News

UofL residents fulfill another successful fellowship match

Class of 2017 continues trend of near perfection in fellowship matches for UofL internal medicine residents
UofL residents fulfill another successful fellowship match

Many members of the of the UofL Internal Medicine Residency Program seeking fellowship appointments were matched successfully for the 2017-2018 academic year.


Several members of the University of Louisville Internal Medicine Residency Program were successful in their quest for fellowship matches following their graduation in 2017, including five who will continue their training at UofL.

"Once again, the UofL Internal Medicine Residency Program is happy to announce an excellent match for our residents who sought fellowship positions!" Dr. Jennifer Koch, director of the UofL Internal Medicine Residency Program said. "We are very proud of their hard work which led to such a successful outcome. The high levels of scholarship and clinical excellence among our residents are evident in these results."

Over the past five years, nearly all of the program's internal medicine residents have successfully matched into their choice of fellowship.

"It is always a joy to see our residents move to the next stage of their careers successfully," Dr. Jesse Roman, Chairman of the University of Louisville Department of Medicine said. "They are fully prepared to maneuver the ever-changing climate of healthcare and we can't be more proud. They represent the face of the department and I know they will represent us well."

Those from The University of Louisville who matched for 2017-2018 include:

Doctor
Specialty
Institution

Shifat Ahmed

Lisanne Anders

Chris Angus

Michael Burk

Corey Cavanaugh

Chris Clarke

Kristen Gonter-Aubin

Nikhil Kadle

Richard Kim

Nathan Liu

Patrick McKenzie

Andy Patel

Bobby Pearce

John Price

Taj Rahman

Bilal Salame

Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology

Cardiology

Pulmonary/Critical Care

Nephrology

Pulmonary/Critical Care

Hematology/Oncology

Gastroenterology

Pulmonary/Critical Care

Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology

Cardiology

Pulmonary/Critical Care

Pulmonary/Critical Care

Hematology/Oncology

University of Arizona-Phoenix

University of Louisville

University of Arizona-Tucson

Indiana University

Yale University

University of South Alabama

University of South Florida-Moffitt Cancer Center

University of Florida

University of Louisville

University of Louisville

University of Utah

University of Louisville

Allegheny College

University of Louisville

University of Kentucky

University of Florida

Very sad news: Professor Steve Myers passed away December 4, 2016

Very sad news:  Professor Steve Myers passed away December 4, 2016

Dr. Steve Myers

Dear Friends,

It is with great sadness that we communicate the recent passing of Steven R. Myers, PhD on December 4, 2016.  Dr. Myers was recruited to the University of Louisville in 1991. He was promoted through the ranks to Professor and Associate Chair for Professional Education in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology.  

Dr. Myers served as course director for numerous pharmacology-based courses taught to medical, dental, nursing, graduate, and undergraduate students. He was recognized for his innovation in teaching via receipt of the Health Science Center Technology Innovation Teaching Award and by his nomination for numerous teaching awards at the University of Louisville. 

Dr. Myers also had an outstanding international reputation for excellence in teaching and research.  He was the founding editor of the Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.  He was frequently invited as a teacher and examiner of medical and graduate students at universities in Egypt and the Caribbean. He was very active and successful in international educational and research collaborations, particularly in EgyptHe led the effort to initiate a PhD partnership with Cairo University and Ain Shams University.  He served as an invited plenary speaker and keynote speaker at international meetings held in Egypt last year.  He chaired an international symposium entitled “Recent Challenges beyond the Usual Toxicological and Public Health Challenges in Africa” at the annual meetings of the Society of Toxicology.  

Dr. Myers had an active research career including studies of drug and xenobiotic metabolism and biomarkers of chemical exposure and effects.  He developed the first widely applicable biomarker for human exposure to PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) through his development of chromatographic and mass spec techniques which allowed the detection of hemoglobin adducts of PAH in maternal and fetal blood.

Dr. Myers served on the United States Environmental Protection Agency technical qualifications review panel for the evaluation of individuals for promotion in the United States government and frequent reviewer of NIH grant proposals.  He was a member of the U.S. Department for Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control Environmental Safety and Occupational Health Study Section.

Dr. Myers served as editor or associate editor of several scientific journals.  He held leadership positions in several scientific organizations, including Vice President and President of the Ohio Valley Society of Toxicology, Chair of the Awards Committee and Secretary/Treasurer of the International Society for Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds, and Secretary/Treasurer of the Risk Assessment Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology.

