M.Ed. in Counseling & Personnel Services (Counseling Psychology)

If you are interested in the Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology please click here/

The Cardinal Success Program at the Nia Center was featured on WDRB news for its work in West Louisville. See the video and read the full story...

The MEd in Counseling and Personnel Services, with a concentration in Counseling Psychology, fulfills the state board of psychology's educational requirements to apply to sit for the exam to become a Psychological Associate.

Neftali Hernandez

The program here at UofL is both engaging and motivating. It is a tight-knit community where you learn from your cohort as well as professors who are personable and make it a point for you to succeed. I am glad I chose this program as I feel it has not only fully prepared me for the working world, but I have also made connections that will last a lifetime!

Neftali Hernandez, Counseling Psychology Graduate

Welcome to the Counseling Psychology Master’s program! The Counseling Program is grounded on the beliefs and principles fundamental to empowering and uplifting individuals, couples, families, and communities. Through theoretical and practice-based courses our students learn the foundations to be competent counseling psychological associates.

The program has many opportunities for our students:

  • All clinical experiences are conducted in community based settings, such as community mental health organization, in/out-patient hospitals, school-based settings, residential care facilities, and our own two training clinics.
  • All students receive supervision from Doctoral level Psychologists
  • Our program fulfills the KY State Board of Psychology’s educational requirements to sit for Psychological Associate exam.
  • We have day and evening classes to help meet the needs of working students. Many of our classes take place at our own two training clinics.
  • There are many opportunities to participate in research teams. For students who are looking to go on to a doctoral degree this experience will be invaluable.

The CPY is committed to social justice and diversity

The Counseling Psychology Program at the University of Louisville adheres to the values and ethics put forward by the American Psychological Association. Students are expected to adhere to the highest professional and ethical standards. Upon entry into the program students are expected to become familiar with the Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (2010) and the various guidelines published by APA (2003).

Respect for diversity and for values different from one's own is a central value of counseling psychology training programs. One way of how these values are manifested is in the form of the two training clinics that are part of the department of which the Counseling Psychology MEd program. Both clinics are located in traditionally underserved areas of Louisville. The Cardinal Success Program @ Shawnee (http://louisville.edu/education/cardinal-success) is a school-based training clinic which provides individual and group services to students, their families, and teachers at the Academy @ Shawnee. The training clinic at the Nia Center will open its doors before Fall 2015 and will provide services to the wider community. Beyond the services provided through the training clinics, many classes and significant parts of the research projects of faculty in the program and the department take place there. The valuing of diversity is also consistent with the profession of psychology as mandated by the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (2010) and as discussed in the Guidelines and Principles of Programs in Professional Psychology (APA, 2005). More recently there has been a call for counseling psychologists to actively work and advocate for social justice and prevent further oppression in society. Counseling psychologists provide services, teach, and/or engage in research with or pertaining to members of social groups that have often been devalued, viewed as deficient, or otherwise marginalized in the larger society.

Academic training programs, internships that employ counseling psychologists and espouse counseling values, and post-doc training programs (herein "training programs") in counseling psychology exist within multicultural communities that contain people of diverse racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds; national origins; religious, spiritual and political beliefs; physical abilities; ages; genders; gender identities, sexual orientations, and physical appearance. Counseling psychologists believe that training communities are enriched by members' openness to learning about others who are different than them as well as acceptance of others. Internship trainers, professors, practicum supervisors (herein "trainers") and students and interns (herein "trainees") agree to work together to create training environments that are characterized by respect, safety, and trust. Further, trainers and trainees are expected to be respectful and supportive of all individuals, including, but not limited to clients, staff, peers, and research participants.

Trainers recognize that no individual is completely free from all forms of bias and prejudice. Furthermore, it is expected that each training community will evidence a range of attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. Nonetheless, trainees and trainers in counseling psychology training programs are expected to be committed to the social values of respect for diversity, inclusion, and equity. Further, trainees and trainers are expected to be committed to critical thinking and the process of self-examination so that such prejudices or biases (and the assumptions on which they are based) may be evaluated in the light of available scientific data, standards of the profession, and traditions of cooperation and mutual respect. Thus, trainees and trainers are asked to demonstrate a genuine desire to examine their own attitudes, assumptions, behaviors, and values and to learn to work effectively with "cultural, individual, and role differences including those based on age, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language, and socioeconomic status" (APA Ethics Code, 2010, Principle E, p. 1063). Stated simply, both trainers and trainees are expected to demonstrate a willingness to examine their personal values, and to acquire and utilize professionally relevant knowledge and skills regardless of their beliefs, attitudes, and values.

