Louisville Writing Project

Upcoming Seminars and Workshops

What is the Louisville Writing Project?

Jean Wolph

Jean Wolph is the Director of the Louisville Writing Project (LWP) and Instructor with the Department of Middle and Secondary Education. In 2016-17, LWP will celebrate its 35th year as a site of the National Writing Project (NWP) and partner to schools in the Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) and Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative (OVEC) districts.

Since LWP began, approximately 775 teachers have come to the University of Louisville to hone their skills as writing instructors in the LWP Summer Institute and to learn to be literacy leaders through their continued affiliation with the LWP Network.

LWP is co-sponsored by the Nystrand Center for Excellence in Education at the CEHD and by the Kentucky Department of Education. It is also an affiliate of the Kentucky Writing Project state network, and is one of nearly 200 NWP sites across the country.

The LWP site works with schools to provide and promote professional development in literacy for teachers of all grade levels and content areas. The Project is not just a summer opportunity. LWP also sponsors advanced institutes, study groups, demonstration sites, mini-conferences, teacher publications, and social events for our network members

Participants are also invited to continue their exploration of literacy by joining an LWP Rank I cohort. While earning the Rank I, teachers can continue the collegial relationships and spirit of inquiry begun during the institute.

LWP maintains an active schedule, logging over 13,000 contact hours during the last school year alone. Running 21 separate programs with a combined total of 132 activities allowed LWP to provide professional development to nearly 1,600 teachers from 89 Kentucky counties in 2014-15.

LWP featured in National Report

Jean Wolph, Director of LWP and Instructor in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education, Sandra Hogue, Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) Elementary Teacher, and Peter Reed, JCPS High School English Teacher, were among those featured in the National Writing Project’s (NWP) Annual report. NWP selected them due to their powerful and ongoing contributions both locally and nationally. Read the full report…

Read Peter's story…
Read Sandra's story…

What is the Purpose of the Project?

LWP

The Louisville Writing Project seeks to help improve the writing skills of students, Primary-College, through preparing teachers who then work with their own students and with other teachers during the following school year in their own and other schools. Goals for the Project include

  • improved writing skills among students
  • more comprehensive understanding among teachers of assessment methods, especially the use of portfolios
  • enhanced writing instruction at all levels in all subjects
  • greater utilization of teacher expertise in the teaching of writing
  • continuing communication between university faculty and teachers.

The NWP Approach

The National Writing Project is a program that is open to the best that is known about the teaching of writing from whatever source: from literature in the field, from research, and from the insights and experiences of successful teachers at all levels. The Writing Project proposes no packaged plans, no teacher-proof materials, no set formulae for teaching writing. We promote no single approach, though we favor a number of ideas that have emerged over the past decade, ideas now confirmed by more and more teachers. The National Writing Project remains open to discovery and qualification. This position is the sustaining strength of the Project.

Basic Assumptions of the National Project Model

  • Writing is fundamental to learning in all subject areas and at all grade levels. Summer Institutes therefore involve teachers from all disciplines and levels of instruction, primary through university.
  • As the process of writing can best be understood by engaging in this process, teachers of writing should write.
  • Teachers are the best teachers of teachers; successful practicing teachers have greater credibility with their colleagues than outside experts.
  • Real change in classroom practice happens over time. Working as partners, universities and schools can articulate and promote effective school reform.
  • Effective professional development programs are on-going and systematic, bringing teachers together regularly throughout their careers to examine successful practices and new developments (NWP, 1998).

Quotes from LWP Participants

Contact Us

For additional information or if you have any questions about the accuracy or currency of the information on this web page, contact:
Jean Wolph,
Program Director,
College of Education and Human Development
University of Louisville
Louisville, KY 40292
Phone: 502-852-4544