Dr. Myers served on numerous committees within the School of Medicine and at the University. These committees included the School of Medicine Faculty Forum (including service as secretary and vice chair), University of Louisville Graduate Council, University of Louisville Faculty Senate and its Academic Programs Committee,  the School of Medicine Admissions Committee,  Educational Policy Committee, and Second Year Curriculum Committee, the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Recruitment and Admissions Committee, and the Department Faculty Teaching Evaluation Committee he chaired.

His contributions to the University of Louisville and the nation are substantial and he will be deeply missed by his colleagues and students.  A special resolution in recognition of his service was adopted by the faculty of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology on December 6, 2016 and by the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on December 7, 2016.

He is survived by his wife Jane and children Alex and Katie, both of whom are currently enrolled as UofL students.  As stated in his obituary,  in lieu of flowers, memorials for Professor Myers can be designated for graduate student support in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. Gifts should be made out to "UofL Foundation" and mailed to UofL Foundation Cardinal Station, 215 Central Ave. Ste. 300, Louisville, KY, 40208.  In the memo area of the check, indicate "In Memory of Steven Myers."

Groundwork laid for additional collaboration with Wenzhou Medical University of China

Groundwork laid for additional collaboration with Wenzhou Medical University of China

UofL and Wenzhou representatives

Faculty and students at UofL and Wenzhou Medical University of Wenzhou, Zhejiang in China have new opportunities for collaboration thanks to an international letter of understanding signed by UofL and WMU officials on Friday at UofL. The two-year agreement facilitates the exchange of faculty, students and information for educational and research purposes.

Lu Fan, M.D., O.D., president of WMU, Liang Guang, Ph.D., dean of the College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and other WMU representatives visited UofL on Nov. 11 to meet with Dale Billingsley, Ph.D., acting provost at UofL, Mordean Taylor-Archer, Ph.D., vice provost for diversity and international affairs, David Hein, Ph.D., vice provost for academic strategy, and administrators of the UofL School of Medicine. Fan, Taylor-Archer and Toni Ganzel, M.D., M.B.A., dean of the School of Medicine, signed the agreement, which expresses the desire of both universities to pursue mutually beneficial collaboration on educational and research activities. 

The agreement reinforces an existing partnership between WMU and UofL’s Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, which was signed in 2013. Nine graduate students from WMU are enrolled in the Ph.D. program in pharmacology and toxicology at UofL.

UofL and WMU officials hope the agreement will lead to additional partnership activities, particularly involving the UofL Department of Pediatrics. 

 

Nov. 17, 2016

UofL Cancer Education Program Students Present Invited Talks at International Cancer Conference

Christian Bradley and Tiana Martin delivered invited presentations of their cancer research projects at the Biennial Science of Global Prostate Cancer Disparities in Black Men Conference, University of Florida Health Cancer Center, Orlando, Fl, November 12, 2016.

Christian Bradley, a graduate of Howard University, presented:  "Immune and Inflammatory Sequence Variants Jointly Modify Prostate Cancer Among Men of African Descent".

Tiana Martin, an undergraduate student enrolled at Spelman College presented: "Non-synergistic Interaction Along the CCR5-CXCR5-CCR7 Axis and Prostate Cancer".

Both Christian and Tiana carried out their research projects in the University of Louisville Cancer Education Program under the direction of Dr. La Creis Kidd, Associate Professor of Pharmacology & Toxicology and Our Highest Potential Endowed Chair in Cancer Research.

Christian Bradley

                                                                                                                                   

 

UofL faculty present invited lectures at international conference in Egypt

Drs. Osama El-Tawil, Jon Freedman, George Rodgers and Jill Steinbach-Rankins presented invited lectures to an international conference entitled “Safer Environment for Better Future” held November 2016 in Egypt.  The conference was organized and sponsored by Cairo University, The Animal Research Institute and the Egyptian Association for Chemistry and Environmental Health.

