Student Handbook

Knowledge of Student Handbook

All students are charged with knowledge of the contents of this handbook and are responsible for complying with all of its requirements, rules and regulations. Students are also charged with knowledge of all information distributed by the Daily Docket; sent by mail to the student’s address on file with Student Records; sent to the student’s UofL e-mail address (or other email addresses students use in communicating with law school staff or faculty); and appearing in course notes, course schedules and registration materials.

While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and currency of the information in the Student Handbook and the other modes of communication referenced above, students should contact the Office of the Assistant Dean for Student Services for clarification in the rare event of ambiguities or discrepancies in distributed information.

This handbook was last revised in August 2016. It contains degree requirements, academic regulations, information regarding student rights, responsibilities and discipline, and student-related University policies. The faculty reserves the right to change requirements, regulations and procedures applicable to students.

The handbook has been prepared to help you understand the procedural aspects of the School of Law as well as the ethical obligations that bind law students. In order to maintain a level playing field in the interests of all, we try not to depart from the policies and procedures stated here. Exceptions are rare because procedural rules lose their force when they are disregarded arbitrarily or too often. For this reason, the burden of justifying an exception is on the individual seeking it. This may seem harsh, but it is essential if we are to be fair in treating all similarly situated students in a like manner.

It is also important to recognize the practice of law is a profession. Lawyers are governed by a professional code of ethics. A similar code—which is included as an Appendix to this handbook—applies to law students. From your first day here until you graduate, you should conduct yourself not only as a conscientious law student, but as a member of a learned profession.

During orientation’s oath signing ceremony, you recite the following:

I pledge, that as a student at the Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville, I will support and defend the Codes of Honor and Conduct of the Law School and the University. I will neither take part in academic dishonesty nor allow academic dishonesty to take place and should I be aware of any such practice, I will inform the Honor Council. Further, cognizant of the trust placed in me and the responsibility I carry as a student at the School of Law, I will conduct myself in all matters with courtesy, civility and professionalism. Finally, I will fully and conscientiously exercise the privileges given to me as a student of the law, to be prepared to assume my full responsibilities as a future member of the bar.

From the day you matriculate at Brandeis, you will be building the reputation that you will carry with you throughout your professional life. Remember that today’s classmates are tomorrow’s colleagues. We expect you to abide by this oath, the Honor Code and Code of Conduct throughout your tenure at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law.

This handbook is updated each academic year and occasionally during the school year if needed. Your graduation requirements are governed by the handbook published the year you entered Brandeis. If there are other policy changes during your law school tenure, you will be notified by publication in the Daily Docket.

Please familiarize yourself with the information in this Handbook. If you have questions, please feel free to contact the Office of the Assistant Dean for Student Services. This publication was prepared by the University of Louisville and printed with state funds pursuant to KRS 57.375. The University of Louisville is committed to and will provide equality of educational and employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, sex, age, color, national origin, ethnicity, creed, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, marital status, pregnancy, veteran status or political affiliation.

University of Louisville Mission Statement

The University of Louisville pursues excellence and inclusiveness in its work to educate and serve its community through:

  1. Teaching diverse undergraduate, graduate and professional students in order to develop engaged citizens, leaders, and scholars,
  2. Practicing and applying research, scholarship and creative activity, and
  3. Providing engaged service and outreach that improve the quality of life for local and global communities.

The University is committed to achieving preeminence as a nationally recognized metropolitan research university.

Accreditations

The University of Louisville is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, bachelor, master, specialist, doctoral and first professional degrees (D.M.D., J.D., M.D.). Individuals who wish to contact the Commission on Colleges regarding the accreditation status of the university may write the Commission at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4087, or call 404-679-4500.

Effective December 2016, UofL has been placed on probation for one year by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). The university remains fully accredited by SACSCOC while on probation. The probation focuses solely on issues related to the board governance of the institution and does not reflect on the quality of our academic or research missions.

For more information, see the university’s accreditation website.

The University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law is also accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA) and a member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS).

The faculty of the School of Law will recommend for the degree of Juris Doctor (JD) only those candidates who have complied with the following requirements:

In compliance with ABA Standard 310, “a law school shall adopt, publish, and adhere to written policies and procedures for determining the credit hours that it awards for coursework.”

A “credit hour” is an amount of work that reasonably approximates:

  1. not less than
    1. one 50-minute hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction, and
    2. two (60-minute) hours of out-of-class student work per week for fifteen weeks, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time
    for a total of 42.5 true hours (In a class with a final exam, the exam week can be counted as one of the fifteen weeks.) ; or
  2. an equivalent amount of work as required in subparagraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including
    1. simulation activities,
    2. field placements,
    3. clinical activities,
    4. co-curricular activities, and
    5. other academic work
    leading to the award of credit hours.
  3. Some classes/credits will require time keeping by the student.

Each Juris Doctor candidate must complete at least 90 semester hours of course work. In satisfying this requirement, students may apply no more than 25 total hours earned in the following courses:

  1. graduate courses in another college or school;
  2. externships;
  3. hours earned for extramural advocacy competitions;
  4. independent studies;
  5. hours earned for journal or law review; and
  6. Clinic II.

There are also specific maximum hours that can be applied to the degree from some of these activities, as described in Chapter 4, Part Y. (journals) Chapter 4, Part Z. (externships), Chapter 4, Part AA. (extramural advocacy), and Chapter 4, Part BB. (study abroad).

The American Bar Association (ABA) restricts number of credits which can be taken online or through distance education. No more than 15 credit hours may be taken through online or distance education. Consult the Assistant Dean for Student Services for details.

All students who began their work toward the JD at the Law School may earn no more than 30 credit hours towards the JD degree outside the Law School. This includes credit hours from foreign institutions, other ABA-approved law schools as a visiting student, and graduate-level courses taken outside the Law School. Transfer students (those who began their work toward the JD at another institution) must complete at least 30 of their last 36 credit hours at the University of Louisville, and all students must complete at least half of their 90 credit hours at the University of Louisville. No credit will be given toward a J.D. degree for coursework completed prior to matriculating to law school.

Attainment of a cumulative grade point average of at least C (2.0) in all graded courses taken, exclusive of courses transferred from other law schools, or taken in non-law graduate courses, is required for graduation. No grades from courses taken outside the law school will be counted toward a student’s law school grade point average or law school graduation honors.

All students must pass or satisfactorily complete the following:

  1. All required courses in the basic full-time curriculum (Lawyering Skills I and II, Civil Procedure, Contracts I and II, Criminal Law, Property1, Torts I and II; Professional Responsibility; and Constitutional Law I and II)2;
  2. At least one Perspective Course;
  3. The Public Service Requirement;
  4. The Upper Division Writing Requirement;
  5. At least 183 hours of "Core" Courses: Advanced Civil Procedure (last offering will be Fall 2017), Business Organizations, Criminal Procedure: Constitutional Issues, Criminal Procedure: Judicial Process, Decedents' Estates and Trusts, Family Law, Evidence and Secured Transactions;
  6. Professional Skills Instruction or Experiential Learning; and
  7. The Legal Profession Curriculum (effective 2011-12, updated in 2014-15).

NOTE: Courses satisfying the above requirements may be changed from time to time, and the faculty may impose additional requirements for graduation. Please refer to the Graduation Checklists for your entering year (ULink log-in required).

The first-year curriculum consists of the following courses:

Full-Time Program
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Lawyering Skills I (3) Lawyering Skills II (3)4
Contracts I (3) Contracts II (2)
Torts I (2) Torts II (3)
Civil Procedure (4) Constitutional Law I (4)
Criminal Law (3) Property (4)
Total Credits: 15 Total Credits: 16

Full-time students must take all of the listed courses during their first year. However, in extenuating circumstances, the Assistant Dean for Student Services may allow a full-time student to take fewer than all the listed courses in the spring term. If a student fails one or more of the first-year courses, he or she must retake it during the second year of school.

Part-Time Program
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Lawyering Skills I (3) Lawyering Skills II (3)
Contracts I (3) Contracts II (3)
Torts I (2) Torts II (3)
In addition, part-time students may take Criminal Law during the fall semester and/or Property during the spring semester with permission of the Assistant Dean for Student Services.
Criminal Law (3) Property (4)

The faculty strongly recommends that first year required courses be taken concurrently and in the order listed below:

First-Year Required Courses
Fall Semester Spring Semester
Lawyering Skills I Lawyering Skills II
Contracts I Contracts II
Torts I Torts II
Criminal Law Property
Civil Procedure Constitutional Law I

Part-time students must have taken or be currently enrolled in all first-year courses before taking upper –division courses. Students may, however, take other courses in any semester when there is no first-year course offered that the student is not currently taking or has not already passed. Any full- or part-time student who has not passed all first-year required courses must have his or her schedule approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Services.

A part-time student who completes the first part of a two-part first year course in the Fall semester (that is, Contracts and Torts) must enroll in the second part of that course the following spring term. A student who does not earn credit for the first part of a two-part course must still enroll in the second part of that course, but only if that student attended the required number of classes in the first part. However, if the student demonstrates compelling circumstances, the Assistant Dean for Student Services may make an exception to the rules set out in this paragraph.

First-year students, both full-time and part-time, may not drop a course once the semester has begun. If, however, a first-year student demonstrates, in a timely manner, compelling circumstances that require a course-load reduction, the Assistant Dean for Student Services may authorize an appropriate schedule adjustment if it is in the best interest of the student’s law school education. There is a presumption against course-load reduction in the first year of study, and in most circumstances the student seeking a course-load reduction will be advised to take a leave of absence from the School of Law.


1For students who matriculated prior to Fall 2012, Property I and Property II are required courses.

2For students who matriculated prior to Fall 2015, Basic Legal Skills, Legal Research, Civil Procedure I and II are required courses.

3Core course requirement reduced to 18 hours beginning with students matriculating Fall 2016; students who matriculated prior to Fall 2016 are required to take 24 hours of core courses.

4Beginning with Spring 2017, Lawyering Skills II will be 3 credits.

