News

M&I PhD Candidate receives NIH F31 award

PriceSarah Price, a graduate student in the laboratory of Dr. Matthew Lawrenz, has been awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award (F31) from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for her PhD research entitled “Identification of a novel zinc acquisition system in Yersinia pestis”. This three year fellowship will support Sarah’s research in the field of nutritional immunity.

 

                                     

Rare Disease Day (8/2/19)

August 2, 2019 was proclaimed as Rare Diseases Day in Kentucky.  Gov. Bevin made the proclamation at the University of Louisville.  He was accompanied by Dr. Thomas Abell, Director of GI Motility in the UofL School of Medicine.  Dr. Abell studies gastroparesis, a rare disease, and is considered to be a world authority on the condition.

16 UofL Department of Medicine faculty named 'Top Docs' for 2019

Annual survey conducted by Louisville Magazine and the Greater Louisville Medical Society leads to accolades for several UofL medicine faculty
16 UofL Department of Medicine faculty named 'Top Docs' for 2019

Louisville Magazine recently honored 16 faculty members from the UofL Department of Medicine as "Top Docs" for 2019

A group of 16 members of the University of Louisville Department of Medicine, the flagship department of the UofL School of Medicine, were recently recognized as "Top Docs" as voted on by their peers in the Louisville medical community in the August 2019 edition of Louisville Magazine.

"These results clearly demonstrate that the faculty of the University of Louisville Department of Medicine command the respect and regard of our community colleagues," Dr. Eleanor Lederer, interim chair of the UofL Department of Medicine said. "Our reputation as a resource for excellence in cutting edge clinical care is growing, and I am proud to serve as the interim chair of this dynamic department."

According to the guidelines of the survey, questionnaires were sent to the more than 2,000 members of the Greater Louisville Medical Society asking the question, "If you or a member of your family were in need of medical care or treatment, who among Louisville-area doctors would you choose to provide medical care in the following specialties?"

From the UofL Department of Medicine, those recognized include (categories as listed in the publication):

UofL Cancer Education Program Undergraduate Participants to Present Research Posters Friday Aug 2

The 19 undergraduate students in the 2019 cohort of the University of Louisville Cancer Education Program will present their research posters at the Undergraduate Research Symposium scheduled Friday, August 2 from noon to 3 pm in the Kosair Charities Clinical and Translational Research Building. 

In addition to UofL, undergraduate students in the 2019 cohort are pursuing their undergraduate studies at Emory University, Holmes Community College, Knox College, Oklahoma State University, Purdue University, University of Cincinnati, University of Dayton, University of Kentucky, University of North Carolina, University of Notre Dame, and the University of Southern California.  A listing of the 2019 cohort together with their faculty mentors is available here.

The student research posters to be presented on Aug 2 are available here.

Risks of vaping by children: What parents can do

As e-cigarette use increases among teenagers, it’s important for parents and caregivers to know the associated risks and what they can do to foster healthy habits in their children.

Although the liquid used in e-cigarettes does not include tobacco, it contains nicotine, which is highly addictive and poses dangers to children, said Heather Felton, M.D., medical director of the UofL Pediatrics – Sam Swope Kosair Charities Centre.

“Nicotine raises blood pressure and spikes adrenaline, thus increasing heart rate and the likelihood of having a heart attack,” Felton said. “It also can harm a child’s developing brain and parts of the brain that control attention, learning, mood and impulse control.”

The amount of nicotine in vaping liquids can vary among brands, but many contain more nicotine than a traditional cigarette. For instance, a single JUUL pod contains as much nicotine as a pack of 20 regular cigarettes, Felton said. The liquid can be a poison when swallowed or absorbed through skin or eyes. Also, vaping often leads to traditional tobacco product use.

What parents can do:

  • Set a good example by being tobacco-free.
  • Talk to your child about vaping and the risks of use.
  • Seek help from your child’s physician to explain to your child the health risks of vaping.
  • Encourage teachers and administrators at your child’s school to enforce tobacco-free policies.