Drs. Jon Freedman, Osama El-Tawil, George Rodgers and Jill Steinbach-Rankins

Samantha Carlisle receives 1st place award in oral presentation category at KAS meeting

Pharmacology and Toxicology PhD candidate Samantha Carlisle received the 1st place award in the oral presentation category "Health Sciences" at the 102nd annual meeting of the Kentucky Academy of Sciences held in Louisville in November.  The title of her presentation was "Untargeted polar metabolomics reveals differences in palmitoleic acid between transformed MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells expressing varying levels of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1".

Samantha is pursuing her PhD dissertation research in the laboratory of Professor David Hein.

Samantha Carlisle

Pharmacology and Toxicology students and faculty receive awards at Ohio Valley Society of Toxicology

Pharmacology and Toxicology students and faculty receive awards at Annual Meeting of the Ohio Valley Society of Toxicology in Indianapolis hosted by Eli Lilly Company


Graduate Students (Platform Awards)

First Place (Givaudan Award)- Cierra Sharp 

The Effects of Age and Cancer In A Clinically-Relevant Mouse Model Of Cisplatin-Induced Kidney Injury.  Mentor Dr. Leah Siskind

Second Place- Lauren Poole 

Acute-on-chronic alcohol exposure using the “NIAAA Model” concomitantly damages the liver and lung.  Mentor Dr. Gavin Arteel

 

Graduate Students (Poster Awards)

First Place- Laila Al-Eryani

Induction of Cell Cycle Pathways In Human Keratinocytes At Early Stages Of Chronic Exposure To Low Arsenite.  Mentor Dr. Christopher States

Second Place- Aaron Neely 

The Bacterial Quorum Sensing Molecule N-(3-Oxo-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Inhibits Tumor Growth Independent of Bcl-2 Proteins.  Mentor Dr. Chi Li

Third Place-Qian Lin 

Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy Through an Anti-inflammatory Mechanism.  Mentor Dr. Yi Tan

 

Postdoctoral Students (Platform Awards)

First Place- Xiaozhen Dai

Elevating CXCR7 improves angiogenic function of EPCs via Akt/GSK-3beta/Fyn-mediated Nrf2 activation in diabetic limb ischemia. Mentor Dr. Yi Tan

Second Place-Wesley Abplanalp 

Benzene Exposure is Associated with Insulin Resistance in Humans and Mice.  Mentor Dr. Timothy O’Toole

Pharmacology and Toxicology students and faculty receive awards at Research!Louisville

Pharmacology and toxicology students and faculty receive awards at Research!Louisville:

Doctoral Basic Science Graduate Student Award

1st place      Laila Al-Eryani

Induction of Cell Cycle Pathways in Human Keratinocytes at Early Stages of Chronic Exposure to Low Arsenite. Mentor: J. Christopher States

3rd place      Anna Lang

Critical Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in Liver Damage Caused by VC Metabolites in Mice.  Mentor: Julianne Beier

Master’s Basic Science Graduate Student Award

1st place      Al Hassan Kyakulaga

Withaferin A Alone and in Combination with Paclitaxel Inhibits TGF-ß1 Induced Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition, Invasion and Metastasis of Lung Cancer in Vitro.  Mentor: Ramesh Gupta

2nd place      Joshua Royal

Plant-Made Cholera Toxin B Subunit: A Candidate Oral Immunotherapeutic Agent Enhances Colonic Mucosal Wound Healing. Mentor: Nobuyuki Matoba

Basic Research in Public Health Award 

Collin Stocke

Arsenic Induces Functional Changes of ZRANB2 and Expression of hsa-miR-186. Mentor: J. Christopher States

NCI Cancer Education Program Norbert J. Burzynski Award Professional Student Category

2nd place      Corey Ketchem

Novel Drug Combinations Sensitize Leukemia Cells to a Bcl-2 Inhibitor. Mentor: Levi Beverly

NCI Cancer Education Program Norbert J. Burzynski Award Undergraduate Student Category

1st place tie Mary Ann Smith

Paracrine Induction of Macrophages by Melanoma Exosomes.Mentor: Joshua Hood

2nd place tie Kyle Bilyeu

Sensitizing Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutics by Modulating Intracellular Iron Homeostasis. Mentor: Chi Li

3rd place tie Benjamin Fouts

Characterization of Acidic pH Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Ovarian Cancer Diagnostics. Mentor: Lacey McNally

3rd place tie  Maya Huss

Transport and Distribution of Stealth and Cell Penetrating Nanoparticles in Cervical Cancer Tissue Mimics. Mentor: Jill Steinbach-Rankins