Model Plans

  1. To graduate in the traditional three-year program students will take in the first year: Lawyering Skills I and II; Contracts I and II; Torts I and II; Property; Civil Procedure; Constitutional Law I, and Criminal Law, leaving approximately 15 hours per semester to graduate in three years (excluding summers).
  2. To graduate in four years students will take in the first year: Lawyering Skills I and II; Contracts I and II; Torts I and II; Criminal Law and Property, leaving approximately 11-12 credit hours per semester to graduate in four years.
  3. To graduate in five years students will take in the first year: Lawyering Skills I and II; Contracts I and II; and Torts I and II, leaving approximately 9-10 credit hours per semester to graduate in five years.

Full-time students may take no more than 16 credit hours in any one semester. A full-time student may request a waiver to take up to 18 credits which must be approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Service prior to registration.

After their first year, part-time students may take as few as six (6) credit hours and as many as twelve (12) credit hours (thirteen (13) with permission of the Assistant Dean for Student Services), but all students must satisfy requirements for graduation within seven (7) years from their date of matriculation. The faculty strongly recommends that all students satisfy requirements for graduation within three (3) to five (5) years from their date of matriculation.

Students must complete the public service requirement prior to graduation by engaging in at least 30 hours of law-related public service at an approved placement. The public service requirement must be completed before a student will be permitted to visit at another law school during his or her last semester, unless an exception is pre-approved by the Public Service Coordinator. Failure to complete the public service hours and/or failure to submit all required documentation by the published deadline will result in delayed graduation.

For purposes of the public service program, public service work is broadly defined as follows:

  1. Primarily, for persons of limited means or for charitable, religious, civic, community, governmental and education organizations in matters which are designed generally to address the needs of persons of limited means and for governmental organizations in matters in furtherance of their organizational purposes.
  2. Secondarily, for groups or organizations seeking to secure or protect civil rights, civil liberties, animals, the environment, or public rights; or
  3. In special cases (not routine clerk work), in activities for improving the law, the legal system, or the legal profession, or educating the public about the law and the legal system.

Furthermore, the volunteer service must be unpaid, not for academic credit, and involve law-related work at an approved placement. No public service work credit will be received by a student who is currently in a paid employment relationship with the placement.

All students must complete a substantial writing project after completing 19 hours or more of course work. The writing requirement may be fulfilled by writing:

  1. A research paper for a writing seminar, involving significant legal research, organization, and analysis; or
  2. A note involving significant legal research, organization, and analysis and capable of being published for the University of Louisville Law Review, the Journal of Law and Education, or the Journal of Animal and Environmental Law; or
  3. A note or comment accepted for publication in another law review and certified by the Assistant Dean for Student Services as involving significant legal research, organization, and analysis and as meeting the writing requirement; or
  4. Appellate briefs, trial court memoranda, or inter-office memoranda that involve significant legal research, organization, and analysis, in a course or seminar.

Other than as specified in item 4 above, drafting documents, such as complaints, depositions, trial memoranda, or estate plans, will not fulfill the writing requirement. Additionally, independent study papers or papers in courses other than a writing seminar will not fulfill the writing requirement.

With respect to seminar papers or course work in fulfillment of the writing requirement:

  1. To ensure that the topic of the paper provides an opportunity for substantial research, the faculty should either choose the topic or be actively involved in the choice of a topic;
  2. To provide for an adequate educational experience, the student shall submit a draft of the paper which shall be reviewed by the faculty, whereupon a consultation between the faculty and the student shall be scheduled in which the draft is reviewed and suggestions for improvements made;
  3. The paper must not have been used in a previous course nor have been prepared for publication in a law review; and
  4. To meet the writing requirement, a paper must be at least 6,250 words in length, exclusive of footnotes or endnotes, and must be supported by footnotes, endnotes, or other appropriate citation of authority. A paper submitted in a seminar, as well as one submitted for journal publication, must be typed.
  5. The faculty member supervising the fulfillment of the writing requirement shall submit to the Student Records Office at the end of each semester the names of the persons who have fulfilled the writing requirement. A writing shall not satisfy the writing requirement unless the supervisor awards it a grade of "C" or higher. The Student Records Office shall note the fulfillment of the writing requirement.

All students who matriculated prior to Fall 2016 must complete a substantial skills experience after completing 19 hours or more of course work.

  1. The skills requirement may be fulfilled by successful completion of a course, seminar, clinic, extramural advocacy competition or externship designated as a “skills” experience by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Work done in satisfaction of the Public Service graduation requirement may not satisfy the Skills requirement.
  2. Courses, seminars, extramural advocacy competitions and externships designated as “skills experiences” shall be those which provide substantial instruction in professional lawyering skills. Such skills may include trial and appellate advocacy, dispute resolution, counseling, interviewing, negotiating, problem solving, factual investigation, organization and management of legal work, drafting, or other professional lawyering skills.
  3. A student may not satisfy the skills requirement during the same course or seminar in which the student satisfies the upper division writing requirement or the perspective requirement. If the satisfaction of the skills requirement involves the production of written work product, that written work product must not be submitted for credit in any other course or seminar or in satisfaction of any other requirement of the School of Law.
  4. To satisfy the skills requirement, the course, seminar, externship or clinic shall contain the equivalent of at least one (1) credit hour of skills training and the student's performance of those skills must be assessed by the instructor or supervisor as part of the experience. Assessment will include substantial, documented feedback to the student regarding the quality of the student’s performance and opportunity, as appropriate, to improve the student’s skills performance in the course of the experience.
  5. The faculty member supervising the fulfillment of the skills requirement shall submit to the Student Records Office at the end of each semester the names of the persons who have fulfilled the skills requirement and the grades earned by each student. A student shall not satisfy the skills requirement in a graded course unless the student earns a grade of "C" or higher in the course, or in a pass/fail course unless the student receives a grade of “pass.” The Student Records Office shall note the fulfillment of the skills requirement on each student's academic record.
  6. Effective date: The Professional Skills Requirement shall apply to all students entering the Law School in the fall semester 2009 through Spring 2016.

All students beginning Law School in the Fall 2016 and later must complete one or more experiential course(s) totaling at least six credit hours (replacing the Professional Skills Requirement). An experiential course is a simulation course, a law clinic, or a field placement. The Law School will identify courses that satisfy this requirement on the course schedule.

Students must successfully complete one perspective course in order to graduate. A perspective course gives systematic, pervasive, and in-depth analysis of legal issues and institutions from one or more vantage points (perspectives) outside of society’s current lawmakers in one of three categories:

  1. Perspectives from legal systems outside the domestic U.S. legal system (e.g., international law or comparative law perspectives);
  2. Perspectives from people and groups who are not lawmakers, often critical perspectives on dominant U.S. legal institutions (e.g., critical race perspectives; gender perspectives); and
  3. Perspectives from non-legal disciplines (e.g., economic analysis of law; legal history).

A course meeting the perspective course requirement may be one designated by the faculty because of its course description and inherent content, or may be a particular offering of a course designated by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. A course must be at least two credit hours to satisfy the perspective requirement. Courses meeting the perspective requirement are designated on the class schedule every semester.

A student must complete his or her course of study no sooner than 24 months and not longer than 84 months after a student has commenced law study at the School of Law or a law school from which the School has accepted transfer credit. Ordinarily, a full-time law student will complete his or her degree in three academic years, and the part-time student in four or five years. The School of Law discourages the acceleration of completion of requirements for graduation.

At the beginning of the semester or summer session in which a student expects to graduate, the candidate for the degree must fill out a degree application online. The degree application process will be available on the Web through ULink. All candidates for degrees, whether or not participating in Commencement, must apply for degrees according to the deadlines published by the University.

The School of Law grade point average and honors are based on grades received at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law only. Grades received from schools outside the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law are not included in a student’s Law School grade point average. This includes other University of Louisville colleges, other ABA approved law schools, or study-abroad programs, and courses taken in other schools as part of a dual degree program.

  1. CALI Awards. CALI awards are given each semester to the student or students who receive the highest grade in a letter-graded course. Once grades are received, students who will receive CALIs will be notified by the Assistant Dean for Student Services. The Assistant Dean will enter names each semester into the CALI database. Certificates will be distributed when they are received by the Assistant Dean.
  2. Dean’s List. All full-time and part-time students who complete 8 or more graded credits in a semester at Brandeis School of Law will be awarded Dean’s List recognition for each semester his/her semester grade point average is in the top 20% of his/her respective class. Dean’s List students will receive a letter from the Dean of Brandeis 4-6 weeks after grades are posted for the semester and each semester recipient names will be posted within the Law School (unless the student has opted out of publication). It is not based on cumulative grade point average, only semester grade point average.
  3. Graduation Latin Honors. The degree of JD will be granted summa cum laude to those who have a point standing between 3.8 and 4.0, magna cum laude to those who have a point standing between 3.5 and 3.799, and cum laude to those who have a point standing between 3.2 and 3.499. Grade point average for graduation honors are based on the student’s cumulative grade point average after his or her penultimate semester. Diploma honors are based on final cumulative grade point average.
  4. Honor Societies. The University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law recognizes students who have excelled by offering honor society membership in one of three organizations, as well as with an Outstanding Graduating Senior Award.
    1. Brandeis Honor Society. In 1977, the faculty approved the establishment of a society to honor students with outstanding scholastic records at the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law. The Brandeis Society is an honorary scholastic society made up of law students who assist the Office of the Dean in encouraging legal scholarship. The Brandeis Society was created to foster a spirit of careful study at the University of Louisville School of Law and to mark in a fitting manner those who have attained a high grade of scholarship. Members of the Society are known as Brandeis Scholars. Students are eligible for membership if they rank within the top 5 percent of the 2L class or 10 percent of the 3L class. After each Spring semester, the Director of Student Records will forward a list of eligible 2Ls to the Dean for review. After each Fall semester, the Director of Student Records will forward a list of eligible 3Ls to the Dean for review. The Dean will make the final decision and will invite eligible students to be part of the Society.
    2. Brandeis Inn of Court. American Inns of Court are designed to promote professional skills and values, with a special emphasis upon ethical and responsible advocacy in state and federal courts. Each Inn consists of distinguished members of the bench and bar, as well as a limited number of carefully selected students. This selection is based upon demonstrated interest in advocacy and student leadership or academic record. Nominations are put forward by the dean from eligible students in their final year of law school.
    3. Phi Kappa Phi—university honor society. Any graduate student of sound character who is a candidate for an advanced degree, who has been registered as a graduate student in that institution for at least one year, and who has made a noteworthy record in his graduate work; except that a candidate for an advanced degree who has not completed a full year's residence shall be eligible for election within a period of one month prior to his final examinations for the degree and except further that any former graduate student who has been awarded an advanced degree subsequent to the last previous election of members in that Chapter shall be eligible for election; provided, however, that the number of graduate students elected in any year shall not exceed one-tenth the number of such students eligible for consideration during that year.

