary Electives

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Late Spring:

Formation of Dissertation Committee

Preliminary Draft of Dissertation Prospectus

Compilation of Comprehensive Exam Reading List

 

Summer:

Hum 652:  Directed Study Project II (Article Project), 3 credits

Further Drafts of Dissertation Prospectus

Study based on Comprehensive Exam Reading List

Additionally, if applicable: study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

 

FIFTH YEAR:

 

All Fall:

Hum 689: Reading for Comprehensive Exam, 9 credits   

Additionally, if applicable: final study toward Foreign Language requirement

 

Early through Mid-Fall:

Completion of Dissertation Prospectus

 

Late Fall:

Completion of Foreign Language requirement

Comprehensive Exam

 

Spring:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

Dissertation Writing

 

Summer:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

Dissertation Writing

 

 

SIXTH YEAR:

 

Fall:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

Dissertation Writing

 

All Spring:

Doct 600: Doctoral Candidacy, 2 credits

 

Early Spring:

Dissertation Completion

                        

Late Spring:

Dissertation Submission and Defense

 

 

 

PART-TIME STUDENT PROGRAM PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENT:

 

All students with part-time status must additionally participate in the program community through attendance at two approved events each semester.  Approved events may include Association of Humanities Academics (AHA) forums, faculty lectures, and guest lectures, some of which are held in the evening for part-time student convenience.  Students will be informed by e-mail of such events as they arise.  Students seeking credit for events not listed by the program may email the PhD Program Administrator with details.

 

 

 

INTERNSHIP REQUIREMENT

 

A list of institutional and community partner organizations, along with Internship Guidelines and Proposal forms, are available on the program website.  The Internship Proposal form must be completed at least 30 days in advance of a projected placement.

 

A student teaching at the college or university level, at UofL or elsewhere, may substitute the teaching for the internship through successful acceptance of a letter written by the teaching supervisor at the close of the teaching period evaluating the student's performance.  However, the student must then enroll in another three-credit course within the program to replace the internship credit.

 

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

 

Choice of foreign language(s) is to be determined, for each student, in the first year of study in consultation with the PhD Program Director along with consulting faculty in the student's projected fields.

 

Before a student may advance to doctoral candidacy and begin the dissertation, s/he must demonstrate either a) proficiency in two classical and/or modern languages; or b) advanced proficiency in classical or modern language, in addition to English.

 

Proficiency in a foreign language may be demonstrated through one of the following methods:

 

a)  Successful acceptance by the program of a transcript from another institution verifying that proficiency in the relevant language has been attained.

 

b) Completion of an approved 300-level course at the university taught entirely in the relevant language, with a grade of B+ or higher.

 

c)  Completion of the course Hum 640: Reading Knowledge for training in and/or review of the relevant language(s) with a grade of B+ or higher.

 

d)  Successful completion of the Foreign Language Proficiency Examination in the relevant language.  The exam may be taken through the Department of English or, in special cases through Humanities, for a fee.  Please see the English Graduate Program Calendar to determine whether the relevant language exam is offered.  If it is not offered, please email the PhD Program Administrator.

 

Advanced proficiency in a foreign language may be demonstrated through one of the following methods:

 

a) Acceptance by the PhD Program Director of a transcript from another

     institution verifying that advanced proficiency in the relevant language has

     been attained.

 

b)  Completion of an approved 500- or 600-level course at the university

      taught entirely in the relevant language, with a grade of B+ or higher.

 

c)  Successful completion of the Foreign Language Advanced Proficiency

     Examination in the relevant language.  The examination may be taken

     through Humanities for a fee.  For more information, please email

     the PhD Program Administrator.

 

 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES

 

The Independent Study Application is available in the Ph.D. office.

 

The proposal must demonstrate that: a) the study will not duplicate any extant graduate course; b) the study is essential to the future dissertation; c) the study will be guided by a faculty member with expertise in the area of inquiry.

 

Any Independent Study must be approved by the program before the student may register.

 

 

DOCTORAL COMMITTEE

 

As the student nears completion if his/her coursework, s/he, working with the PhD Program Director, forms a doctoral committee comprised of one Committee Chair and a minimum of two other faculty members. 

 

All proposed committees must be approved by the Program Director.