Trainers will engage trainees in a manner inclusive and respectful of their multiple cultural identities. Trainers will examine their own biases and prejudices in the course of their interactions with trainees so as to model and facilitate this process for their trainees. Trainers will provide equal access, opportunity, and encouragement for trainees inclusive of their multiple cultural identities. Where appropriate, trainers will also model the processes of personal introspection in which they desire trainees to engage. As such, trainers will engage in and model appropriate self-disclosure and introspection with their trainees. This can include discussions about personal life experiences, attitudes, beliefs, opinions, feelings, and personal histories. Assuming no one is free from biases and prejudices, trainers will remain open to appropriate challenges from trainees to their held biases and prejudices. Trainers are committed to lifelong learning relative to multicultural competence. Counseling psychology training programs believe providing experiences that call for trainees to self-disclose and personally introspect about personal life experiences is an essential component of the training program. Specifically, while in the program trainees will be expected to engage in self-reflection and introspection on their attitudes, beliefs, opinions, feelings and personal history. Trainees will be expected to examine and attempt to resolve any of the above to eliminate potential negative impact on their ability to perform the functions of a psychologist, including but not limited to providing effective services to individuals from cultures and with beliefs different from their own and in accordance with APA guidelines and principles.

Our program is built with flexibility in mind. As many of our students work full- or part-time, we have different plans of study to meet your needs. Here are three examples of how students can complete the program. These are only examples, as each plan of study is individually tailored through meetings with faculty advisors to meet the needs of our students.

M.Ed. in Counseling and Personnel Services with a Specialty in Counseling Psychology (60 credit hours)

Course Prerequisites
If you do not have an undergraduate degree in Psychology, you must take "leveling courses" in abnormal psychology, social psychology, human development, and statistics/research design. These should be taken as soon as possible after admission according to the conditions stipulated in your letter of admission.

Further, certain courses in our program have prerequisites. These are:

ECPY 619 → ECPY 629 → ECPY 673 (counseling practicum)

ECPY 540 → ECPY 648 → ECPY 649 → ECPY 680 (assessment practicum)

ECPY 673 (counseling) → ECPY 683 (internship) / ECPY 680 (assessment practicum)

Two-Year Model for Students (Fall Start):

FallSpringSummer
ECPY 540
ECPY 619
ECPY 730
ECPY 629
ECPY 621
ECPY 775
ECPY 605
ECPY 650 or ELFH 664
ECPY 670
ELFH 600
FallSpringSummer
ECPY 673 (counseling)
ECPY 648
ECPY 663
Applied therapy elective
ECPY 680 (assessment)
ECPY 649
ECPY 611
Applied therapy elective
ECPY 683 (internship)
ELFH 601

Three-Year Model for Students (Fall Start):

FallSpringSummer
ECPY 540
ECPY 619
ECPY 629
ECPY 663
ECPY 730
ELFH 600
FallSpringSummer
ECPY 648
ECPY 605
ECPY 621
ECPY 611
ECPY 649
Applied therapy elective
ECPY 650 or ELFH 664
ECPY 670
FallSpringSummer
ECPY 673 (counseling)
Applied therapy elective
ECPY 680 (assessment)
ECPY 775
ECPY 683 (internship)
ELFH 601

Four-Year Model for Students (Fall Start):

FallSpringSummer
ECPY 619
ECPY 730
ECPY 629
ECPY 605
ELFH 600
FallSpringSummer
ECPY 621
ECPY 540
ECPY 663
ECPY 611
EECPY 670
FallSpringSummer
ECPY 648
ECPY 650 or ELFH 664
ECPY 649
Applied therapy elective
ELFH 601
FallSpringSummer
ECPY 673 (counseling)
Applied therapy elective
ECPY 680 (assessment)
ECPY 775
ECPY 683 (internship)

To complete the specialization in Counseling Psychology, you must complete a total of 600 hours of field work and 4 comprehensive psychological assessments in one counseling practicum (ECPY 673), one assessment practicum (ECPY680), and one counseling internship (ECPY 683). Two clinical field experiences cannot be taken in one semester. You must submit an application to be placed in practicum or internship (fall for spring placement, spring for summer or fall placement).