      No student can be nominated to Phi Kappa Phi who is not in the top 10 percent of the class. This requirement is enforced by the National Office of Phi Kappa Phi and is a term and condition of our charter.

    4. Omicron Delta Kappa—university honor society. Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) is a national leadership honor society which strives to recognize students for their achievements in scholarship, athletics, community service, civic engagement, publications, and creative and performing arts. Each spring, the Beta Epsilon Circle at the University of Louisville presents one graduating senior from each college with the ODK Outstanding Graduating Senior Award. This honor is presented to an individual or individuals who, by reason of high scholarship, prominent leadership, and service to the University. Students selected are considered outstanding students in their graduating class.
    5. Outstanding Graduating Senior. This is a campus-wide award for students in each unit. The graduate selected should exemplify the attributes the Law School deem most desirable, including character, leadership, service, and scholarship. The student will carry the law banner at the campus commencement ceremony in May each year and will receive the framed Oath from the year they began at Brandeis.

In recognition of the interdisciplinary nature of law, the law school offers a number of dual degree programs providing students an opportunity to earn two degrees in a reduced period of time. Students interested in any of these programs should consult the Assistant Dean for Student Services.

Generally, law students must apply to a dual degree program prior to completing 45 hours of law school course work. Applicants must be admitted independently to both schools and must be accepted for the dual degree program by both schools. The JD degree will not be awarded before the other degree. Students must complete the requirements for both degrees before the JD is awarded. No credit will be given toward a J.D. degree for coursework completed prior to matriculating to law school. Further, in the first year of law study, the participating student must take law classes only.

The Assistant Dean for Student Services or the Assistant Dean’s delegate must approve dual degree students’ course schedules each semester. Additionally, if a student withdraws from the dual degree program, the student may not use courses earned in the second degree towards the completion of the JD. All credits transferred into the JD program from a dual degree program will be as credits only, and will not count toward the student’s law school grade point average or graduation honors.

For additional information on dual degrees, please contact the Assistant Dean for Student Services.

Section 1. Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Bioethics and Medical Humanities

Section 2. Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Humanities

Section 3. Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Political Science

Section 4. Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration

Section 5. Juris Doctor/Master of Divinity

Section 6. Juris Doctor/Master of Public Administration

Section 7. Juris Doctor/Master of Science in Social Work

Section 8. Juris Doctor/Master of Urban Planning

The Law School believes that some students may benefit by taking courses offered in departments other than the Law School. Such courses may be taken in accordance with the following guidelines:

  1. The course offered outside the law school must be one offered at the graduate or professional level and must enhance the student’s legal education.
  2. Special ABA restrictions apply to online courses. Consult the Assistant Dean for Student Services for details.
  3. The instructor and department for the course must agree to the participation of the law student before the student may register for the course.
  4. To be applied as credit for the student’s JD, the student must earn at least a B for the course. The grade will not count toward the student’s law school grade point average or graduation honors.
  5. The law student must not be on probation during the semester in which the graduate credit is earned.
  6. The law student may apply up to six hours of credit toward the JD under this policy.
  7. Prior to registration, the law student must submit to the Assistant Dean for Student Services the official description of the course along with a written statement describing why the student believes the course would benefit him/her.
  8. The law student must obtain the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Services before the student may register for the course. The administration of the law school may exercise its discretion in determining the propriety of the course for the law student’s course of study.
  9. This policy does not apply to the law student who is participating in a dual degree program. Such a student may not use this policy to take courses offered by other departments and which would be in addition to the courses required as part of the dual degree program. Students who withdraw from a dual degree program may not use this policy to apply towards graduation the courses already taken in the other department.
  10. The student must earn at least 19 credits from the law school before taking an outside course.

As soon as possible after deciding to study law, a student is urged to investigate the rules governing admission to the bar in the state in which he or she intends to practice. The rules of many states require registration upon beginning the study of law. Compliance with bar admission requirements is the sole responsibility of the student.

NOTE: Any applicant who plans to sit for the Kentucky bar must have passed the multistate professional responsibility exam before sitting for the Kentucky bar. Information regarding the Kentucky Bar Examination may be obtained from the Kentucky Office of Bar Admissions, Suite X, 1510 Newtown Pike, Lexington, KY 40511. See Supreme Court Rule 2.014 for further details. If you plan to take the bar in another jurisdiction, contact information for all states is also available.

Beginning in the 2012-13 academic year, student enrollment in classes is also subject to rules governing pace of study and maximum time frame for graduation. These rules are imposed by the University, not the Law School. They affect only the student’s eligibility for financial aid, not eligibility for a law degree.

  1. Pace. Students must successfully complete at least two-thirds of the cumulative credit hours in which they enroll.
  2. Maximum time frame. Students must complete their degree requirements by enrolling in no more than 135 total hours at the Law School.
  3. A student who signs up for a class, but drops that class on or before the last day to add a class, is not deemed “enrolled” in a class. A student who drops a class after that date is considered enrolled in the class for purposes of this Part.
  4. A student who fails to meet either the pace or the maximum time frame requirements will no longer qualify for federally guaranteed financial aid. The Law School will report all students who fail to meet the requirements to the University Financial Aid Office. A student may be able to restore his or her eligibility for financial aid through the Financial Aid Office’s internal appeals process.
  5. The University also requires annual reporting of all students who fail to remain in good standing, as defined in Chapter 4.Part B. Students who are not in good standing may also lose financial aid. The Law School Reinstatement and Probation mechanism serves as the appeal mechanism for students who fail to maintain good standing. If the student is allowed to continue as a law student, he or she will not lose eligibility for federal financial aid.
  1. No credit is given for work done in absentia. However, with the prior approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Services, a student may take a limited number of course hours at another ABA approved law school and receive credit toward graduation from the School of Law. A student will only receive credit for courses approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Services and in which a grade of C or higher is earned. The grades received at another law school will not be included in the law school grade point calculation or towards graduation honors.
  2. Unless explicitly authorized by the Assistant Dean for Student Services, (a) no full-time student will be permitted to register for more than 16 credit hours per semester (8 credit hours in the summer term), and (b) no part-time student will be permitted to register for more than 12 credit hours per semester (6 credit hours in the summer term). With permission of the Assistant Dean for Student Services, a full-time student may register for a maximum of 18 credit hours and a part-time student may register for a maximum of 13 credit hours. As used in this section, “credit hours” includes all classes the student takes at the University of Louisville, regardless of whether the credit will be applied toward the student’s degree. Skills competitions and journal credit also count as hours in this calculation.
  3. After the first year, any student enrolled must take a minimum of six credit hours per semester. Any student enrolled in more than thirteen (13) credit hours in any semester shall be considered a full-time student.
  4. Students enrolled in the School of Law are not permitted to enroll in any other college or school of this University or in any other institution of learning without the consent of the Assistant Dean for Student Services.
  5. All beginning students, both full- and part-time, must take the complement of first-year courses prescribed by the faculty, as set out in Chapter 3, Part C.
  6. No credit will be given toward a J.D. degree for coursework completed prior to matriculating to law school.
  1. Any student whose cumulative grade point average at the end of any semester is 2.0 or better on a 4-point scale shall be in good standing.
  2. Any student whose cumulative grade point average at the end of any semester is less than 2.0 shall be placed on probation for one semester. Any student on probation may not enroll in a seminar or independent study.
  3. A student placed on probation as a result of prior grades may attend summer school immediately after being placed on probation, but that summer semester is not the equivalent of the “probation semester.” Grades earned during that summer semester while on probation are part of the student’s cumulative GPA, which must be equal to a 2.0 or better at the end of the fall or spring probation semester.
  4. Within 30 days of the beginning of the semester in which the student is on probation, the student may petition the Reinstatement and Probation Committee for a second semester on probation. A second semester of probation shall not be granted unless the Committee finds that compelling reasons justify a second semester of probation and there is a substantial likelihood that the student's quality point deficiency could be removed with two semesters of probation. The content of any such petition filed after the 30-day period is limited to compelling reasons which have occurred subsequent to the filing of the first petition or the expiration of the 30-day period, whichever is applicable.
  5. Except as is provided in Rule 6 below, any student who does not remove the quality-point deficiency in the probation semester(s) shall be dismissed. A student who is granted a second semester of probation pursuant to paragraph 4, but does not remove the quality point deficiency as required by the Committee in the probation semester(s) shall be ineligible for readmission.
  6. Any first-year student placed on probation at the end of his or her first semester who attains better than a 2.0 semester average during the next semester in which enrolled but who fails to remove all quality point deficiency during that semester shall be granted an expedited hearing before the Reinstatement and Probation Committee. The student shall be continued on probation for one additional semester if, in the Committee's opinion, there is a strong prospect that the student will be able to remove all quality point deficiencies by the end of the third semester of enrollment. Should such student fail to remove all quality point deficiency and attain the status of a student in good standing by the end of the third semester of enrollment, the student shall be dismissed from the School of Law and shall be ineligible for readmission.
  7. Any student on probation shall register for a full load of classes as defined by the rules of the School of Law. (See Procedural Rules for the Reinstatement and Probation Committee.) A part-time first year student may not add Property, Constitutional Law I (or any other four credit hour course) in the spring semester of his or her first year unless he or she is in good academic standing.
  8. Any student on probation who fails to register or withdraws without a leave of absence shall be dismissed from the School of Law.

The Reinstatement and Probation Committee shall have jurisdiction and final authority over all reinstatement petitions. The Committee is authorized to grant or deny relief incident to reinstatement, including extension of time to complete studies for the JD degree. In extraordinary circumstances, the committee may grant academic bankruptcy for one semester to any first-year student dismissed at the end of his or her first year. The Committee shall not have the power to change or eliminate grades. A student who is granted academic bankruptcy is not thereafter eligible to appeal for an additional semester of probation if he or she fails to obtain a cumulative GPA of better than 2.0.

