Anne Braden Memorial Lecture

Keeanga-Yahmatta Taylor delivered the 12th Annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture on November 1, 2018

On Thursday, November 1, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor delivered the 12th Annual Anne Braden Memorial lecture to a packed house in Strickler Hall's Middleton Auditorium. Her talk, "From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation," was based on her 2016 book of the same name. 

The author of two books, From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation (Haymarket Books, 2016) and How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective (Haymarket Books, 2017), Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor been awarded the Lannan Foundation’s Cultural Freedom Award for an Especially Notable Book and the 2018 Lambda Literary Award for LGBTQ Nonfiction. From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality, while connecting anti-police brutality protests with a larger anti-capitalist movement. Race matters. Class matters.   

Taylor received national attention in 2016 when she was forced to cancel speeches in Washington and California due to violent threats from the right-wing after referring to Donald Trump as “a racist, sexist megalomaniac” in a commencement speech at Hampshire College. Her insight and voice are more vital than ever in today’s political climate, and we are honored to host her visit to Louisville. 

Dr. Taylor is currently Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, after serving as the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2013-2014.

See coverage from the Louisville Cardinal here

  

   

 

 

Each year, the ABI puts on an Anne Braden Memorial Lecture in U.S. civil rights movement history.

This event is free and open to the public and typically takes place in the fall semester. Our first-ever lecturer was Julian Bond, longtime president of the NAACP, an early leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and a decades-long friend of Anne Braden. Bond packed a crowd of about 600 people into the Brown-Williamson Room of Cardinal Stadium on April 4, 2007. This event and date also marked the grand opening of the Anne Braden Institute*s reading room in Ekstrom Library. A press conference prior to the lecture celebrated the grand opening, at which Bond made a few opening remarks, then cut a ribbon and led the crowd into the newly created space.

Topics include:

Freedom is a Constant Struggle

Freedom is a Constant Struggle

2016 – Angela Y Davis's lecture was inspired by her 2015 book of the same title, Freedom is a Constant Struggle.

Freedom is a Constant Struggle - Read More…

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide

2015 – Emory University historian Carol Anderson's lecture was inspired by Anderson’s essay for the Washington Post titled “Ferguson Isn’t About Black Rage Against Cops. It’s White Rage Against Progress” – which immediately went viral — and is also the subject of a forthcoming book.

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide - Read More…

From Freedom Summer to Ferguson: Why we need a new culture of belonging

From Freedom Summer to Ferguson: Why we need a new culture of belonging

2014 – University of California Berkeley professor of law, African American studies and ethnic studies John A. Powell, J.D. provided insights based on decades of research and activism in the areas of race, structural racism, ethnicity, housing, poverty and democracy.

From Freedom Summer to Ferguson: Why we need a new culture of belonging - Read More…

Why the Past Won’t Go Away: The Crisis of History in the Age of Post-Racialism

Why the Past Won’t Go Away: The Crisis of History in the Age of Post-Racialism

2013 – Schomburg Center director Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad spoke about how knowing the past directly relates to understanding the present race-related crises.

Why the Past Won’t Go Away: The Crisis of History in the Age of Post-Racialism - Read More…

Neoliberalism and the War on Our Youth

Neoliberalism and the War on Our Youth

2012 – African American studies scholar, author and UCLA professor, Robin D.G. Kelley addressed mass incarceration, punitive measures against children of color in public schools, Trayvon Martin, the Occupy Movement and racism, and more in his talk for the 6th Annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture.

Neoliberalism and the War on Our Youth - Read More…

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

2011 – Author Dr. Michelle Alexander was the guest speaker for the fifth annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture featuring a presentation of her book.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness - Read More…

“Creating a Vital Transformative Change In the Struggle For American Freedom”

“Creating a Vital Transformative Change In the Struggle For American Freedom”

2010 – The fourth annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture featured a presentation by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, a cultural historian, singer/composer, student activist leader veteran of the Albany, Georgia Civil Rights Movement; and a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC Freedom Singers).

“Creating a Vital Transformative Change In the Struggle For American Freedom” - Read More…

From Civil Rights to Economic Justice: The Freedom Movement’s Unfinished Business

From Civil Rights to Economic Justice: The Freedom Movement’s Unfinished Business

2009 – The 3rd Annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture featured Prof. Michael Honey, who delivered a lecture entitled, “From Civil Rights to Economic Justice: The Freedom Movement’s Unfinished Business”.

From Civil Rights to Economic Justice: The Freedom Movement’s Unfinished Business - Read More…

What Now? What Next? Revisiting the Radical Voices of the Civil Rights Movement

What Now? What Next? Revisiting the Radical Voices of the Civil Rights Movement

2008 – 2nd Annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture: Dr. Ransby is author of the award-winning Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision, and associate professor of history/African American Studies/Gender and Women*s Studies at Univ. of Illinois-Chicago.

What Now? What Next? Revisiting the Radical Voices of the Civil Rights Movement - Read More…

2007: A Race Odyssey

2007: A Race Odyssey

2007 – The first Anne Braden Memorial Lecture guest speaker, the late Julian Bond, was a civil rights icon and catalyst for change during the Civil Rights Movement.

2007: A Race Odyssey - Read More…