 

 

 

DISSERTATION PROSPECTUS

 

Once the Doctoral Committee is established, the student, working with members of the committee, begins to draft the Dissertation Prospectus.

 

The prospectus is a document of approximately 6,000 to 8,000 words, in addition to a substantial bibliography, that functions as a blueprint for the dissertation itself.  While the dissertation project may change slightly over time, it is expected that the final version will hew, overall, to the prospectus plan. 

 

A sample standard prospectus, for reference, may be obtained from the

PhD Program Administrator.

 

The prospectus must be approved by all members of the committee before the student can proceed to the Comprehensive Exam.  Any later changes to the plan must be approved by the committee.

 

The C3T Dissertation Prospectus must include:

a)  Detailed discussion of the central topic to be approached in the dissertation,

      including the main argument and sub-arguments to be made, general critical

      perspectives to be engaged, and types of materials to be covered;

b)  A detailed rationale for that topic, explaining why it is important, outlining extant

      critical conversations surrounding the topic, and tracing the student’s original  

      intervention into those conversations;

c)  A detailed survey of published research to date surrounding the topic;

d)  A detailed explanation of how the student’s previous preparation and completed

      work renders the student a suitable scholar to undertake this specific dissertation;

e)  Detailed discussion of each planned chapter of the dissertation, including the

      argument(s) to be made in each, specific critical perspectives and critics’ work to be

      engaged, and specific materials to be covered.

f)  A monthly project completion scheduling contract.

 

These general guidelines are for quick reference, and are to stand only in addition to whatever dictates may be agreed upon in the individual case by the student, Doctoral Committee, and the Program director.

 

The PAL Dissertation Prospectus must include:

 

a)  Detailed discussion of the central topic(s) to be approached in the dissertation

      project, including the genre of the work, the general style of the work, and the

      research basis of the project, including general types of materials to be consulted and

      general critical perspectives to be engaged;

b)  A detailed rationale for that project, explaining why it is important, outlining extant

      critical and artistic conversations surrounding the topic, and tracing the student’s

      original critical and artistic interventions into those conversations;

c)  A detailed survey of published research to date and extant creative work surrounding

      the relevant topic(s);

d)  A detailed explanation of how the student’s previous preparation and completed

      work renders the student a suitable scholar and artist to undertake this specific

      project;

e)  Detailed discussion of each planned section of the project, including the specific

      critical and artistic perspectives and works to be consulted and engaged.

f)  A monthly project completion scheduling contract.

 

These general guidelines are for quick reference, and are to stand only in addition to whatever dictates may be agreed upon in the individual case by the student, Doctoral Committee, and the Program director.

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION READING LIST

 

Once the Doctoral Committee is established, the student, working with members of the committee, compiles the Comprehensive Exam Reading List.  This list may include primary works as well as critical works, in both the student’s general fields and specific Dissertation field. 

 

A typical Reading List might contain approximately between 100 and 150 items.  Such items would not only include whole books, but relevant sections of books, articles, relevant sections of articles, artistic works, etc.

 

The Reading List must be approved by all Doctoral Committee members, as well as the Program Director.

 

The Reading List will typically form much of the core of the Dissertation Bibliography.

 

These general guidelines are for quick reference, and are to stand only in addition to whatever dictates may be agreed upon in the individual case by the student, Doctoral Committee, and the Program director.

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

 

The Comprehensive Examination is a one-time, take-home, open-book, essay exam administered via e-mail by the PhD Program Administrator for a period of 72 hours.

 

The exam consists of one question -- singular or multipartite – or set of questions from each member of the committee, to be submitted in advance of the exam to the Committee Chair and PhD Program Director for approval.  In a case in which there are more than three committee members, the total question length will be adjusted accordingly. 

 

Each committee member will grade his/her section of the exam pass/fail.  The student must pass all sections of the exam.

 

If a student fails one or more portions of the exam, s/he may retake the portion(s) once, with alternate questions, within a 90-day period.  Failure to pass the re-take(s) will result in dismissal from the program.

 

 

ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY STATUS

 

The status of PhD Candidacy is conferred at the beginning of the first semester following successful completion of the Comprehensive Exam.  University enrollment fees are significantly reduced from that time forward.  Thus timely advancement is strongly recommended.