Appeal to the Reinstatement and Probation Committee

  1. Every student who has been dismissed for academic reasons shall have a right to appeal, which appeal shall be taken to the Reinstatement and Probation Committee. The decision of that Committee shall be final.
  2. No student dismissed shall be readmitted unless the Reinstatement and Probation Committee shall find that compelling reasons justify his or her readmission. Students dismissed will not ordinarily be readmitted to the school. Any student seeking readmission shall present to the Reinstatement and Probation Committee clear and convincing evidence that the difficulty which led to dismissal has been eliminated. The Reinstatement and Probation Committee may set whatever conditions it considers appropriate on readmission, provided that the committee shall not allow any readmitted student more than two semesters to remove any grade point deficiency. (See Dismissal and the Procedural Rules for the Reinstatement and Probation Committee, available from the Student Records Office.)

The following advising and course enrollment conditions apply to students with a cumulative grade point average below a 2.5, or who fall within the bottom quartile of their class as designated by the Assistant Dean of Student Services, at the end of any semester.

  1. Course Enrollment. In each semester that a student meets the advising criteria above, the student is restricted in his/her course enrollment for the next semester as follows:

    1. Students taking 10 or more credit hours must register for a minimum of two core courses.
    2. Students taking fewer than 10 credit hours must register for a minimum of one core course.

    Core courses include: Administrative Law; Advanced Civil Procedure; Business Organizations; Criminal Procedure: Constitutional Issues; Criminal Procedure: Judicial Process; Decedents Estates and Trusts; Estate & Gift Taxation; Evidence; Family Law; Federal Income Taxation of Individuals; Negotiable Instruments; Secured Transactions; or other approved state bar course.

  2. Advising. Students meeting the advising criteria who are not in their final semester of law study must meet at least three (3) times per semester with an advisor as assigned by the Assistant Dean for Student Services. Students are required to meet with their assigned advisor before registering for courses for the next semester and must complete an advising form in advance of the meeting as a condition of registering for classes.
  3. Advising Guidelines. Students are expected to work with their advisor to develop an individualized academic achievement plan addressing appropriate study strategies, time management skills, and exam-taking techniques. Students should discuss with their advisor whether holding elected or appointed office in any student organization, registering for seminars and/or externships, or involvement in other extra-curricular activities will work to achieve an appropriate balance between academic success and professional development.
  4. Failure of a student to comply with any of the conditions will result in a notation made in the student’s record.

Students with a cumulative grade point average below a 2.0 are not in good academic standing. In addition to the restrictions set forth above, the following restrictions shall apply:

  1. Course Enrollment. In each semester a student is not in good academic standing, the student is restricted from enrolling in seminars, externships, or independent studies.) A part-time first year student on probation may not add Property or Constitutional Law (or any other four credit course) in the spring semester of his or her first year.
  2. Student Organizations. Students who are not in good academic standing shall not hold any elected or appointed office in any student organization, including the Student Bar Association and Honor Council. If such a position is already held by a student when his or her cumulative grade point average drops below a 2.0, the student shall resign such position(s) immediately.
  1. In order to receive credit in any course, the student must attain a grade not lower than "D-". Credit will not be given for any course unless the examination or other evaluative mechanism is passed. (Special rules apply to the writing requirement, the skills requirement, pass/fail courses, courses taken at other law schools, and graduate courses taken in other units of the University).
  2. Students are not permitted to take examinations in courses for which they have not registered.
  3. Students may take exams only in authorized locations. The faculty policy regarding in-class examinations is as follows:
    1. In order to avoid any appearance of impropriety, all in-class exams, unless otherwise specified by the faculty teaching the class, must be taken in the classrooms of the School of Law or other specially designated computer rooms. A student who is taking an exam in an approved alternate location may close the door.
    2. All other areas of the school, including but not limited to the library, student offices, restrooms, and faculty offices should not be used to take in-class exams. Under special circumstances, including without limitation accommodated exams, the Assistant Dean for Student Services may authorize a student to take an exam in an area not normally permitted.
  4. If sickness or other adjudged good cause results in a student's failure to take the regularly scheduled examination in any subject, the student must contact the Assistant Dean for Student Services as soon as possible. The Assistant Dean may authorize a make-up examination during the regularly scheduled exam period, or in exceptional circumstances, after the exam period. All make-up exams and incomplete or deferred grades must be approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Services by the last day of class for the applicable semester, except when the basis for the request occurs later, e.g., illness on the day of the exam.
  5. A student has an exam conflict and may reschedule an exam if he or she has more than one examination scheduled to begin within 12 hours of another exam, or if the student has an exam at 6:00 p.m. with another exam the next morning at 9:00 a.m. Three exams in three days do not qualify as a conflict. In the event of an “exam conflict,” the student shall take the make-up at the next available make-up session that does not create another conflict. All rescheduled and make-up examinations must be approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Services. If a professor and student want to schedule a make-up exam on a day other than the make-up day, they may do so with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Services only after the Assistant Dean for Student Services has determined that there is an exam conflict. In such event, the make-up exam may not be given before the regularly scheduled exam and it must be administered by the faculty member. The Student Records Office will administer make-up exams that are scheduled on the regular make-up days.
  6. Make-up examinations must be scheduled after the regular examination date. In no event will a student be permitted to take a make-up examination prior to the regular examination time as reflected in the examination schedule. Because of our exam software license, the School of Law cannot guarantee students scheduling make-up exams beyond the official examination period will be able to use computers to take those exams. Please consult with the Assistant Dean for Student Services.
  1. The maximum elapsed time permitted between first matriculation and graduation, including, but not limited to, any time spent on leave of absence, shall be eighty-four (84) months. A student who does not remain continuously enrolled, excluding summers, must obtain a leave of absence in order to return to the School of Law. The faculty of the School of Law reserves the right to change the schedule of classes, the program of instruction, the requirements for degrees, and any other similar rules or regulations.
  2. Leaves of absences are granted for extraordinary circumstances and must be approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Services.
  3. A student on probation who takes a leave of absence will remain on probation when he or she returns from leave.
  4. The student taking leave must petition the Registrar’s Office for any tuition refund that requires an exception to the Tuition Reduction Deadline.
  5. The student taking leave must understand the leave’s impact on loans, financial aid, and scholarships. For further information, the student is advised to consult the Financial Aid Office.
  6. School of Law scholarships do not automatically renew for a student who takes a leave. In addition, in most instances, a student taking a leave must repay any scholarship money awarded by the Law School during the semester(s) in which the student is on leave. The student must submit a “Petition for Continuation of School of Law Scholarship” form no later than one week after approval of his or her leave of absence.

Examination booklets and papers are retained by faculty for one (1) year. Students are encouraged to seek review of their examinations in a timely manner. No grade may be changed after the earlier of (a) one year after it is released, or (b) the JD degree has been posted on the student’s transcript, unless such change is the result of an Honor Code proceeding.

The School of Law maintains records on each student. These begin with the student’s application and supporting materials and also include the student’s transcript. Other documents relating to the student’s education here (e.g., letters of recommendation requested from a member of the faculty; records of disciplinary proceedings; notations of awards or commendations, etc.) may also be included. It is our policy to safeguard the privacy of these records in accordance with University regulations and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

Each year, the University provides an annual announcement to notify current students of their FERPA rights. The announcement is published in the Schedule of Courses, in The Cardinal, and on the University of Louisville’s FERPA Information website. This notice will explain the basis on which faculty and other law school personnel may seek and obtain access to student records.

Each semester, awards and other academic recognitions will be published within the Law School community. A student must complete a Request to Withhold Disclosure of Directory Information if he or she does not want his or her name published.

The School of Law encourages students to familiarize themselves with these policies. Also see Appendix 7.

The right to take examinations, as well as the privilege of continuing as a student in the School of Law, is conditioned on regular attendance and satisfactory participation in class work. Unsatisfactory attendance or unsatisfactory classroom performance may result in lowering of your final grade for the course, involuntary withdrawal from the course, failing the course, or other resolution. There are no excused absences, except as provided by University policy. For information concerning religious holidays, see Chapter 3, Part K, below. For information concerning excused absences for participation in University sanctioned events, see the University Classroom Policies.

  1. In two-, three-, or four-hour courses, three absences will be permitted each semester. In one-hour courses, only two absences will be permitted each semester. This includes Lawyering Skills which is three credit hours in the fall and three credit hours in the spring.
  2. Notwithstanding the above general rule: in courses that meet only once a week, a student may have no more than two absences.
  3. Regular and punctual attendance is also required in externship and clinical courses. Participation in an externship or clinical program is a professional commitment. All students are expected to adhere to a high standard of responsibility, competence, and dedication with regard to all work assigned. Unsatisfactory attendance or lack of professionalism, civility, or respect for your colleagues or supervising attorney may result in lowering of your final grade, involuntary withdrawal from the course, failing the course, or other resolution.
  4. When a student has three absences (or two in a one-hour course or two in a course that meets only once a week), the Professor will notify the Assistant Dean for Student Services who will take appropriate action.
  5. In a course where a professor cancels and reschedules more than one class, a student should not be counted as absent if he or she does not attend the rescheduled classes.

Federal law and University policy prohibit discrimination on the basis of religious belief. Students who observe work-restricted religious holidays must be allowed to do so without jeopardizing their academic standing in any course. Faculty are obliged to accommodate students’ requests for adjustments in course work on the grounds of religious observance, provided that the students make requests in writing during the first two weeks of the term. Deans and department chairs must investigate and resolve student complaints arising from alleged faculty failure to make reasonable accommodation under these guidelines. Note: A calendar of typical work-restricted holidays is available on the University’s Work Restricted Holy Day Policies and Calendar. Information about specific holidays is also available by phone from the Office of the Provost at 852-6153.

The law school offers a rigorous program of legal education that prepares students, upon graduation, for admission to the bar and for effective, ethical, and responsible participation as members of the legal profession. Achieving these objectives requires students to make a significant commitment of time to law school course work. For every credit hour earned, the School of Law expects students to devote at least three to four hours per week on course work (assuming the work is spread over a 14 week period). Devoting the expected hours to course work is integral to solid professional formation.

Students should not allow employment to undermine their professional formation. The following policies are designed to help students maintain an appropriate balance between course work and employment. Students who need financial assistance should seek a loan or a scholarship rather than impair the quality of their law school experience.