Degree Assessment: All program coursework with a 3.0 cumulative GPA.

Counseling Psychology

Initial Assessment: Admission to School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies & Counseling Psychology Program

General Requirements General Requirement: Undergraduate prerequisite: Degree in psychology or completion of 4 leveling courses. 1

Four-Year Model for Students (Fall Start):
Core Professional Area (total 30 hours)
ECPY 540 Evaluation & Measurement3
ECPY 605 Human Development3
ECPY 619 Empirical and Theoretical Foundations of Counseling & Psychotherapy3
ECPY 629 Theories and Techniques of Counseling & Psychotherapy3
ECPY 650 Group Process & Practice3
ECPY 663 Multicultural & Diversity Issues3
ECPY 670 Career Counseling3
ECPY 730 Social, Legal & Ethical Issues3
ELFH 600 Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics3
Mid-Point Assessment: Prior to ECPY 673 Practicum: Must complete ECPY 629 with at least a grade of "B".
ECPY 673 Practicum in Counseling Psychology 23
Counseling Psychology Concentration (total 24 hours)
ECPY 611 Learning Systems3
ECPY 621 Differential Diagnosis & Treatment in Counseling3
ECPY 648 Psychological Assessment I3
ECPY 649 Psychological Assessment II3
ECPY 680 Assessment Practicum 23
ECPY 683 Internship in Counseling Psychology 23
ECPY 775 Biological Bases of Behavior3
ELFH 601 Applied Statistics3
Professional Electives (6 hours)6
Minimum total hours:60

Degree Assessment: All program coursework with a 3.0 cumulative GPA.

1Students admitted to the Counseling Psychology Program who have not completed an undergraduate degree in psychology must complete four leveling courses in the areas of developmental psychology, abnormal psychology, social psychology, and statistics/research design for the social sciences.

2 At least 600 hours of field placement and four comprehensive psychological assessments must be completed during the two practicums and internship. No less than 10 and no more than 20 hours per week are required during the three field placements.

Note: Meeting GRE score and GPA minimums does not guarantee a student will be accepted to the program.

Admission Requirements

Prospective students must submit an online application for admission to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies.

  • The minimum requirement for admission is the baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from an accredited institution. Minimum overall GPA of 3.0, or 3.0 on the last 60 undergraduate hours, is required. Applicants are required to submit all official transcripts from all colleges attended as verification of coursework and degree(s).

    Applicants who have attended a college or university outside of the United States are also required to submit an evaluation of their transcript through either WES (World Education Services) or ECE (Educational Credential Evaluators). Please note that transcript evaluations can sometimes take several weeks.

    Please have transcripts sent to:
    School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies
    University of Louisville
    Louisville, KY 40292

    If transcripts are sent electronically,
    please have them sent to the following e-mail: gradadm @ louisville.edu

  • Each applicant is required to submit at least two letters of recommendation from individuals who can speak to the applicant's academic and/or professional capabilities and potential. Please download the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies recommendation form [PDF].
  • Submission of GRE scores is required. Preferred scores for the concentration in Counseling Psychology are the 40th percentile on the Verbal section and the 25th percentile on the Quantitative section. Students with GRE scores below the preferred scores may be admitted conditionally based upon the strength of the other components in their application package (undergraduate and graduate GPAs, letters of recommendation, professional goal statement, and work experience).
    Please note: when submitting GRE scores through ETS, have scores sent to the general University of Louisville code, 1838.
    Need help preparing for the GRE? Sign up for a GRE Information Session.
  • Prospective students must submit a professional goal statement [PDF] appropriate to their stated area of concentration for admission to the degree program. Please submit the cover sheet (see link) along with your goal statement.
  • The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of all foreign students from countries in which English is not the native language. Students holding a baccalaureate or advanced degree from an accredited institution in the United States are exempt from this requirement.