 

 

ULP General Pediatrics Clinics earn national certification as patient-centered medical home

The three UofL Physicians – General Pediatrics clinics have earned Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) designation by the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

PCMH recognizes primary care practices with a team-based health care delivery model that provide comprehensive care to patients and are dedicated to continuous quality improvement for health outcomes. Designated practices put patients at the forefront and create strong relationships between patients and their clinical care teams.

Research shows that PCMHs improve quality, the patient experience and staff satisfaction while reducing health care costs, according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

“We’ve changed policies, procedures and day-to-day functioning to accommodate patients in every way we can,” said Melissa Hancock, M.D., UofL division director of general pediatrics. “All of our providers and staff are invested in our patients’ primary care. This is where they’re going to get their comprehensive health care needs met.”

UofL Physicians – General Pediatrics has clinics at the Novak Center for Children’s Health in downtown, Sam Swope Kosair Charities Centre on Eastern Parkway and on Stonestreet Road in southwest Louisville.

Norton Healthcare, UofL School of Medicine, UofL Physicians – Pediatrics sign Letter of Intent for new affiliation

The University of Louisville School of Medicine, UofL Physicians – Pediatrics and Norton Healthcare today announced they have signed a non-binding Letter of Intent (LOI) to create a new pediatric affiliation. 

The LOI allows the organizations to explore a more meaningful partnership as the organizations work toward a definitive agreement later this summer if approved by the UofL Board of Trustees.

The goal is to further align strategic, operational and financial interests to support pediatric care, teaching and research.

“We want to ensure we continue to promote healthy children and communities while maintaining our strong academic training programs and research, which translate into better care for children,” said UofL President Neeli Bendapudi, Ph.D. “We’ll do that by leveraging the strengths of the UofL School of Medicine, ULP – Pediatrics and Norton Healthcare.” 

“For many years, Norton Healthcare and Norton Children’s Hospital have worked closely with the University of Louisville through our academic affiliation,” said Russell F. Cox, president and chief executive officer of Norton Healthcare. “Each day, dedicated providers from both organizations work together to deliver quality care that children and their families need. Together we have grown specialty services for children in the important areas of heart, diabetes and cancer care. With this new initiative, we expect this type of growth to continue, and we are committed to identifying even better ways to meet the health care needs of children and families.”

DOM News Roundup: June 14, 2019

Taking a look at who was in the news from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine over the past week
DOM News Roundup: June 14, 2019

Taking a look at who was in the news from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine over the past week


 

Date

Who

Headline

Media

 

June 11

Ruth Carrico

Nanosonics sponsors educational symposium on standardizing ultrasound probe disinfection practices at APIC 2019
Showcases automated trophon2 complete reprocessing solution for optimized probe decontamination

Yahoo Finance

 

June 7

Roberto Bolli

Louisville Business First

“Distinguished Abstract” award for 2019 annual meeting of the AACC

Congratulations to Dr. Kirpich and colleagues. Their abstract has won the “Distinguished Abstract” award for 2019 annual meeting of the American Academy of Clinical Chemistry (AACC). “Decreased endogenous ω-6 PUFAs induced intestinal mucosa transcriptional reprogramming that contributed to amelioration of intestinal and liver injury in mice in a context of systemic inflammation and chronic ethanol exposure” by Dennis R. Warner, Ying L. Song, Jeffrey B. Warner, Craig J. McClain, and Irina A. Kirpich was one of 20 (out of 202 considered) to be so honored.

The Annual AACC meeting will be in August, 2019 in Anaheim, California.

DOM News Roundup: June 7, 2019

Taking a look at who was in the news from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine over the past week
DOM News Roundup: June 7, 2019

Taking a look at who was in the news from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine over the past week


 

Date

Who

Headline

Media

 

June 4

Ruth Carrico

McKnight's Long-Term Care News

 

June 3

Daniel Conklin

FDA Funds Massive New Vaping Study
University of Louisville is studying long-term effects of e-cigarettes

Soupwire.com

 

May 31

Mark Rothstein

Don't expect to keep that DNA test info private
Exploding demand for genetic profiles exposes gaps in legal protections

Crain's Chicago Business

 

UofL physicians, trainees advocate for patients

Internal medicine doctors take their case to national legislators in Washington, D.C.
UofL physicians, trainees advocate for patients

Drs. Clayton Smith and Sara Ellingwood represented the University of Louisville at the annual ACP Leadership day in Washington, D.C.