20-Hour Policy. It is the policy of the law school to prohibit a student from working for compensation in excess of twenty (20) hours per week during any week of a semester in which the student is participating in law school courses as a full-time student. A full-time student is a student enrolled in twelve (12) or more credit hours of courses at the University of Louisville (including all courses, regardless of whether the credit will be applied to the student’s law degree).

First Year Students. Because the first year presents demands and methods of study which most first year students have not experienced, it is strongly recommended that first-year students not engage in outside employment. For those students who find it necessary to work, the part-time program has been provided. There the course load has been reduced in order to permit the students to divide their time between the study of law and their employment. Part-time students are encouraged to inform their employers of their class schedules and that they are obligated to attend law school classes during these times throughout the academic semester. Students occasionally will be required to attend other special classes, meetings, or programs and must be able to take off work or otherwise make arrangements to attend these functions.

Upper Level Students. After the first year, some work in legal practice settings may help students develop skills and values needed for competent and ethical participation as a member of the legal profession. Nonetheless, appropriate attention to law school course work requires a commitment of time that effectively precludes substantial employment for full-time students. For example, a student earning 15 credit hours ordinarily would be expected to devote to law school course work 45-50 hours per week. Therefore, upper level students are limited to the 20 hour work policy, except as provided below.

Exceptions from the Policy. With the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Services, a student may request an exception to the 20-hour policy. On a case-by-case basis, the Assistant Dean will ordinarily consider the student’s grade point average, total credit hours being taken in a semester, the content of the hours, the type of work being performed and other variables. However, in no instance will the Assistant Dean approve a student to work more than thirty (30) hours per week while attending school full-time. A student needing to work more than 30 hours can switch to the part-time program, which does not limit hours of outside employment.

Students on Probation. A student who is on academic probation must speak with the Assistant Dean for Student Services prior to making any work commitments. A record of this conversation will be put in the student’s record.

Enforcement. Violations of the work and class hours limits, as set out in the above paragraphs, may result in adverse disciplinary action, reporting to the Character and Fitness Committee of the Board of Bar Examiners, or exclusion from school. All students are required to report their employment to the Student Records Office each semester. Also, if there are any changes to a student’s work scheduling during the semester, the student must report it immediately to the Student Records Office.

Reports showing the quantity and quality of work done during the semester are issued by the University Registrar's Office through ULink at the end of each semester. The unit of credit is the semester hour, which is given for one class hour per week for one semester. The following method of grading will be used for all courses:

Grade Quality Points per Semester Hour
A 4.0
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0
D- 0.7
F 0.0
I 0.0
W 0.0
P/F 0.0
X 0.0
AU 0.0
CR 0.0

The grade point average (GPA) of a student will be calculated by dividing the number of quality points earned by the number of semester hours attempted for all courses in which he/she receives grades of "A", "A-", B+", "B", "B-", "C+", "C", "C-", "D+", "D", "D-", and "F". A student must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in all courses taken to be in good standing.

  1. The law school faculty has adopted a policy whereby certain courses are available on a pass/fail basis only. They include externships, work done for the law journals, Extramural Advocacy Competitions, and other designated courses that do not lend themselves to traditional evaluation.
  2. In addition to the above, upper-level students may elect to take a seminar or independent study on a pass/fail basis with the permission of the instructor and the Assistant Dean for Student Services if there is substantial basis for assessing the student's performance. Students must obtain approval and register for pass/fail grading no later than the last day to add a class. Students may apply no more than two pass/fail seminars or independent studies under this subsection toward graduation.
  3. A grade of "C" (2.0) must be earned in order to receive a pass under either subsection 1 or 2.

All incomplete (I) grades will automatically convert to failing grades (F) unless the work in the course is completed and an actual grade is substituted within one year after the completion of the semester in which the course was taken.

A student receiving a failing grade (F) in a required course must repeat the course. The repetition of the course does not remove the prior grade from the student's academic record. Students who fail a first year course must retake the course at its next offering.

A student who has received a failing grade in a course may not register or be assigned to retake that course with the same professor. A student requesting an exemption from this rule must submit a written request to the Assistant Dean for Student Services showing compelling circumstances.

A student may not retake any course in which the student received a passing grade. Other than required courses, a student may elect to repeat a course in which he or she earned a failing grade (F). The repetition of the course does not remove the prior grade from the student's academic record.

A student who leaves school without officially withdrawing will receive the grade(s) of F in his or her classes. To officially withdraw, the student should meet with the Assistant Dean for Student Services. A student who ceases to attend a class, but who does not officially withdraw from the class, will receive a grade of F.

The academic calendar each semester specifies a last day to withdraw from a class. Requests by upper-level students to withdraw after this date must be accompanied by a timely statement of compelling circumstances to justify why the student should be withdrawn rather than receive a failing grade. The Assistant Dean for Student Services, in consultation with appropriate faculty, shall determine whether to grant the request.

A current Brandeis Law student (or other UofL graduate or professional student) may audit a class under the following conditions:

  1. There is room in the class and no one is on the waiting list;
  2. The instructor agrees to let the student audit the class; and
  3. The total semester credit hours do not exceed 18 for a full-time student or 12 for a part-time student when including the auditing credits.

A part-time student who is eligible to audit will have to pay the per-credit tuition rate for the audited credits up to a total of credit hours of 10. Once he or she has reached 10 credits, the full-time tuition rate is applied, rather than the per-credit tuition rate.

Auditing students are held to the same attendance rules as a graded course. The work and participation required by the auditing student will be determined by the instructor of the course.

Current students may not sit in a class without registering.

Current attorneys may audit a class as a non-degree student under the following conditions:

  1. If there is room in the class after Brandeis Law students register;
  2. The instructor gives specific permission for the outside student to enroll;
  3. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs approves; and
  4. The outside student registers for the class and pays tuition at current rates.

Auditing attorneys are held to the same attendance rules as a graded course. The work and participation required by the auditing student will be determined by the instructor of the course.

Current attorneys may not sit in a class without registering.

Current attorneys should contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs if interested in auditing a course. They will have to make a formal application through the Law Admissions Office.

This procedure is designed to provide fair means for dealing with a student’s complaints regarding a specific action or decision made by the law school administration, the faculty, or a faculty member. Any students who believe they have been treated unfairly, discriminated against, or have had their rights abridged may initiate a grievance. (Redbook, Article 6.8) A grievance filed under this Part is in addition to, and not in lieu of, a complaint involving an ABA standard filed under Part U.

There shall be a School of Law Student Academic Grievance Committee, hereinafter referred to as the Committee, which shall have the power to hear all grievances involving academic matters other than (a) substantive grade appeals and (b) matters falling within the jurisdiction of the Reinstatement and Probation Committee. Academic matters are defined as those concerning instructional activities, research activities, activities closely related to either of these functions, or decisions involving instructions or affecting academic freedom. (Redbook, Article 6.8.3). The Committee may review allegations that a grade has resulted from an unfair procedure, but it shall not render a judgment contrary to that of the faculty member on the substantive merits of the grade. Where the dean agrees with a Committee determination that procedural irregularities have occurred, the dean shall consult with the faculty member involved and the Reinstatement and Probation Committee as to the grade to be recorded in the student’s official transcript.

To assist the student, a Student Grievance Officer shall be provided who is responsible for informing students of their rights and obligations under the grievance procedure and especially the deadlines that have been established. The Student Grievance Officer shall seek to resolve informally as many grievances as possible. (Redbook, Article 6.8.2). Students are encouraged to seek the assistance of the Student Grievance Officer at any stage of the grievance process. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs is the contact person in the law school.

The Committee shall be composed of five (5) members selected as follows: One (1) student selected by the Student Bar Association and four (4) faculty members appointed by the dean. The dean shall select the chair of the Committee. In a situation where the student member is involved in the grievance or removed because of challenge, the Student Bar Association shall appoint an alternate student member for that grievance. When a faculty member of the Committee is involved in the grievance or removed because of challenge, the dean shall appoint an alternate faculty member to serve on the Committee for that grievance.

In pursuing a grievance concerning academic matters within the law school, a student shall follow this procedure:

  1. The student shall first discuss the grievance with the person or persons grieved against (hereinafter referred to as the respondent), and shall attempt to resolve it through informal discussion. This discussion should take place not later than thirty (30) days after the date on which the student first learned, or may reasonably have been expected to have learned, of the cause of the grievance.
  2. If there is no resolution, and if the grievance is not against the law school administration, the student shall discuss the grievance with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, who shall attempt to mediate a resolution.
  3. If the student still has not been able to obtain a resolution, the student may request the Student Grievance Officer to attempt informal mediation of the grievance.
  4. If the grievance has not been satisfactorily resolved through the informal process, the student may submit a written statement of the grievance to the Committee through the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. This statement shall not be submitted later than one year after the date on which the student first learned, or may reasonably have been expected to have learned, of the cause of the grievance. The statement shall contain: (a) a brief narrative of the condition giving rise to the grievance; (b) a designation of the respondent; and (c) a statement of the remedy requested.

Upon receipt of a written statement of a grievance, the chair of the Committee shall:

  1. Consult with the student, the respondent, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and the Student Grievance Officer to obtain assurance that all steps of the informal process were completed and that the issues in the statement were discussed at all levels.
  2. Send a copy of the statement to the respondent and to all Committee members.
  3. Notify the grievant and the respondent of their right to make one (1) peremptory challenge to a Committee member and to challenge Committee members for cause. The Committee’s notice shall include: (a) the names of the Committee members; and (b) a request that any challenges be made promptly to expedite the grievance procedure.
  4. Call a meeting of the Committee to be held within twenty (20) days after receipt of the written statement to review and consider it and to decide whether the grievance states grounds sufficient to warrant a hearing.
  5. Notify the grievant and the respondent of the Committee’s decision and its reasons therefore in writing.
  6. If a hearing is to be held, notify in writing all parties, and any witnesses, of the date, time, and place of the hearing. The notice shall be sent at least ten (10) days prior to the hearing date.
  7. In its notice of hearing, request in writing from the grievant and the respondent any pertinent material that the Committee shall require for its review prior to the hearing. The respondent may submit to the Committee a written statement outlining issues from the respondent’s perspective. The statement and materials either party chooses to submit shall be submitted to the Committee not later than four (4) days prior to the hearing. Committee members shall make every effort to maintain confidentiality throughout the entire grievance process.

