Alan Golding

Professor
Email: alan.golding @ louisville.edu
Phone:502-852-5918
Office Hours: Fall Term: N/A

 

Courses Taught

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Extensive practice in literary analysis and in the forms and conventions of writing about various literary genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. A survey of American writers. Historical period: 1700-1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. A survey of American writers. Historical period: post 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. A study of major poets, British and American, from Hopkins to Stevens. Historical period: post 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105, membership in English Honors Program. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Two seminars required of all students within the departmental honors program.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 300 or 310. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Formerly ENGL-321; credit may not be earned for this course by students with credit for ENGL-321. Study of selected works, in a variety of genres, from 1910 to 1960. Taught with attention to historical and cultural context. Historical period: post 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 300 or 310. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Formerly ENGL-322; credit may not be earned for this course by students with credit for ENGL-322. Study of selected works, in a variety of genres, from 1960 to the present day. Taught with attention to historical and cultural context. Historical period: post 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 300 or 310. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). An intensive study in the works of one or a small grouping of authors. May be repeated once for credit. Historical period varies by semester-see schedule of courses.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; junior standing. Study of the works of a selected writer or grouping of writers, in literary, biographical, and/or social context. Historical period: varies by semester-see Schedule of Courses
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; junior standing. In-depth study of selected movements, genres, topics or groupings of writers from 1960 to present. Historical period: post-1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 310; junior standing. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). In-depth analysis of and intensive writing about a focused area of study within the discipline of English.
A survey or intensive sampling of contemporary poetry.

Educational Background

    M.A., Ph.D. University of Chicago

      Teaching Areas

        Teaching interests include American poetry, modern and contemporary American literature, history and theory of the avant-garde, poetry and politics.

          Research Interests

            Current book projects:

              • (1)"Isn't the avant-garde always pedagogical": Experimental Poetics and/as Pedagogy;
              • (2) Writing Into the Future: From THE DIAL to the Digital (selected essays on the history and reception of experimental American poetics).

              Professional Activities


              Co-editor, Iowa Series on Contemporary North American Poetry (U of Iowa P).
              Editorial boards of Contemporary Literature, Twentieth-Century Literature
              Advisory board of the U of Alabama Press series on Modern and Contemporary Poetics.

              Select Publications

              Book
              From Outlaw to Classic: Canons in American Poetry (U of Wisconsin P,
              1995; reprinted 1998).

              Articles and Book Chapters
              “From Pound to Olson: The Avant-Gardist as Pedagogue.” Ezra Pound and Education, ed. Michael Coyle and Steven Yao. (National Poetry Foundation, forthcoming 2008).

              “The Dial, The Little Review, and the Dialogics of Modernism.”Little Magazines and Modernism: New Approaches. Ed. Suzanne Churchill and Adam McKible. (Ashgate Press, 2007). 65-81.

              “Language Writing, Digital Poetics, and Transitional Materialities.” In New Media Poetics: Contexts, Technotexts, and Theories. Ed. Adalaide Morris and Thomas Swiss (MIT Press, 2006). 249-84.

              “‘Isn’t the avant-garde always pedagogical’: Experimental Poetics and/as Pedagogy.” In Poetry and Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary. Ed. Juliana Spahr and Joan Retallack. (Palgrave / St. Martin’s, 2006.)

              "American Poet-teachers and the Academy," in A Concise Companion to Twentieth-Century American Poetry. Ed. Stephen Fredman. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2005. 55-74.

              "'What about all this writing?': Williams and Alternative Poetics," Textual Practice 18.2 (2004): 65-82.

              "Authority, Marginality, England, and Ireland in the Work of Susan Howe." In Something We Have That They Don't: British and American Poetic Relations Since 1925. Ed. Steve Clark and Mark Ford. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 2004. 168-81.

              "Recent American Poetry Anthologies and the Idea of the 'Mainstream.' In Poetry and Contemporary Culture: The Question of Value. Ed. Jonathan Allison and Andrew Roberts. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2002. 123-40.

              "'Drawings with Words': Susan Howe's Visual Poetics." In "We Who 'Love To Be Astonished'": Experimental Feminist Poetics and Performance Art. Ed. Laura Hinton and Cynthia Hogue. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2001. 152-64.