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Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them

Trees can play a huge role in the health of people living in cities, but across the country, cities are losing millions of trees year after year. And many poor urban neighborhoods — often home to a city's most vulnerable — are starting at a disadvantage.

Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them - Read More…

Green Heart Project plants 8,000 trees to study health effects

On Oct. 14 the University of Louisville’s Green Heart Project started planting 8,000 trees in South Louisville to study effects of plants on human health. This is one of the largest tree and shrub planting projects in U.S. history. “This is a Green Heart Project and in this project we are trying to study what effect vegetation and trees might have on the health of a community,” said Aruni Bhatnagar, director of the Christina Lee Brown Envirome Institute at U of L. “Our primary objective is to understand how increasing greeness effects the risk of heart disease in the community.”

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More trees, fewer health problems: Inside Green Heart Louisville’s five year study on air pollution control

Green Heart Louisville, a five-year project through UofL, wants to be a part of the solution, planting about 8,000 trees in South Louisville neighborhoods and studying their effect on residents’ health. Planting began Oct. 5 with the help of nonprofit Louisville Grows, which is canvassing and coordinating the planting of trees and shrubs on private, residential property.

More trees, fewer health problems: Inside Green Heart Louisville’s five year study on air pollution control - Read More…

Vaping Is Far From Harmless

While cigarettes generally produce a thousand times more carbonyls because of the combustion process, e-cigarettes produce a varying amount depending on the ratio of glycol to glycerin in the vaping fluid and how much of it is heated, says Daniel Conklin, an environmental cardiologist at the University of Louisville. Conklin has investigated how e-cigarettes might affect cardiovascular disease using a type of mouse bred with a disorder that mimics heart disease seen in humans. Acrolein is of particular concern because it is considered to be the main contributor to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease among cigarette smokers, he says.

Vaping Is Far From Harmless - Read More…

UofL E-Cigarette Research Shows Harm To Health

University of Louisville researchers are studying the effects of electronic cigarettes and hookahs on cardiovascular health. Cardiovascular researcher Daniel Conklin is leading this study. Conklin and his team have discovered in mice that there is a build up of plaque from exposure to e-cigs, resulting in an increased risk for cardiovascular issues.

UofL E-Cigarette Research Shows Harm To Health - Read More…

Experts Have a Warning For Kentucky’s Youth About Vaping Dangers

The number of young people in Kentucky using electronic cigarettes — vaping — is increasing, but health experts offered solutions as part of WFPL’s In Conversation Friday. Conklin said many young people don’t know how e-cigarettes affect their health. According to a study cited by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, the number of youth vaping in Kentucky doubled from 2016 to 2018 among 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th graders who were surveyed.

Experts Have a Warning For Kentucky’s Youth About Vaping Dangers - Read More…

June 18, 2019: Rep. Schiff On Iran; Effects Of Vaping On Cardiovascular Health

The use of vape pens, electronic cigarettes and other "electronic nicotine delivery systems" has exploded over the last decade or so, especially among teenagers. But compared with traditional cigarettes, there's very little research on the public health effects of this booming industry. Here & Now visits the lab of Dr. Daniel Conklin, an FDA-funded researcher at the University of Louisville who is studying the effects of vaping on cardiovascular health.

June 18, 2019: Rep. Schiff On Iran; Effects Of Vaping On Cardiovascular Health - Read More…

Vaping Could Cause Cardiovascular Harm, Researcher Says

San Francisco city supervisors will consider a ban Tuesday on the sale of electronic cigarettes in that city until the Food and Drug Administration completes its review of the devices. “Personally, I think anybody who sees the uptake of e-cigarettes amongst youth should be concerned about long-term consequences … because we just don’t know what the health risks are,” says Dr. Daniel Conklin, a University of Louisville Medical School professor and researcher studying the effects of vaping on the cardiovascular system.

Vaping Could Cause Cardiovascular Harm, Researcher Says - Read More…

Pushing the tobacco age to 21 is good, but it's not enough

It is universally acknowledged that smoking leads to premature disease and death. Yet, 1 billion people worldwide, including 38 million adults in the U.S. continue to smoke. It's not because they are oblivious to the dangers of smoking, but because their addiction smothers all prudent consideration of the adverse health effects of tobacco use. Most people become addicted to nicotine when they are teenagers. That's why it's imperative that we do all that we can to deter early nicotine addiction in youth. Initiatives to raise the national sales age for tobacco products to 21 deserve serious consideration by the Congress.

Pushing the tobacco age to 21 is good, but it's not enough - Read More…

Scientists Wanted: Recruited by Juul, Many Researchers Say No

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Alex Carll of the Envirome Institute was presenting his research about the impact of e-cigarette smoke on mouse hearts at an American Heart Association conference when a man from Juul Labs approached him and started asking questions.

Scientists Wanted: Recruited by Juul, Many Researchers Say No - Read More…

Study finds e-cig flavors can damage cardiovascular cells

E-cigarette flavors can damage the cells that line your blood vessels and perhaps your heart health down the line, according to a new study of human cells in the lab. The study, co-written by Dr. Aruni Bhatnagar, Director of the Envirome Institute at the University of Louisville, published Monday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, adds to growing evidence that the flavored "e-liquids" used in vapes can hinder human cells' ability to survive and function. The authors say these changes, some observed in the absence of nicotine, are known to play a role in heart disease.

Study finds e-cig flavors can damage cardiovascular cells - Read More…

FDA funds e-cigarette research at University of Louisville

There are a lot of questions when it comes to vaping and its health effects. The FDA funded research being conducted at UofL.

FDA funds e-cigarette research at University of Louisville - Read More…

DW's The Day with Drs Alex Carll and Aruni Bhatnagar

Smoking Kills - What About Vaping? E-cigarettes have been touted as a way to cut back on tobacco intake. "Vaping" as it's known is increasingly popular with smokers. But are e-cigarettes actually less harmful than the average tobacco product? DW's Sumi Somaskanda talks with Aruni Bhatnagar and Alex Carll, two experts on the effects of vaping.

DW's The Day with Drs Alex Carll and Aruni Bhatnagar - Read More…