All Committee hearings and reports thereon shall be conducted confidentially in the following manner:

  1. The grievant and the respondent must be present during the information-gathering portion of the hearing. Witnesses will be available and called when needed. The Committee may allow the presence of a secretary or technical assistant.
  2. All statements made during the information exchange phase of the hearing shall be tape-recorded (or videotaped). This record shall be preserved in the University Archives for a minimum of five (5) years and shall be confidential.
  3. Any Committee member may question any of the participants at the hearing.
  4. The grievant shall be afforded the opportunity to present statements and to have witnesses testify before the Committee.
  5. The respondent shall have the opportunity to question the grievant and the grievant’s witnesses about their statements.
  6. The respondent shall be afforded the opportunity to present statements and to have witnesses testify before the Committee.
  7. The grievant shall have the opportunity to question the respondent and the respondent’s witnesses about their statements.
  8. After all information is exchanged, all persons, other than Committee members and the recording secretary, shall leave the committee room. The grievant, respondent, and witnesses shall continue to be available to the Committee should further information be needed.
  9. The Committee shall meet in closed session to decide upon its recommendations to the Dean. If the grievance directly involves the Dean, the report and recommendations of the Committee shall be referred for decision to the Provost.
  10. The Committee shall submit its report with recommendations and reasons therefore to the grievant, the respondent, and the Dean (or Provost).
  11. The student’s grievance shall be included in the student’s record.
  12. Until the grievance is resolved, the student may continue the student’s natural academic progression through the academic unit, subject to the requirements of Redbook, Article 6.6 (Academic Review, Advancement, Probation, and Dismissal of Students) and Article 6.7 (Nonacademic Disciplinary Procedures).
  13. The burden of proof shall be on the grievant. The grievant shall establish his right to relief by clear and convincing evidence.

The Dean (or Provost) shall approve or reject the Committee’s recommendations within twenty-eight (28) days after they are received. If the decision of the Dean (or Provost) is in accord with the Committee’s recommendations, the recommendations shall be implemented. If the decision is not in accord with the Committee’s recommendations, the Dean (or Provost) shall state the reasons for that decision, in writing, to all persons directly involved in the grievance and to the Committee. That decision shall be implemented after the time for appeal has elapsed.

Within 21 days after delivery of its report, the grievant or the respondent may petition the Committee to reconsider its report. The petition must be based upon evidence of misrepresentation of material facts or upon newly discovered evidence clearly not available at the original hearing.

Any party to the grievance may appeal to the University Student Grievance Committee within 21 days from the date of the final decision of the Dean (or Provost) if the decision does not accord with the recommendations of the Committee. The appeal shall be in accordance with Articles 6.8.11, 6.8.12, and 6.8.14 of Redbook.

The University of Louisville's Brandeis School of Law is accredited by the American Bar Association's Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar. Law School students who are aware of a problem that directly implicates the Law School’s compliance with the ABA's Standards for Approval of Law Schools should direct their communication to the Dean of the Law School. All such communications must be in writing and must state with specificity both the ABA accreditation standard or standards at issue and the factual circumstances that suggest noncompliance.

At his or her discretion, the Dean may refer the matter to other personnel within the Law School or at the University of Louisville. Within 30 days of receiving a written communication identifying a problem that directly implicates the Law School’s program of legal education and its compliance with the ABA's Standards for Approval of Law Schools, the Dean shall respond in writing to the student(s) who submitted the communication. That response may take the form of a request for further information enabling the Dean to address the Law School's compliance with the ABA standards at issue. In all events, the Dean's determination shall be final.

The Law School shall maintain a record of all communications received under this policy, including the resolution adopted by the Law School in response to those communications. This record shall be maintained throughout each period of accreditation by the American Bar Association.

Students may, with the advanced approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Services, earn a limited number of hours at another ABA accredited law school. This may be done by visiting another school for one or two semester(s) or a summer term, or by participating in an approved international program. Credit will be given only in courses approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Services and in which the student earns a grade of C or higher. Grades in these courses will not be counted in the student’s Brandeis grade point average or impact graduation honors. Special ABA restrictions apply to online courses. For details, consult the Assistant Dean for Student Services. Neither the course name nor the grade will be posted on the student’s official transcript. Note that transfer students must complete at least 30 of their last 36 credit hours at the University of Louisville. See Chapter 2, Part A of this Handbook.

  1. Students having a 2.0 or better average and having completed at least 19 hours may register for seminars.
  2. No more than two seminars may be taken in any semester.
  3. All seminars have limited enrollment.
  4. Both part-time and full-time students are eligible to take seminars, subject to the above rules.
  1. An Independent Study may be for one (1) or two (2) credit hours.
  2. With the permission of the Assistant Dean for Student Services and the supervising faculty member, a student may take an independent study on a pass/fail basis. Students may apply no more than two pass/fail independent studies or seminars toward graduation.
  3. A “credit hour” is based on 50 minutes of in-class instruction and two hours of out-of-class work (See Chapter 2, Part A). This would require 42.5 hours of work over a fifteen week semester for a one credit hour independent study.
  4. Only students having a 2.0 or better average and at least 19 hours may register for an independent study.
  5. Students may apply no more than four (4) credit hours of independent studies toward graduation, unless the Assistant Dean grants a hardship exception.
  6. An independent study paper does not satisfy any graduation requirement, e.g., the writing requirement or the skills requirement, other than counting toward the total credits required for graduation from the School of Law.
  7. All independent studies must be supervised by a full-time School of Law faculty. However, the faculty member does not have to be the sole supervisor.
  8. To enroll in an independent study, the student must submit to Student Records a completed Independent Study Form, which requires the supervising faculty member’s signature. This completed form must be submitted prior to the last day to add a class, so that the Assistant Dean may approve the Independent Study in time for the student to register.
  9. Students enrolled in an independent study will be required to keep track of time spent working on the assignment.
  1. Students may also earn credit for work in connection with one of the journals sponsored by the Law School. To be awarded academic credit, the student’s work must be of sufficient quality to merit a grade of “C” or better, as certified by the student’s faculty advisor for the course. The amount of credit for various activities and for publication is indicated on the course schedule.
  2. A student may not apply toward the JD degree more than 7 total hours of credit for journal activity.
  3. Students enrolled in a journal will be required to keep track of time spent working on the assignment.
  1. Students may take one externship per semester. A student may register for a second externship in the same semester if:
    1. the field placement supervisors confirm that concurrent enrollment will not create conflicts;
    2. the faculty supervisors and Assistant Dean for Student Services approve;
    3. seats are available after the close of registration; and
    4. the student’s Supreme Court Student Practice Certification can be completed in a timely manner.
  2. Students may not apply more than 12 hours of externship and Extramural Advocacy Competition (934) credit toward the 90 hours necessary for graduation. (See Extramural Advocacy Rules below).
  3. All participants in the Law Clinic, the Entrepreneurship Clinic, and the Criminal Justice, Legal Aid, and Immigration Externships must be certified under the Kentucky Student Practice Rule and must have completed 60 hours. Applications for certification must be submitted by the deadline established by the Student Records Office. The instructor may refuse applications submitted after the deadline. All externships are pass/fail.
  4. Refer to the Law School’s course catalog for externship and clinic prerequisites.
  5. Students earning credit through a judicial externship may not earn credit for a second semester judicial externship experience. Students earning credit through an externship other than a judicial externship may enroll in only one additional semester of externship work at the same placement site. Whenever a student enrolls for a second semester experience at the same placement site, the student, faculty, and field supervisor should consult about expectations to foster a meaningful learning experience.
  6. Students enrolled in an externship or clinic will be required to keep track of time spent working on the externship or in the clinic.

Students may earn academic credit for participation in extramural advocacy competitions. Each competition must consist of a rigorous educational experience under the guidance and support of a qualified coach and/or faculty advisor which places emphasis on the development of professional legal skills. In order to receive academic credit for extramural advocacy competitions, a student must participate in an adequate number of meetings and preparation sessions, and communicate regularly with the team coach and/or faculty advisor.

The coach and/or faculty advisor must provide the competitors with training in the skills that are the subject of the competition, multiple opportunities to practice those skills, and detailed, in-depth feedback. Such competitions must require that competitors apply and demonstrate specific professional legal skills, such as written and oral advocacy at appellate or trial levels, arbitration, negotiations, or client interviewing and counseling. So much as competition rules permit, students must perform under substantial, continuous supervision and instruction by (1) a full time School of Law faculty member or (2) an adjunct or other individual, appointed by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, working with a full-time School of Law faculty member.

The faculty members and other instructors shall evaluate the students’ written and oral performances and determine the number of credits each student has earned. Students may earn no more than two (2) hours credit for participation in a single competition and may apply no more than six (6) hours of Extramural Advocacy Competition (934) credit toward the ninety (90) hours necessary for graduation.

Students may receive credit for no more than one extramural advocacy per semester and ordinarily may participate in no more than one per semester. For a student to participate in more than one in the same semester, the Assistant Dean for Student Services, faculty members, and other instructors must first approve. First-year students are ineligible to participate, except to the extent of trying out for a team if the competition will take place during their second year. (See Externship Rules above for other limitations on credit).

Students enrolled in an extramural advocacy competition will be required to keep track of time spent working on the competition.

All students who wish to apply hours earned abroad to their Law School degree must satisfy all the requirements set forth in Section 2 or 3 below. In addition, they must contact the University of Louisville International Center, and complete all paperwork and other requirements established by the International Center.

Grades earned in Study Abroad courses will not count toward the student’s Brandeis grade point average or graduation honors.

Students may take up to thirty (30) hours at an ABA-approved program of foreign law study. Students may enroll for one or two semesters. Students must obtain permission from the foreign host school; a faculty contact at the host school must be provided; and the curriculum and proposed course of study must be approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Services. While international course work is generally elective in nature, the perspective requirement may be met through international course work.

Those courses in which a student receives a C or above will be counted as Pass, and those courses in which a student receives a C- or below will not be awarded credit.

Brandeis School of Law has specially arranged programs with several universities abroad. Students may earn no more than 30 credit hours towards the JD degree outside the Law School. This includes credit hours from foreign institutions, other ABA-approved law schools as a visiting student, and graduate-level courses taken outside the Law School.

