Paul R. Clark, PhD, RN, MA

Paul R. Clark, Phd, RN, MA

Paul R. Clark, PhD, RN, MA

Assistant Professor
prclar01@louisville.edu
502.852.7405

Paul Clark is the graduate of an accelerated BSN program.  Following graduation he worked as an RN in the post-operative medical surgical and adult Emergency Department care settings.  After completing graduate school, Clark joined the faculty at the UofL School of Nursing where he teaches pharmacology  and Foundations for Professional Nursing Practice.  He stays active in Emergency Nursing through research in the emergency care setting and as an advisory board member of the Emergency Nursing Research Advisory Council, the research arm of the Emergency Nurses Association.  Besides his full time work with the UofL School of Nursing, Dr. Clark is a System Educator for the Institute for Nursing in the Norton Healthcare System (Louisville, KY).

Paul Clark holds a PhD in nursing (2010) as well as Masters degrees in nursing (2006) and theology (1997).  He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Louisville School of Nursing and a System Educator for Norton Healthcare (both in Louisville, KY).  Paul’s research focus centers on Health Services Research, improving the safety and quality of in-patient care.  He partners with bedside & stretcherside nurses in projects such as developing a critical incident debriefing process with pediatric nurses and improving perinatal loss care.  Outside of healthcare, Paul is a Franciscan Brother in the Roman Catholic Conventual Franciscan Religious Order (Province of Our Lady of Consolation).  He enjoys home brewing dark ales and lighter, smoked honey ales.


Paul Clark is the graduate of an accelerated BSN program, and following graduation he worked as an RN both on a post-operative medical surgical unit and then in an adult Emergency Department.  After completing grad school, Clark joined the faculty at the UofL School of Nursing where he teaches Pharmacology and Fundamentals of Nursing Practice while facilitating clinicals for nursing students.  He stays active in Emergency Nursing through research in the Emergency Care setting and as an advisory member of the Emergency Nursing Research Advisory Council, the research arm of the Emergency Nurses Association.  Besides his full time work with the UofL School of Nursing, Dr. Clark is a System Educator for the Institute for Nursing in the Norton Healthcare System (Louisville, KY). 


Paul Clark is the graduate of an accelerated BSN program.  Following graduation he worked as an RN both on a post-operative medical surgical unit and then in an adult Emergency Department.  After completing graduate school, Clark joined the faculty at the University of Louisville School of Nursing where he teaches Pharmacology and Fundamentals for Professional Nursing Practice.  His Health Service Research focus centers on understanding the relationship between resilience, moral distress, and workplace engagement in Emergency Department nurses.  Topics of interest include but are not limited to how resilience practices can mitigate the negative impact of moral distress, as well as how workplace violence and bullying can add to moral distress, workplace disengagement, and burnout.


Paul Clark holds a PhD in nursing (2010) as well as Masters degrees in nursing (2006) and theology (1997).  He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Louisville School of Nursing (Louisville, KY) and a System Educator in the Norton Healthcare System.  Paul’s research focus centers on Health Services Research, developing and deepening the concepts of resilience and workplace engagement with a long term goal of developing/implementing interventions which improve resilience.  He partners with bedside & stretcherside nurses in projects such as developing a critical incident debriefing process with pediatric nurses, analyzing workplace issues such as bullying, violence, and fatigue, and improving perinatal loss care.


Dr. Clark’s focus is on Health Service Research, in particular the concept of Moral Burden, which includes moral distress, fatigue, and moral residue as it affects workplace conditions of direct patient care providers in the Emergency Department and other hospital settings.  Topics of interest include but are not limited to workplace violence and bullying as related to Moral Distress and how Moral Distress in healthcare workers can develop into Moral Fatigue.  Moral Fatigue is a long-term, chronic experience of Moral Distress.  Moral Fatigue can lead to burnout, depression, and dysfunctional coping mechanisms such as lateral violence/bullying, absenteeism, and presenteeism (not adequately carrying out one’s job role because of persistent and chronic negative feelings).


Education:

  • PhD: Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, 2010
  • MSN, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, 2006
  • BSN, St. Louis University, 1999
  • MA: Theology, Washington Theological Union, 1997
  • BA: Biology, St. Louis University, 1989

Educational Interests:

University of Louisville, School of Nursing
  • Pharmacotherapeutics [Didactic] (N395) – Fall & Spring Semesters:  2014 – current academic year
  • Foundations for Professional Nursing Practice/Theoretical Nursing Interventions (TNI) (Didactic) – Fall & Spring Semesters: 2014 – current academic year
Kentucky Institute of International Studies – nursing courses taught in Tanzania, East Africa, 2016, 2018
  • Global Health Care [Didactic] (NUR317-2) – 2016, 2018 (Summer)

  • Special Topics:  Cultural Influences which Impact Quality Healthcare Delivery [Didactic] (NUR317-1) – 2016, 2018 (Summer)