 

 

DISSERTATION

 

C3T Dissertation:  the scholarly dissertation is a written work of approximately 45,000 to 75,000 words.  It typically includes four or five chapters, in addition to an introduction.  Each chapter should involve distinctly different sub-arguments and materials that, in different ways, advance the dissertation’s central argument overall. 

 

PAL Dissertation Project:  the form of the artistic dissertation project may be determined by the student and the Doctoral Committee, in conjunction with the Program Director.  It is generally expected that the artistic project is to be accompanied by a substantial written document demonstrating deep scholarly proficiency and influence as well as artistic accomplishment. 

 

These general guidelines are for quick reference, and are to stand only in addition to whatever dictates may be agreed upon in the individual case by the student, Doctoral Committee, and the Program director.

 

The required course Hum 660 includes discussion of the dissertation.  In addition, yearly workshops on the dissertation will be provided by the program.

 

The student must submit each portion of the dissertation draft to Doctoral Committee members as scheduled.  The final draft of the dissertation must be submitted to all Committee members, and to the PhD Program Director, a minimum of 30 days before the deadline for Committee approval.

 

 

DISSERTATION DEFENSE

 

The Dissertation Defense is a one-hour discussion of the completed dissertation with Committee members.   The defense is an event open to the university and public communities.  In selected cases in which participation in the defense would occasion unusually high travel expenses, the defense may be completed via internet conference.

 

 

PROGRAM STANDING AND PROGRESS

 

Satisfactory standing in the program entails: a) regular enrollment in graduate courses, as determined for full- or part-time student status; b) timely satisfaction of all course and program requirements; c) maintenance of a minimum 3.0 gradepoint average; d) earning of no grade in any course lower than B; and e) standard professional deportment within the program and university communities.

 

Any course grade of I (Incomplete) or X (Deferred Completion) must be replaced by a grade of A through B within the semester following the course.  If it is not, it will revert to a grade of F, constitution violation of program standing policies.

 

The maximum program enrollment period for full-time students beginning the PhD program in the academic year 2014-15 or later is 3 years leading to Candidacy and 3 years following Advancement to Candidacy.  Potential exceptions may be processed via approved petition to the Program Director, submitted via e-mail to the PhD Program Administrator.

 

The maximum program enrollment period for part-time students beginning the PhD program in the academic year 2014-15 or later is 5 years leading to Candidacy and 4 years following Advancement to Candidacy.  Potential exceptions may be processed via petition to the Program Director, submitted via e-mail to the PhD Program Administrator.

 

Full- and part-time students beginning the PhD program previous to the academic year 2014-15 are subject solely to the general SIGS requirement that enrollment following Advancement to Candidacy not exceed 4 years.  However, such students are encouraged to follow the enrollment requirements above in order to enhance their professional standing and reduce their education costs.

In exceptional cases, that enrollment period may be extended by the PhD Program Director and/or SIGS Dean.

 

Failure to meet any condition of program standing or progress will be cause for review of the student's record by the Ph.D. Program Director and Steering Committee, potential placement of the student for one semester on Probationary Status, and potential subsequent dismissal from the program.

 

 

TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDIT

 

Students may be permitted to transfer up to 6 credits of comparable graduate coursework, taken within three years of entry into the PhD program, from other institutions.  Transfer credit may be only attempted after program admission.  The credit transfer petition must include detailed description of the course(s) for which credit is desired, course syllabus or syllabi, and a transcript.  For further requirements, please see the SIGS website.

 

 

GRADUATION

 

Students must complete all requirements for graduation as outlined on the SIGS website.   The Degree Application is available via Ulink.

 

 

NON-DEGREE STUDENT STATUS

 

Non-enrolled students may take certain courses in the PhD program by permission of the program.  Please direct any inquiries by e-mail to the

PhD Program Administrator.

 

Completion of PhD courses by non-degree students does not guarantee admission to the program.  For those admitted to the program, only 6 credits can be transferred.

 

Information on application for non-degree status is on the SIGS website.