Louisville Chapter-Women in Medicine and Science

2nd place      Laila Al-Eryani

Induction of Cell Cycle Pathways in Human Keratinocytes at Early Stages of Chronic Exposure to Low Arsenite. Mentor: J. Christopher States

JGBCC High School Scholars

1st place      Nivedha Loganathan

Plant-Made Cholera Toxin B Subunit: A Molecular Look at Wound Healing Mechanisms. Mentor: Nobuyuki Matoba

Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation Basic Science Research Faculty Award

Walter (Burt) Watson

Aging Alters Cystine Transport, Regulation of the Extracellular Redox Environment, and Expression of Extracellular Matrix Components in Primary Mouse Lung Fibroblasts  

UofL-led researchers developing ethical standards for biorepositories

Four-year, $1.7 million grant examining policies that govern use of biological samples, data
UofL-led researchers developing ethical standards for biorepositories

Kyle Brothers, M.D., Ph.D.

What if a patient gave permission to a researcher at her local hospital to use her blood or specimen for research, and later the researcher decided to share that sample with others? What if that patient received assurances that the specimen would be used only at her local hospital? Does the researcher have an obligation to notify the patient that the sample is now going to be used by others? Should the researcher be required to get another, separate consent form from that patient?

These are some of the difficult ethical questions the University of Louisville’s Kyle Brothers, M.D., Ph.D., will tackle with a four-year, $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and its National Human Genome Research Institute. It is a clash of personal privacy concerns with the need to broaden and share the tools of research – a bioethical dilemma.

“We’re looking at the commitments researchers have made to participants and communities, and how they can keep those commitments when they share this information with others,” said Brothers who is assistant professor of pediatrics and affiliated with UofL’s Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law.

Brothers is teaming with researchers at Case Western Reserve University to take a look at networks of biorepositories across the United States. Biorepositories are the facilities at universities, hospitals, laboratories and elsewhere where blood, tissue and other human specimens are frozen and stored, along with data about the donors of these samples.

Brothers’ research will focus on what policies should be in place when samples and data are shared across networks of multiple biorepositories working together.

As his research moves along, Brothers will convene a meeting with leaders in the United States biorepository field to share guidance on data access, governance and the ethical obligations to those whose specimens they have in storage.

“We’re going to be helping set best practices for biorepositories across the country,” he said.

Brothers also practices pediatric primary care with UofL Physicians-Pediatrics and serves on the ethics committee at Children’s Hospital. Along with a research focus on the ethics of genomic research, he studies the translation of genomic and other technologies into clinical care.

 

 

 

Department members shine at 2016 Research!Louisville

Annual event highlights, promotes excellence and public awareness of health sciences research at the Louisville Medical Center
Department members shine at 2016 Research!Louisville

Walter "Bert" Watson, Ph.D., receives the Jewish Hospital & St. Mary's Foundation Basic Science Research Faculty Award at Research!Louisville 2016


Several members of the University of Louisville Department of Medicine had good showings in the recent 2016 Research!Louisville competitions, held in conjunction with the event's 21st annual showcase of health/life sciences research conducted at UofL.

A panel of university faculty judges selected the winners of this year's contest from hundreds of entries in the categories of professional/clinical students, basic science grad students, postgraduates and faculty.

Here's a look at finished at or near the top in their respective categories:

Norton Healthcare Medical Student Award

 

Research Associate Award

 

Research Staff Award

 

Public Health & Information Sciences

 

NCI Cancer Education Program Norbert J. Burzynski Award Professional Student Category

 

NCI Cancer Education Program Norbert J. Burzynski Award Undergraduate Student Category

 

Jewish Hospital & St. Mary's Foundation Basic Science Research Faculty Award

 

JGBCC High School Scholars

 

Ruth Greenberg Award for Excellence in Medical Education Research

Callen begins term as Association of Professors of Dermatology president

UofL dermatology chief will serve a two-year stint as head of national organization promoting medical education, research, and patient care among dermatology training programs
Callen begins term as Association of Professors of Dermatology president

Dr. Jeffrey P. Callen


A University of Louisville dermatologist added yet another honor to a long list of career accolades.

Jeffrey P. Callen, M.D., FACP, FAAD, professor of dermatology and chief of the UofL Division of Dermatology began his presidency of the Association of Professors of Dermatology (ADP) on October 7, 2016.