By Clayton Smith, M.D.

Clayton M. Smith, M.D., FACP, Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Program Director of the University of Louisville Internal Medicine Residency Program, and Sara Sadeghi Ellingwood, M.D., a PGY-2 Internal Medicine resident, recently traveled to the nation's capitol, Washington D.C., to advocate for internists and the patients they proudly serve.

The duo represented the Kentucky Chapter of the American College of Physicians (ACP) at its annual Leadership Day where they spoke to members of Congress, or their staff, from all of Kentucky's Congressional delegation, promoting the ACP's agenda, which prioritized the following agenda items:

  • The High Cost of Prescription Drugs
  • The Epidemic of Firearms-Related Injury and Death
  • Fund Federal Workforce, Medical and Health Services Research
  • Physician Payment under Medicare
  • Expand Coverage and Stabilize the Insurance Market
  • Reduce Unnecessary Administrative Tasks on Physicians and Patients
  • Healthy Women and Families Congress
  • Medical Education Training and Debt Congress


The Internal Medicine Residency Program prioritizes patient advocacy, and welcomes anyone who would like to contribute to the conversation. Please contact Dr. Smith at clayton.smith@louisville.edu if you have ideas about improving the health of Kentuckians, or sustaining their access to the healthcare system.

Visit https://www.acpservices.org/sites/default/files/shared/documents/leadership-day/19/priority-issues/2.pdf to learn more about the conversations Drs. Smith and Sadeghi had on behalf on the citizens of the Commonwealth.

UofL Hepatitis C program's “train the provider” program

The UofL Hepatitis C program has developed a “train the provider” program (KHAMP, Kentucky Hepatitis Academic Mentorship Program) to increase patient access to Hepatitis C treatments throughout the state and region.  Barbra Cave, APRN, has been highly active in this endeavor and has trained 277 providers since August 1, 2018.

This program was recently highlighted on Spectrum News:
https://spectrumnews1.com/ky/louisville/news/2019/05/17/hepatitis-c-in-kentucky#

UofL Cancer Education Program Selects 45 Students for 2019 Cohort

The UofL Cancer Education Program announces the selection of 45 students for the 2019 cohort consisting of 18 undergraduate students, 22 UofL medical students and 5 students selected to participate a second time in the program (4 medical and 1 undergraduate student).  In addition to UofL, undergraduate students in the 2019 cohort are pursuing their undergraduate studies at Emory University, Holmes Community College, Knox College, Oklahoma State University, Purdue University, University of Cincinnati, University of Dayton, University of Kentucky, University of North Carolina, University of Notre Dame, and the University of Southern California.  A listing of the 2019 cohort together with their faculty mentors is available here.

Meeting the needs of newly adopted children

The roughly 120,000 children adopted in the United States every year have high risk for physical, developmental and mental health issues, conditions that may have been unknown before joining their new families.

clinical report published online recently by the American Academy of Pediatrics offers guidance for pediatricians on the initial comprehensive medical evaluation of newly adopted children. The evaluation helps parents fully address their child’s physical and mental health and developmental needs, said V. Faye Jones, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.P.H., professor of pediatrics at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, and lead author of the report.

“The physician can help families prepare and work through expected questions and concerns during an early visit, even if they have limited information about the child’s past,” Jones said. “We know that many adopted children have previous chronic illnesses or are at risk for developing physical or mental health problems.”

Children awaiting adoption are at high risk of having been exposed prenatally to illegal drugs and/or alcohol as well as physical, emotional and sexual abuse, according to the report. Other early childhood factors that impact the health of adopted children include poverty and inadequate developmental stimulation. Common health issues these children face include growth failure, asthma, obesity, vision impairment, hearing loss, neurologic problems and sexually transmitted infections.