 

 

Humanities PhD Program Faculty and Staff

 

 

Director:

 

S.I. Salamensky

Professor, Global Humanities

 

 

Administrator:

 

Lisa Schonburg

Administrative Specialist

 

 

 

Steering Committee:

 

Annette Allen

Director, Beijing Foreign Studies Program
Professor, Humanities

 

Pamela Beattie

Director of Undergraduate Studies, Humanities

Assistant Professor, Humanities

 

Simona Bertacco 

Director, Humanities Ph.D. Student Advisement

Assistant Professor, Humanities

 

Mark E. Blum

Professor, History

 

Thomas B. Byers

Director, Commonwealth Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Professor, English

 

Ying Kit Chan

Director, Hite Art Institute

Professor, Art

 

John Gibson

Associate Professor, Philosophy

 

Aaron Jaffe

Professor, English

 

Dismas Masolo 
Distinguished University Scholar

Professor, Pan-African Studies, Philosophy

 

Patrick Pranke

Assistant Professor, Humanities, Religious Studies

 

Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Assistant Professor, Humanities, Linguistics

 

Elaine O. Wise
Chair of Humanities Division

Assistant Professor, English, Humanities

 

 

 

Associated Faculty:

 

Ann T. Allen

Professor, History

 

David Anderson

Associate Professor, English

 

Blake Beattie

Associate Professor, History

 

John Begley

Assistant Professor, Art

 

Latrica Best

Assistant Professor, Pan-African Studies

 

S. Matthew Biberman

Professor, English

 

Dale B. Billingsley

Professor, English

 

Beth A. Boehm

Interim Dean, School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies

Professor, English

 

Delinda Buie

Professor and Curator, University Libraries Rare Books and Special Collections

 

Terry Burden

Assistant Professor, Term, Humanities, Religious Studies

 

Nefertiti Burton

Associate Dean for International, Diversity, and Outreach Programs

Associate Professor, Theatre

 

Anne I. Caldwell

Associate Professor, Political Science

 

Joy G. Carew

Associate Professor, Pan-African Studies, Linguistics

 

Genevieve Carlton

Assistant Professor, History

 

Mary Carothers

Associate Professor, Art

 

Karen Chandler

Associate Professor, English

 

Jean Christensen

Professor Emerita, Music History

 

Karen Christopher

Associate Professor, Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies

 

Amy Clukey

Assistant Professor, English

 

L. Andrew Cooper

Director, Film Studies Program

Assistant Professor, Humanities, Film

 

Dario Covi

Professor Emeritus, Art

 

Geoffrey A. Cross

Professor, English

 

A. Glenn Crothers

Associate Professor, History

 

John T. Cumbler

Professor, History

 

Matthieu Dalle

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, French

 

Julia Dietrich

Professor, English

 

Robert L. Douglas

Professor Emeritus, Pan-African Studies

 

Guy Dove

Assistant Professor, Term, Philosophy, Neuropsychology

 

Christine Ehrick

Associate Professor, History

 

Andreas Elpidorou

Assistant Professor, Term, Philosophy

 

Bonnie Fonseca-Greber

Assistant Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, French

 

Catherine Fosl

Associate Professor, History, Women’s and Gender Studies

 

Lauren Freeman

Assistant Professor, Philosophy

 

Christopher Fulton

Associate Professor, Art

 

Linda Marie Gigante

Professor Emerita, Art, Archaeology

 

Zhanna Goldentul

Professor, Theater

 

Alan Golding

Professor, English

 

Karen Gray

Assistant Professor, Term, Humanities

 

John Greene

Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, French

 

Susan M. Griffin

Editor, The Henry James Review

Distinguished University Scholar

Professor, English

 

Paul Griner

Professor, Creative Writing, English

 

Karen Hadley

Associate Professor, English

 

Mike Hagan

Assistant Professor, Term, Humanities, Religious Studies

 

Dennis Hall

Professor Emeritus, English

 

Stephen Hanson

Associate Professor, Bioethics, Philosophy

 

Albert Harris

Professor Emeritus, Theater

 

Benjamin T. Harrison

Professor, History

 

Riffat Hassan

Professor Emerita, Humanities, Religious Studies

 

Dawn Heinecken

Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies

 

Suzette Henke

Professor, English

 

Bruce Horner

Professor, English

 

Benjamin Hufbauer

Associate Professor, Art

 