  1. Montpellier Law School Exchange—Students’ home institution pays a special host fee of $3,500. Opportunity to obtain European masters in one year.
  2. University of Leeds—Student pays tuition to their home university, but is responsible for ancillary costs or fees from the University of Louisville at the same level they would be at the University of Leeds. Students may visit for one or two semesters, but at any one time, there may be no more than two students visiting each campus.
  3. University of Luxembourg—Students may visit for one semester, but there be no more than two students visiting each campus each semester. Exchange students will pay tuition fees and other related fees to their home institution and will be exempt from paying such fees to the host institution. Opportunity to obtain European masters in one year.
  4. Queen’s University Belfast—Students may visit for one or two semesters, but at any one time, there may be no more than two students visiting each campus. Students will pay tuition fee and ancillary fees to the home university. Visiting students will not be charged tuition fees by the host institution but may be required to (or may elect to) pay ancillary fees at the same level of the host’s own students.

The faculty of the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law (the Law School) reaffirms that study of the legal systems and cultures of other countries enhances students’ legal education. The Law School has developed relationships with certain foreign law schools. Students who study abroad at these partner schools may qualify for a tuition or other advantage. However, students are also free to arrange for study at non-partner institutions. The Law School intends to allow its students to participate in available educational opportunities at foreign institutions that will enhance the students’ legal educations, subject to the following criteria:

  1. Students in good standing at the Law School may spend no more than two semesters of study at any foreign institution after successful completion of 19 hours in the Law School;
  2. A proposed course of foreign study must be approved in advance by the Assistant Dean for Student Services, and must comply with the ABA Criteria for Accepting Credit for Student Study at a Foreign Institution (the ABA Criteria);
  3. Students may earn no more than 30 credit hours towards the JD degree outside the Law School. This includes credit hours from foreign institutions, other ABA-approved law schools as a visiting student, and graduate-level courses taken outside the Law School;
  4. In order to count credit hours earned under this rule toward the JD degree, students must earn grades of the equivalent of C or higher. Credit hours will be applied towards the JD degree on a pass-fail basis, and grades earned will not be reflected in a student’s GPA or class rank.
  5. A full-time faculty member at the Law School familiar with the course of study at the foreign institution must act as sponsor of the student’s foreign study;
  6. Courses taken at a foreign institution may, in appropriate circumstances and with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Services, satisfy the Perspective Course requirement. They may not satisfy the student’s Upper Division Writing Requirement or other specific graduation requirements of the School of Law;
  7. Credit will be given only for approved academic coursework at foreign institutions, and not for foreign externships;
  8. Ordinarily, foreign courses of study will only be approved at institutions with which the Law School has an existing working relationship;
  9. Student study at foreign institutions must comply with all other rules promulgated from time to time by the Law School administration for purposes of compliance with the ABA Criteria.

Brandeis School of Law maintains two computer labs for the exclusive use of its students, faculty and staff. The labs are located on the first floor and in the basement of the Law Library. Each lab features 11 computer workstations, one LexisNexis printer and one network printer. Two additional printers are also located outside the first floor lab and in the classroom wing outside room 175 for wireless printing from students’ laptop computers.

The Brandeis School of Law IT Department maintains lab computers and printers. Computer lab users may not modify, or attempt to modify, any hardware or software, including installing applications. Computer lab users should not themselves attempt to remedy or repair computer problems, clear printer jams, etc. Instead, report problems as soon as possible to the IT Help Desk:

Computer lab users should be considerate of other lab users by keeping conversation and noise to a minimum and not viewing web or multimedia content that may be offensive to others.

Violation of this policy by students may result in loss of the use of law school technology resources, including printing. Violation of this policy or University acceptable use policies may also result in additional sanctions.

The Brandeis School of Law IT Department maintains classroom computers and presentation technologies for use by law school faculty, staff and students, University of Louisville users and guest speakers and lecturers, to enhance the school’s teaching mission and activities. Classroom technology users may not modify, or attempt to modify, any hardware, software or other technologies. Nor should classroom users attempt to remedy or repair problems with those technologies. Instead, report problems as soon as possible to the IT Help Desk:

Violation of this policy by students may result in loss of the use of law school technology resources, including printing. Violation of this policy or University acceptable use policies may also result in additional sanctions.

The Brandeis School of Law IT department maintains desktop computers and printers in certain student organization offices for the exclusive use of those organizations’ officers or editors and members. Student organization users may not modify, or attempt to modify, any hardware or software, including installing applications. Student organization users should not themselves attempt to remedy or repair computer problems, clear printer jams, etc. Instead, report problems as soon as possible to the IT Help Desk:

Student organizations are allocated and encouraged to use space on the law school’s file server for storage of organization documents, spreadsheets, etc. Each organization’s leadership is responsible for notifying the IT Department of the personal names and ULink user names of all officers or editors and members to whom access to the organization’s electronic files should be given.

Violation of this policy by students may result in loss of the use of law school technology resources, including printing. Violation of this policy or University acceptable use policies may also result in additional sanctions.

All students’ computer accounts, including, but not limited to ULink, CardMail, Active Directory and ulsecure, are created, maintained and, if appropriate, deleted, by the University of Louisville’s Information Technology Security and Account Management unit. Students are hereby given notice that use of their computer accounts is governed by the University of Louisville Information Security Office’s policies respecting User Accounts and Acceptable Use and Passwords.

Violation of any of the following rules may result in loss of the use of law school technology resources, including printing.

  1. Each enrolled law student is allocated five hundred (500) pages of printing credit during fall and spring semesters and one hundred (100) pages during summer semesters.
  2. As print jobs sent to LexisNexis printers do not affect printing allocations, students are advised to print LexisNexis research to its printers. One LexisNexis printer is located in each computer lab.
  3. At any time, students may purchase additional printing credit at the Law Resource Center in room 272 during normal business hours.
  4. Additional printing credit purchased at the Law Resource Center may not be credited to the student’s printing account until the next business day. Therefore, it is incumbent upon each student to monitor his or her printing balance and plan accordingly.
  5. Additional printing credit is sold in three-dollar ($3.00) increments of one hundred (100) pages ($.03 per page).

Refunds of printing credit will only be granted if a student is charged for print jobs that do not print, or his/her prints are sufficiently flawed as to make them objectively unusable. A member of the Brandeis School of Law IT staff shall make those determinations. Refunds will be granted only for the number of flawed pages, and not necessarily for the entire print job. To receive a refund for an aborted or flawed print job, the student must report the problem immediately to the IT Help Desk:

Exceptions to general printing limits will be granted to the following students in the following manners:

Student Organization Officers, Editors and Members
Editors, officers and members of student organizations, including the University of Louisville Law Review, Journal of Law & Education, Journal of Animal & Environmental Law, Student Bar Association and Moot Court Board, may and must use the organization's office printer(s) for organization-related work.

Research Assistants
Faculty research assistants will be granted access to a network printer in the Law Resource Center in Room 272. This printer should only be used for work related to one's assignments as a research assistant.

The Brandeis School of Law IT Department can only provide limited support for law students’ computing devices, including laptop computers, tablets, smartphones or other mobile devices. Support is limited to:

  • Installation, configuration and troubleshooting of applications specifically required or distributed free of charge by the law school, such as Exam4.
  • Connecting to the University of Louisville’s secure wireless network, ulsecure. Any student wishing to connect his/her computer or other Wi-Fi-capable device to the university’s wireless network is responsible for complying with applicable network standards promulgated by the University of Louisville Information Security Office governing Network Service and Workstation and Computing Devices.
  • Connecting to and using the law school’s wireless laptop printers.

The law school IT Department does not support, repair or diagnose any student-owned hardware or operating system problems; and only provides the application and operating system support described above. Students must obtain such support from their computer’s manufacturer, software vendors or private computer repair services.

The law school permits students to take examinations on computer or by handwriting in exam bluebooks. Typewritten exams are no longer permitted. Taking any examination on computer is not a right but a privilege, subject to individual faculty approval and conditioned on each student's compliance with all of the requirements and expectations set forth in this policy.

The law school licenses and supports Extegrity's Exam4 software for use by every student on in-class, essay exams, but cannot and does not guarantee compatibility between Exam4 and any particular student's computer. Each student must provide:

  1. His or her own computer. The computer must meet or exceed Exam4's hardware and software requirements, which are updated regularly and posted at Exams on Computer on the Brandeis Law Intranet.
  2. A portable storage device, such as a USB flash drive, for storage and submission of completed exams.

Students must also successfully complete a practice exam using the Exam4 application, under rules established by the Assistant Dean for Information Technology. Students taking exams on computer acknowledge and accept that they may be required to take or complete an exam by hand in approved bluebooks if they do not complete the practice exam in strict compliance with the rules or in cases of pertinent software or hardware problems.

A new version of Exam4, for both Mac and PC, will be provided at least once each semester, and each student is responsible for obtaining, installing and testing the most recent version available for his or her exams by applicable deadlines, which are published on the Brandeis Law Intranet and in The Daily Docket e-mail newsletter.

Each semester in advance of exams, the Brandeis School of Law IT Department will make Exam4 available to students and publish instructions for obtaining, downloading, installing and testing Exam4. Each student who wishes to use his or her computer to take any exam that semester must successfully:

  1. Download the applicable version of Exam4;
  2. Install the applicable version of Exam4;
  3. Properly complete a practice test using the applicable version of Exam4; and
  4. Submit the practice test by the applicable deadline for doing so. Practice test deadlines each semester will be posted on the Brandeis Law Intranet and in The Daily Docket e-mail newsletter, and each student is presumed to have notice of such deadlines.

A properly completed practice test is one on which the student has identified himself or herself using his or her ULink user name (e.g., ldbran01). A practice test on which the student has identified himself or herself by his or her personal name, or a portion thereof, student ID number, a string of sequential or random numbers, etc. is not properly completed. No student will have satisfied the practice test requirement whose practice test was not successfully submitted electronically using Exam4 by the applicable deadline.

Any student who experiences difficulty downloading, installing or running Exam4, submitting a practice test or otherwise complying with these requirements by any published practice test deadline must notify the Assistant Dean for Information Technology on or before the date by which any practice test must be submitted. The Assistant Dean for IT or another member of the IT Department shall make reasonable efforts and/or recommendations to assist the student in complying with the practice test requirement and deadline.