Callen's term as president of the ADP will run for two years.

Established in 1960 by leading educators in dermatology, the purpose of the ADP is the promotion of medical education, research, and patient care, particularly in undergraduate and graduate dermatology training programs.

"We are so pleased to see Dr. Callen assume the leadership of this prestigious organization," Dr. Jesse Roman, Chairman of the UofL Department of Medicine said. "He is an outstanding member of our community and we are extremely proud of the many achievements he has had throughout a stellar career."

A world-renowned dermatologist, Callen joined the faculty at the University of Louisville in 1977, attaining the rank of professor in 1988 and being appointed as chief of the Division of Dermatology the same year.

Among his accomplishments, he served on the Board of Directors of the Dermatology Foundation from 1983-88; the American Academy of Dermatology from 1994-98 and 2003-04 as vice president; and the Association of Professors of Dermatology since 2003. He was the chair of the Council on Education of the American Academy of Dermatology 2003-07. He has been a member of the board of the American Board of Dermatology and the American Dermatological Association.

He is a past president of the Medical Dermatology Society and was awarded the society’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011. In 2009 Callen received the Thomas Pearson, Ph.D. Education Award from the American Academy of Dermatology.

Callen is the author or co-author of 84 original articles, 181 case reports, 149 review articles, 50 editorials, 15 books, 276 book chapters and 165 abstracts. He has served as editor or deputy editor of the Archives of Dermatology, Journal Watch Dermatology and the Dermatology Section of UpToDate. He is currently the associate editor of JAMA Dermatology. His book, Dermatologic Signs of Systemic Disease, now in its fifth edition, was recently published.

Locally, Callen has served on the boards of the Jewish Community Center, Jewish Family and Vocational Services, Actors Theatre of Louisville, the Kentucky Arts and Crafts Foundation and the Speed Art Museum.

Schapmire will lead world's largest oncology social work group

UofL researcher to guide world's largest professional organization entirely dedicated to advancing excellence in the psychosocial care of people with cancer, their families and caregivers
Schapmire will lead world's largest oncology social work group

Tara Schapmire, Ph.D.


A University of Louisville faculty member has been tapped for leadership roles with the world's largest organization of professionals who provide psychosocial services to people with cancer and their families and caregivers.

Tara Schapmire, Ph.D., has been elected president-elect of the Association of Oncology Social Work. Her three-year term begins in January 2017 with one year as president-elect, followed by one year as president and the final year as past president.

Schapmire is an assistant professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine, Palliative Care and Medical Education of the Department of Medicine. She also is on the faculty of the Kent School of Social Work.

As a long-time oncology and palliative care social worker, Schapmire's research interests include psychosocial care of cancer survivors and their families, gerontology, health disparities, communication and cancer, caregiver issues, palliative care, survivorship, end of life care and interprofessional education.

She is co-investigator on a Health Resources and Services Administration grant aimed at development of an interdisciplinary gerontology curriculum for learners in medicine, nursing, social work, dentistry and pharmacy.

As a co-investigator on the $7.5 million Kentucky LEADS Collaborative, she and her team are dedicated to reducing the burden of lung cancer in Kentucky and beyond through development, evaluation, and dissemination of novel, community-based interventions to promote provider education, survivorship care prevention and early detection regarding lung cancer.

Her past research includes a National Institutes of Health grant focused on development of an interdisciplinary oncology palliative care curriculum for schools of medicine, social work and nursing and chaplaincy residency programs and an American Cancer Society-funded study of emotional distress in older adults with cancer.

Schapmire has been involved in the interprofessional education, research and service efforts of the School of Medicine. She also has taught classes in the Kent School since 2008, most notably in the master's degree program and the psychosocial oncology specialization, in addition to other master's level practice and research classes.

She is also a past national board member of the Association of Oncology Social Work and vice president of the American Clinical Social Work Association.

In addition, Schapmire is a Distinguished Scholar and Fellow in the Social Work Academy of the National Academies of Practice and has received the AOSW/American Cancer Society Leadership in Oncology Social Work Award.

She also is a past recipient of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine’s Research Scholar Award and the American Cancer Society's C.A.R.E. Award for service to people with cancer and their families.