Gregory Hutcheson

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

Susan Jarosi

Associate Professor, Art

 

Michael Johmann

Assistant Professor, Term, Humanities

 

Pearlie Johnson

Assistant Professor, Pan-African Studies

 

Ricky L. Jones

Professor, Pan-African Studies

 

Yvonne Jones

Associate Professor, Pan-African Studies

 

Debra Journet

Professor, English

 

Tracy E. K’Meyer

Professor, History

 

Robert B. Kebric

Professor, History

 

Jongwoo Jeremy Kim

Associate Professor, Art

 

Robert H. Kimball

Associate Professor, Philosophy

 

Avery Kolers

Professor, Philosophy

 

Karen Kopelson

Associate Professor, English

 

Daniel Krebs

Assistant Professor, History

 

Delin Lai

Associate Professor, Art

 

Alan Leidner

Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, German

 

Brian Leung

Director, Creative Writing

Associate Professor, English

 

Min-Zhan Lu

Professor, English

 

Thomas C. Mackey

Professor, History

 

Mary Makris

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

Thomas Maloney

Professor, Philosophy

 

Justin A. McCarthy

Distinguished University Scholar

Professor, History

 

M. Brandon McCormack

Assistant Professor, PAS and Humanities

 

John McLeod

Professor, History

 

Manuel Medina

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

Maryam Moazzen

Assistant Professor, Humanities

 

Peter Morrin

Director, Center for Arts and Culture Partnerships

Associate Professor, Art

 

Sena Jeter Naslund

Writer in Residence, Creative Writing, English

 

Frank Nuessel

Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

David Owen

Associate Professor, Philosophy

 

Elizabeth Patton

Assistant Professor, Term, Humanities, Linguistics

 

Patricia Payette

Executive Director, Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

 

Diane Pecknold

Assistant Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies 

 

Kiki Petrosino

Assistant Professor, Creative Writing, English

 

Wendy Pfeffer

Associate Dean, Graduate Studies

Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, French

 

Natalie Polzer

Assistant Professor, Humanities

 

Nancy N. Potter

Professor, Bioethics, Philosophy

 

Andrew Rabin

Associate Professor, English

 

Theresa Rajack-Talley

Associate Professor, Pan-African Studies

 

Glynis Ridley

Associate Professor, English

 

Mónica Rodriguez

Assistant Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

Regina Roebuck

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

Mary Rosner

Associate Professor, English

 

Susan M. Ryan

Associate Professor, English

 

Stephen Schneider

Assistant Professor, English

 

Mary P. Sheridan

Professor, Digital Media, English

 

Steven Skaggs

Director, Design Program

Professor, Art

 

Jeffrey Skinner

Professor, Creative Writing, English

 

Arthur J. Slavin 
Professor Emeritus, Humanities

 

Yujia Song

Assistant Professor, Term, Philosophy

 

Garry Sparks

Assistant Professor, Humanities

 

Robert St. Clair

Research Associate, Institute for Democracy and Development

Professor, Communications

 

Hristomir Stanev

Assistant Professor, English

 

Amy Steiger

Assistant Professor, Theatre

 

Mary Ann Stenger 

Professor Emerita, Humanities

 

Thomas Stewart

Assistant Professor, Term, Humanities

 

Kaila Story

Associate Professor, Pan-African Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies

 

Clare Sullivan

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

Nancy M. Theriot

Professor, American Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies

 

Lundeana Thomas

Professor, Theatre

 

W.S. Tkweme

Assistant Professor, Pan-African Studies

 

Russell Vandenbroucke

Professor, Theatre Arts

 

Daniel Vivian

Assistant Professor, History

 

Lisa Wagner

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Spanish

 

Mónica Ann Walker Vadillo

Assistant Professor, Term, Art

 

Lee Shai Weissbach

Professor, History

 

Osborne P. Wiggins

Professor Emeritus, Philosophy

 

Ann Elizabeth Willey

Associate Professor, English

 

Bronwyn Williams

Director, University Writing Center

Professor, English

 

Michael Williams

Assistant Professor, Term, Humanities, Humanities

 

Wendy Yoder

Assistant Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, French

 

Li Zeng

Associate Professor, Classical and Modern Languages, Chinese

 

Document Actions
Personal tools