Soon after a child’s adoption, a pediatrician should conduct a comprehensive medical evaluation to confirm and clarify existing medical diagnoses, assess for previously unknown issues, discuss developmental, mental and behavioral concerns with parents and make referrals. The evaluation should include a thorough review of the child’s medical history, a complete physical examination and necessary diagnostic testing, according to the report.

Dr. Bing Li appointed University Scholar

Bing LiDr. Bing Li, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, was recognized as University Scholar in April 2019, an honor bestowed on select faculty  who significantly exceed the scholarship necessary for appointment, promotion and tenure at U of L and in doing so achieve a strong national reputation.  He is the second M&I faculty to receive this title.

First graduate of PhD partnership program with Cairo University

Mohamed Y. Mahmoud successfully defended his dissertation and will be awarded the PhD in pharmacology & toxicology at the UofL commencement ceremony in May.  Mohamed is the first graduate of the PhD partnership program with Cairo University.  He is pictured (third from left) with the members of his dissertation committee.  Dr. Jill Steinbach-Rankins and Dr. Donald Demuth were co-mentors.

 

PhTx graduate student receives first place award for research poster presentation at annual Experimental Biology meetings

 Shuhan Meng received the first place award for her research poster presentation at the annual Experimental Biology meetings in Orlando, Florida.  Shuhan is a PhD student in the pharmacology and toxicology program who matriculated via the PhD partnership with Jilin University.  She is pursuing her PhD dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. Chi Li.

 

Prevent sports-related eye injuries

More than 40 percent of all eye injuries are related to sports or recreational activities, accounting for more than 100,000 physician visits a year and costing more than $175 million. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that everyone, even people who do not require optical correction, use protective eyewear during sports.

“Ninety percent of sports-related eye injuries in school-aged children can be avoided with protective eyewear,” said Kara Tison, O.D., optometrist with UofL Physicians–Pediatric Eye Specialists. “Regular prescription glasses do not provide adequate protection, and if a trauma occurs, can cause more damage.”

It is important to choose protection that has been tested and meets standards from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), which establishes the guideline of recommended sports eye protection for children.

Sports eye protection needs to have an ASTM label and fit the athlete comfortably and properly. Health care professionals can suggest appropriate eyewear for young athletes.

If an eye injury occurs, it should be evaluated by a health care provider. While most ocular injuries are painful, some are painless and can cause permanent vision loss.

For treatment of a sports-related eye injury or more information on protective eyewear, call UofL Physicians–Eye Specialists at 502-588-0550 for an appointment.

UofL Cancer Education Program Alumni Present Research at ACC Meetings of the Minds

Alumni of the UofL Cancer Education Program were well represented at the recent ACC Meeting of the Minds held at the University of Louisville.  Five of the six students from UofL presenting their research were alumni of the program, including Noela Botaka from the 2017 cohort and Lloyd Bartley, Caleb Bridgwater, Alisha Deshmukh, and Kennedy Walls from the 2018 cohort.

For information about the ACC Meeting of the Minds Conference, see http://www.uoflnews.com/post/uofltoday/acc-students-bring-their-research-to-uofl-this-weekend-for-meeting-of-the-minds/

For information about the students and their cancer research projects, see http://louisville.edu/medicine/departments/pharmacology/research/nci-r25-cancer-education/student-trainee-cohorts-by-year

For information about the UofL Cancer Education Program, see http://louisville.edu/medicine/departments/pharmacology/research/nci-r25-cancer-education

 

Pharmacology and Toxicology PhD students receive major travel awards to present research

Haiyan Lu, Christine Kim and Rachel Speer each received major travel awards to present their research findings at the annual meetings of the Society of Toxicology held last month in Baltimore Maryland.

Haiyan Lu matriculated into the PhD program in pharmacology and toxicology via the PhD partnership with Wenzhou Medical University.  Haiyan is pursuing her PhD dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. John Wise, Sr.

Christine Kim and Rachel Speer are both PhD candidates in pharmacology and toxicology who have been awarded predoctoral fellowships on the NIEHS-funded training grant in environmental health sciences.   They are pursuing their PhD dissertation research in the laboratories of Drs. Brian Ceresa and John Wise Sr., respectively.

Haiyan Lu             Christine Kim        Rachel Speer