2016 NCI Cancer Education Program students to present posters at Research!Louisville

The NCI Cancer Education Program 2016 cohort of 35 undergraduate and professional students from UofL and across the country will present their research projects at Research!Louisville scheduled for October 11-14.

The professional students present Tuesday afternoon Oct 11 and the undergraduate students present on Wednesday afternoon Oct 12.

A listing of the 2016 class, their faculty mentors, their institutions, and their abstracts are available at link

Student research posters are available at link.

Special congratulations to Christian Bradley (from Howard University) and Tiana Martin (from Spelman College) who were recently notified that their cancer project abstracts were accepted for oral presentations at the Global Prostate Cancer Disparities in Black Men Conference scheduled for November in Orlando, FL.  The faculty mentor for both students is Dr. La Creis Kidd, Our Highest Endowed Chair in Cancer Research and Associate Professor of Pharmacology & Toxicology.

M&I students publish first author papers

M&I students publish first author papers

Shuvasree Sengupta

Two M&I students recently published their first - first author papers in August and September. 

Shuvaree Sengupta, PhD candidate in the lab of Dr. Thomas Mitchell was first author on a paper published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology in August.  Shuvaree’s  paper “A Pseudomonas aeruginosa hepta-acylated lipid A variant associated with cystic fibrosis selectively activates human neutrophils” published in Journal of Leukocyte Biology can be found here:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27538572

ArmstrongCortney Armstrong, PhD candidate in the lab of Dr. Silvia Uriarte was first author on a paper published in Infection and Immunity in September.  Cortney’s  paper “Filifactor alocis promotes neutrophil degranulation and chemotactic activity” published in Infection and Immunity can be accessed here:  http://iai.asm.org/content/early/2016/09/13/IAI.00496-16.abstract

Bringing specialized heart care where it’s needed

Imagine if your baby needed ongoing specialized cardiac care -- and no doctor in your town could provide it.

That’s the prospect facing families throughout rural Kentucky and into parts of Ohio and West Virginia. So for the past decade now, University of Louisville Physicians has brought expert care to children, teens and adults with known or suspected heart conditions in these areas.

Once a month, UofL Physicians pediatric cardiologists and staff travel from Louisville to Ashland, Ky., for example, to provide local care as a convenience to patients and families who otherwise would have to make the long drive elsewhere to receive specialized care.

In partnership with Kosair Children’s Hospital, UofL Physicians fills the gap for families in outlying areas with a statewide network from Paducah to Ashland that provides specialized services, including outpatient clinics and diagnostic testing locally and via telemedicine. UofL Physicians pediatric cardiology specialists have been providing heart care to children and adults in the Ashland area for over 10 years, serving patients in parts of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.

Patients are currently seen two days a month. In addition to Ashland, the UofL Physicians team travels to seven other rotating sites across the state.

Having this type of expert care close to home is helpful for patients like 2-year-old Bonnie Gandee, who was diagnosed by UofL Physicians in Ashland with congenital heart disease before she was born. 

Brian Holland, M.D.A routine ultrasound for her mother, Anna, revealed something could be wrong with her baby’s heart. With no specialists near her hometown of Pedro, Ohio, she was referred to UofL Physicians Pediatric Cardiology for a fetal cardiac scan.

Brian Holland, M.D., determined that Bonnie had very complicated congenital heart disease, with her heart lacking all four of the chambers seen in a normal, healthy heart. It was clear she would need several surgeries to correct the problem.

Erle Austin IIIWhile her family could have taken her to a larger city in Ohio for treatment, her mother, Anna, said the Ashland office was convenient and “we liked Dr. Holland. We liked Louisville, and we liked Kosair Children’s Hospital and, being attached to Norton Hospital, we could be at same hospital with her when she was born.”

Bonnie ultimately had three surgeries, the first at just two weeks old and the most recent at almost 2 years of age, all performed by UofL Physicians heart surgeon Erle Austin III, M.D.

Brad Keller, M.D.Now that her surgeries are complete, Bonnie only has to see Brad Keller, M.D., her regular cardiologist with UofL Physicians, every 6 months in Ashland.

“Living in Ohio, it’s great that we can see him in Ashland, which is just 25 minutes away. There is not really anything around here,” Anna said. And with an hour round trip to appointments instead of six-and-a-half hours, “it’s less stress on the family” to try to find child care for Bonnie’s 4-year-old brother, she said.