Faculty may require interviews in addition to written credentials as part of the admission process.

Karin Klein

I chose the program at UofL simply because it was more convenient for me and I wanted a program that worked with my schedule. I also like that the program is fairly small, which gives me the opportunity to get to know fellow students and really interact with them.

Karin Klein, Counseling Psychology Student

In addition, prospective students applying for a concentration in Counseling Psychology must provide evidence of having completed the following undergraduate coursework:

  • Abnormal Psychology
  • Statistics for social science
  • Lifespan development
  • Social psychology

Application Deadlines

Spring Term Admission: October 1

Fall Term Admission: March 1

If you have questions about applying to the program, please email gradadm@louisville.edu or call Education Advising and Student Services at 502-852-5597.

Contact

Learn more about our program faculty.

Kathryn Hopkins
Department of Counseling and Human Development
College of Education & Human Development
University of Louisville
Louisville, KY 40292
502-852-0632

Program Faculty

Our Faculty have years of experience teaching, practicing, and researching. Check out their bios to learn more about the faculty:

Careers & Preparing for Doctoral Programs

Graduates of the program find employment in various human service and counseling agencies including mental health agencies; residential treatment centers; family resource and youth service centers; hospitals; employee assistance programs; and career placement centers. Graduates perform a variety of job tasks including individual and group counseling and psychotherapy, psychological assessment, program development and consultation.

Some of our students elect to go onto further education. Doctoral programs in Counseling Psychology are a wonderful way to learn more about psychotherapy, prevention, social justice, supervision, and research. Many doctoral programs expect students to have a master's degree and experience with research. Our faculty are very open to including masters’ students on their research teams and to build the foundations to be a successful doctoral student.

Lindsey Felton

I really have enjoyed my time so far. The professors and advisors are extremely helpful.

Lindsey Felton, Counseling Psychology Student

Financial Aid

In addition to the financial aid opportunities offered by the University, the College of Education & Human Development also has information about financial aid.

Other financial aid opportunities available include graduate assistantships and other employment opportunities.

College of Education & Human Development scholarships

Of particular interest for many of the students in the Counseling Psychology MEd program are the College of Education & Human Development scholarships. While the number of available scholarships is limited, if awarded they may pay for tuition for classes during one semester (If your tuition is covered by other sources [grants, tuition remission, other scholarships] the award may not post to your account due to financial aid limits.). The scholarships are available three-times a year.

Spring Term Deadline: October 15
Fall Term Deadline: June 1
Summer Term Deadline: April 15

Students enrolled in our Counseling Psychology MEd program need to fulfill the following qualifications to be able to apply:

  • Be enrolled in 6 credit hours in the Counseling Psychology MEd program during summer
  • Have a GPA of 2.75 or higher
  • Complete online FAFSA form at www.fafsa.gov. Verification of Expected Family Contribution (EFC) will be obtained from the University of Louisville Financial Aid office.

An endorsement of faculty is not needed and the CEHD Honors and Scholarship Committee will make its decisions based on the provided information.

To apply, please fill out the online form found at https://louisville.edu/education/financialaid/cehd-scholarship/fg_base_view_p3.


I have some credit hours from another program/university. Can the credit be transferred?

Once you are admitted to the program, you may request to transfer up to 6 credit hours if your UofL advisor approves the request. Transfer requests are then submitted to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies.

What is the difference between Counseling Psychology and Mental Health Counseling?

The masters program in Counseling Psychology prepares a student to engage in the practice of psychology at the master's level. Students who complete the masters program in Counseling Psychology can apply to the Kentucky State Board of Psychology for the psychological associate license (Licensed Psychological Associate-LPA), which allows those credentialed as such to practice under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. The masters program in Counseling Psychology includes coursework and a practicum in psychological assessment that is not included in the masters program in Mental Health Counseling.

The masters program in Mental Health Counseling prepares a student to engage in the practice of professional counseling. Professional counselors typically seek membership in the American Counseling Associaton (ACA) and its state affiliates such as the Kentucky Counselors Association (KCA) and the American Mental Health Counseling Association (AMHCA) and its state affiliates such as the Kentucky Mental Health Counselors Association (KMHCA).