Exemptions, Extensions and Modifications

Exemptions from, or extensions or other modifications to the practice test requirement may only be made for cause by the Assistant Dean for Information Technology upon petition from the student seeking such exemption, extension or modification. The Assistant Dean for Information Technology shall not grant any exemption from or extension or modification to any practice test requirement unless the student requesting such exemption, extension or modification has met each of the following conditions:

  1. The student has submitted his or her petition for an exemption, extension or modification to the Assistant Dean for Information Technology on or before the applicable practice test deadline;
  2. The student has made good faith efforts to comply with applicable practice test requirements; and
  3. Reasonably unforeseeable circumstances prevented the student from complying with the applicable practice test requirements.
Penalties

Any student who does not comply with the practice test requirements, as detailed above, is not permitted to use Exam4 for any exam for which the applicable practice test was required. By taking any exam using Exam4, a student certifies that he/she has complied with applicable practice test requirements and has received notice from the Brandeis School of Law IT Department that he or she has complied with applicable practice test requirements.

Brandeis School of Law IT staff shall refuse to provide technical assistance or support to any student who has not complied with applicable practice test requirements and who attempts to circumvent those requirements by taking any exam using Exam4.

Additionally, Brandeis School of Law IT staff shall refuse to provide technical assistance or support, including use of any external storage media, to any student who cannot successfully submit his or her exam electronically and who has failed to supply his or her own USB flash drive on which to save and submit an Exam4 file.

If the identity of any student who has not complied with applicable practice test requirements, as detailed above, and who takes or attempts to take any exam using Exam4 becomes known to a member of the IT staff, the Assistant Dean for Information Technology shall notify the Assistant Dean for Student Services who will note the occurrence in the student's file.

Before Exams

Brandeis School of Law IT staff will be available to provide technical support for at least one (1) hour before any exam on which students are permitted to take the exam using Exam4, during all such exams and for a reasonable time after any such exam has ended. Each student planning to take an exam using Exam4 must bring:

  1. The computer on which he or she has successfully installed and tested Exam4, along with the computer's AC adapter/power supply and fully charged battery or batteries;
  2. A functioning USB flash drive;
  3. Approved bluebooks, which are available for sale in the Law Resource Center in Room 272; and
  4. Ink pens or other writing instruments.

Each student planning to take an exam using Exam4 must:

  1. Report to the assigned exam room;
  2. Set up and boot up his or her computer and log on to the university's secure wireless network (ulsecure);
  3. Open Exam4, provide one's assigned exam number and other information at the appropriate prompts, stop at the screen that says “Wait!” in large red letters; and
  4. Click Begin Exam only when instructed by the professor that he or she may begin the exam.

An Exam4 file is not like a conventional word processing document. It is encrypted and cannot be modified once the student has ended an Exam4 session. Therefore, it is extremely important that each student:

  1. Correctly identify him or herself using his or her assigned exam number;
  2. Correctly provide any other information, such as a pledge, as instructed by the professor; and
  3. Do nothing that will disclose the student's identity to the professor or otherwise compromise his or her anonymity.

No member of the law school IT Department may correct students' mistakes or make other modifications to any Exam4 exam.

Troubleshooting Procedure
  1. Any student whose computer exhibits a problem or irregularity in anticipation of taking, while taking or having immediately taken an exam using Exam4 in compliance with the practice test and other requirements must bring his or her computer and AC adapter/power supply immediately and directly to an on-duty member of the Brandeis School of Law IT Department and describe the problem(s) in as much detail as possible.
  2. The IT staff member on duty will complete an Exam4 Incident Report, noting:
    • The time the student arrived;
    • The student's name and exam number;
    • The nature of the problem;
    • Steps taken to resolve the problem and whether the problem was resolved; and
    • The time the student leaves.
  3. The IT staff member will transmit the Exam4 Incident Report to the Dean on Duty.
  4. The student must next visit the Dean on Duty, who will determine whether to allow the student additional time and, if so, how much.
  5. The Dean on Duty will discharge the student to resume the exam, or with other instructions, giving the student a signed note indicating additional time or other consideration the student shall be afforded to complete the exam.
Following Exams

Upon the student completing and electronically submitting an exam, Exam4 will confirm that the exam was successfully submitted. However, students may further confirm their exam submission on the monitor in the IT Department hallway.

Any student who cannot successfully submit his or her exam electronically must save the exam to a USB flash drive and immediately bring the flash drive to an on-duty member of the IT Department, who will copy the encrypted exam file and return the flash drive to the student.

Any student who cannot successfully submit his or her exam electronically and who has failed to bring a USB flash drive on which to copy the exam file will be refused technical assistance or support (see Penalties, above).

The determination whether to close or delay classes is made by the University of Louisville; the Brandeis School of Law follows those determinations. The School of Law follows the University’s lead in all weather-related cancellations and delays.

Please note that the University will provide official school closing information in the following ways:

  • A notice at the top of the University home page;
  • Rave Alert messages to all students and employees at their official university e-mail addresses;
  • Rave Alert text messages sent to all students and employees registered to receive them; and
  • Recorded message at 852-5555.

The specific School of Law policies state:

  1. If the University cancels classes for the entire day, all School of Law classes are canceled.
  2. If the University delays the start of classes, the following rules apply:
    1. All classes scheduled to end at or before 10:15 a.m. are canceled,
    2. All classes scheduled to begin at 10:25 a.m. will meet at their normal time, and
  3. If the university cancels evening classes, all School of Law classes beginning at or after 4:15 p.m. are canceled.
  4. Notwithstanding the prior rules, if any delay or cancellation affects only the Belknap campus, Law Clinic and Law Clinic II will meet as scheduled, unless the Clinic Director indicates otherwise.

Check the University of Louisville's home page for the latest information about closings, cancellations or delays.

Students of the School of Law are subject to all University regulations, including those relating to student rights, responsibilities and disciplinary matters. In addition, students are subject to the special regulations of the faculty of the School of Law. The faculty reserves the privilege of amending or changing its regulations at any time, and of making such changes applicable to students previously registered in the School of Law.

Violations of the Honor Code, Code of Student Conduct or other applicable standards of student conduct will be reported to bar admission authorities as part of their character and fitness inquiry procedures.

If a student knowingly makes a false statement or conceals material information on an application for admission, registration forms or any other University document, or is otherwise guilty of dishonest conduct, the student's registration may be canceled and he or she will be ineligible (except by special action of the faculty) for subsequent registration.

The School of Law reserves the right to terminate the attendance, or to strike from the list of candidates for the JD degree, any student whom it deems unworthy because of neglect of study, incapacity for the law, or defect in conduct or character not in keeping with the standards of the School of Law and of the legal profession.

The Law School recognizes that participation in cyber communities can be used in positive ways to build community on and off campus. However, these outlets may also be used in inappropriate and harmful ways. As future members of the legal profession, law students should conduct themselves in all matters with courtesy, civility and professionalism. Students should be aware that some online activities may give rise to a complaint under the Student Code of Conduct or the School of Law Honor Code, or might be reported by third parties to relevant bar character and fitness authorities.

The most up-to-date version of the Sexual Harassment Policy is available on the University’s website.

The most up-to-date version of the Student Sexual Misconduct Policy is available on the University’s website.

Directory Information

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and the UofL Student Records Policy, the University of Louisville may release certain categories of "directory information" about you, such as your name, address, e-mail address and telephone number without first obtaining your permission. The telephone directory, for example, uses this information. You may instruct the University to withhold your directory information. If you wish to do so, you must obtain the required form from the University Archives and Records Center, Ekstrom Library. A new form for non-disclosure must be completed each year.

ADA Policy Statement University of Louisville

The University of Louisville is committed to providing equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (504). The University's 504/ADA Coordinator is responsible for all campus activities relevant to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. The University Affirmative Action Officer will monitor compliance and assist all unit heads in meeting their equal opportunity obligations. The University Disability Resource Center staff will assist the university community in fulfilling its responsibility by serving as an information resource center and coordinating support services for students with disabilities.

ADA and 504 Grievance Procedures University of Louisville

The following grievance procedure is being recommended to provide prompt and equitable resolution of complaints concerning ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

The University of Louisville ADA Grievance Procedure is an internal grievance procedure providing for prompt and equitable resolution of complaints alleging any action prohibited by the U.S. Department of Justice regulations implementing Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Title II states, in part, that "no otherwise qualified individual with a disability shall, solely by reason of such disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination" in programs or activities sponsored by an agency.

General information regarding ADA or 504 can be addressed to:

Director
Disability Resource Center
119 Stevenson Hall
Phone: 502-852-6938

Complaints should be addressed to the person who has been designated to coordinate ADA compliance efforts:

ADA Coordinator
SAC, Suite W301
Phone: 502-852-1198

  1. A complaint should be filed in writing, contain the name and address of the person filing it, and briefly describe the alleged violation. Upon receipt of the written notice of complaint, the Director of Affirmative Action/Employee Relations or his/her designee shall acknowledge receipt within five workdays.
  2. A complaint should be filed within 180 days after the complainant becomes aware of the alleged violation.
  3. An investigation, as may be appropriate, shall follow a filing of complaint. The investigation shall be conducted by the Affirmative Action Office. This internal Complaint procedure contemplates an informal but thorough investigation, affording all interested persons and their representatives, if any, an opportunity to submit evidence relevant to a complaint.
  4. A written determination regarding the investigation of the complaint and a description of the resolution, if any, shall be issued by the Affirmative Action Office.
  5. Affirmative Action Office and a copy forwarded to the complainant no later than 60 days after its filing.
  6. The Affirmative Action Office shall maintain the files and records relating to the complaints filed.
  7. The complainants may request a reconsideration of the case in instances where he or she is dissatisfied with the resolution. The request for reconsideration should be made within 15 work days after receipt of the determination to the Affirmative Action Office.
  8. The right of a person to a prompt and equitable resolution of the complaint filed hereunder shall not be impaired by the person's pursuit of other remedies such as the filing of an ADA complaint with the responsible federal department or agency. Use of this grievance procedure is not a prerequisite to the pursuit of other remedies.
  9. These rules shall be construed to protect the substantive rights of interested persons, to meet appropriate due process standards, and to assure that the University complies with the ADA and implementing regulations.