 Worldwide, nearly one in every 100 babies is born with some type of heart disease, making congenital heart disease the most common birth defect. Bonnie is one of several children in Ashland to be diagnosed with congenital heart disease before she was born. Thanks to advances in medical care, more than 90 percent of children born with congenital heart disease now survive well into adulthood.

With the recent addition of Craig Alexander, M.D., UofL Physicians has the first doctor in Kentucky who has advanced fellowship training in the care of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD).

Patients seen remotely in areas such as Ashland can be referred to the Kosair Children’s Hospital Heart Center in Louisville if advanced testing, hospitalization or invasive catheter-based or surgical care is required. The Heart Center is staffed by pediatric cardiologists, subspecialists and heart surgeons with UofL Physicians.

In all, there are more than 2 million people of all ages with congenital heart disease in the United States alone. Thousands live in Kentucky, and many of these patients are now adults with congenital heart disease. 

To refer a patient to the UofL Physicians Ashland office, call 502-585-4802, Ext. 246. For more information on UofL Physicians pediatric cardiology and adult congenital heart disease services around the state, visit http://www.uoflphysicians.com/pediatric-cardiology.

 

 

PhTx graduate students Laila Al-Eryani and Hongxue Xie receive travel awards to present their research

Laila Al-Eryani PhTx graduate students Laila Al-Eryani and Hongxue Xie received travel awards to present their research (posters) at the NIEHS-sponsored Endocrine Disrupter Conference held September 18-20 in Bethesda, MD. 

Laila is a PhD candidate pursuing her dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. Chris States.  Hongzue is a PhD candidate pursuing his dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. Matt Cave.






 

Pediatric teaching hospital renamed Norton Children’s Hospital

Pediatric teaching hospital renamed Norton Children’s Hospital

UofL's pediatric teaching hospital will be known as Norton Children's effective Nov. 10.

Norton Healthcare announced Sept. 28 that its children’s hospital -- which also serves as the teaching hospital for the University of Louisville -- will be renamed Norton Children’s Hospital, effective Nov. 10.

Formerly Kosair Children’s Hospital, Norton and Kosair Charities reached a mutual decision in June to end its 35-year naming rights agreement with the name “Kosair” removed from all Norton-owned medical facilities and practices, including Norton Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Norton Children’s Medical Center and Norton Children’s Medical Associates along with the downtown children’s hospital.

As Division President of Women’s and Children’s Services Thomas D. Kmetz emphasized during the announcement in the hospital lobby Tuesday morning, only the name will change. “Our name may be changing, but our commitment to children” will not, he said.

The children’s hospital is affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine and is part of the UofL Health Sciences Center.

“Our affiliation with Norton Children’s Hospital is integral to the Department of Pediatrics’ quadruple mission in education, patient care, research and community engagement,” Gerard P. Rabalais, M.D., the Billy F. Andrews Endowed Chair in Pediatrics, said. “As the hospital makes this change, we look forward to our continued partnership in providing the best of care to the children of Kentuckiana and beyond.”

Norton Healthcare is embarking on what it calls a “gradual change in all signage and other materials” to incorporate the new name.

 

PhTx graduate student Aaron Neely receives ASCB travel award to present research

Aaron Neely, a PhD candidate in the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, has received an American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Travel Award to present his research at their annual meeting in San Francisco from December 3-7, 2016.  Aaron is conducting his dissertation research under the direction of Dr. Chi Li.

Zimple Kurlawala awarded Arno Spatola Endowment Graduate Research Fellowship from the Institute or Molecular Diversity & Drug Design

Zimple Kurlawala has been awarded the Arno Spatola Endowment Graduate Research Fellowship from the Institute or Molecular Diversity & Drug Design (IMD3).  Zimple is a PhD candidate in pharmacology and toxicology carrying out her dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. Levi Beverly.

   Zimple Kurlawala

Dr. Levi Beverly receives NIH diversity supplement to support dissertation research of Doug Saforo

Dr. Levi Beverly has been awarded an NIH diversity supplement to support the dissertation research project of Doug Saforo,  MD/PhD student in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology.  Doug is pursuing his PhD dissertation research under the direction of Drs. Levi Beverly and Leah Siskind.





Doug Saforo