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Graduate Programs and Professional Study

The Graduate School

The Graduate School administers graduate degree programs in over 60 academic fields, including programs in education, basic medical sciences, nursing, public health, engineering, business and arts & sciences. There are over 60 master's level programs and 30 doctoral level programs available. For more information on the Graduate School, please call the Office of Research and Graduate Programs, 852-6495.

 

Professional Schools

For information on preprofessional curriculum and admissions requirements of the professional schools, students should contact the Arts and Sciences Advising Center.

The University includes four professional schools: the School of Dentistry, the Brandeis School of Law, the School of Medicine and the Kent School of Social Work. Entrance requirements for the professional schools are as follows: 

The School of Dentistry

The School of Dentistry offers three degree programs. They are the Doctoral of Dental Medicine, Masters of Science in Oral Biology and a Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene. For the Doctoral degree, most applicants have earned a BA or B.S. degree prior to enrollment.  Applicants must have a minimum of 90 college credit hours to apply to the DMD program. It is recommended that applicants complete a minimum of 32 hours of science course work, including courses in biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry and physics.

The Master's degree program in Oral Biology contains graduate level courses provided by departments within the School of Dentistry.  This program is directed toward a general understanding of the biology of dental science.  Students obtain detailed knowledge and necessary skills required to perform biologic research.  For more information, see the U of L Graduate catalog.

The Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene program is a four year program with a Lower and Upper Division.  Students complete the lower division requirements on the Belknap campus and then apply for admission to the Upper Division in the Dental School on the Health Sciences Center Campus.

More detailed information about admission requirements and application procedures may be obtained at the School of Dentistry website: www.dental.louisville.edu or by contacting the Office of Student Affairs, School of Dentistry, (502) 852-5081.

 

The Louis D. Brandeis School of Law

The Brandeis School of Law offers a degree program leading to the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree. 

The program accommodates both full-time and part-time study.  Full-time students complete the JD program in three years; part-time study can be completed in four years.  

The School of Law also offers six double competence programs.  The joint MBA/JD degree is offered in conjunction with the University's College of Business; the MSSW/JD is offered in cooperation with the Kent School of Social Work.  The joint JD/MA in Humanities is offered in conjunction with the Division of Humanities of the Graduate School.  The joint JD/Master of Divinity is offered in collaboration with the Louisville Presbyterian Thelogical Seminary.  The joint JD/MA in Political Science is offered in conjunction with the Department of Political Science.  The joint MUP/JD degree in Urban Planning and Law is offered in conjunction with the University's Department of Urban and Public Affairs.

Successful candidates for admission must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution prior to enrollment. Candidates must also take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) prior to admission. More detailed information about admission requirements and application procedures can be obtained at http://louisville.edu/brandeislaw or by calling the Office of Admissions, Brandeis School of Law, 852–6364.

The law touches many phases of life and no uniform pre-law curriculum or major is prescribed for undergraduates. A liberal arts education is emphasized as far more important than an education directed toward later professional training.

Academic preparation should include courses that emphasize critical thinking, analysis, writing, and communication skills. These skills are necessary for the study of law.  Generally, students interested in pursuing a legal career may follow the major of their choice. Those most commonly chosen are Political Science, Business, English, History, and Philosophy.

Jasmine Farrier, Department of Political Science, Terry Edwards, Justice Administration,Tom Mackey, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences, and Sherri Wallace, Advisor to the Thurgood Marshall Pre-Law Society, serve as Prelaw Advisors, assisting students in developing an integrated program of undergraduate studies tailored to their particular needs and interests, preparing for the Law School Admission Test, and choosing a law school suited to individual career objectives. The LSAT is normally taken in June following the Junior year or in the fall of the Senior year. Application packets are available from the Admission Office at the Brandeis School of Law and the Political Science Department. In the course of fulfilling requirements in their major fields, pre-law students are urged to include as many of the following as possible:

• Division of Humanities, Arts and Sciences

—English 309, Advanced Writing*

—Philosophy 211, Critical Thinking

—Philosophy 311, Introduction to Logic*

—Philosophy 322, Contemporary Ethical Problems

—Philosophy 323, Medical Ethics

—Philosophy 350, Philosophy of Law

• Division of Natural Sciences, Arts and Sciences

—Biology 263, Environmental Biology

—Biology 364, Genetics and Man

-—Mathematics 109, Elementary Statistics

• Division of Social Sciences, Arts and Sciences

—Communication 111, Speech Communication

—Political Science 201, Fundamentals of American Government

—Political Science 202, Comparative Political Systems

—Any two of these:

• Political Science 312, Constitutional Law*

• Political Science 313, Civil Liberties*

• Political Science 314, Judicial Process*

• Political Science 513 Politics of Law

—Psychology 383, Forensic Psychology

—History 315-316, American Constitutional History

• School of Business

—Accounting 201-202, Fundamentals of Accounting*

—Economics 201-202, Principles of Economics*

  • NOTE: Most highly recommended.

 

The School of Medicine

Applicants to the first-year class of the University of Louisville School of Medicine are considered individually and are selected based on merit without consideration of race, religion, sex, age, or national origin. The Admissions Committee evaluates an applicant‘s acceptability based on the premedical record, scores on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), commendations from Premedical Advisory Committees, established technical standards for admissions and the applicant’s personality and motivation as evaluated by interviews with members of the Committee. Complete four-year college preparation is encouraged.  Early decision program is encouraged for stellar applicants. Inquiries concerning admission should be addressed to:

Office of Admissions

Abell Administration Ctr., Rm. 413

323 East Chestnut St.

Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (502) 852-5193 or

medadm@louisville.edu

Programs of medical education that award the degree of doctor of medicine in the United States and Canada are accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME). This agency is sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association. The University of Louisville School of Medicine is a member of the Association of American Medical Colleges and is accredited by LCME.

Application Process: The University of Louisville School of Medicine participates in the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS).  Application materials are available by May at the AMCAS website:

www.aamc.org

Upon receipt of the application from AMCAS the University of Louisville Medical School Office of Admissions will email additional application materials to qualified applicants.  Completed secondary applications are due in the Office of Admissions by December 31. A processing fee of $75.00 is charged and is not refundable, nor can it be credited toward tuition if the applicant is accepted. The fee may be waived, however, if the applicant has received a fee waiver from AMCS. More information about the application process can be obtained at http://louisville.edu/medschool/admissions.

 

Residence Status: Although applications from nonresidents are accepted, residents of Kentucky are given preference for admission. This policy is consistent with the mission of the University of Louisville as a state university. Residency must be established prior to making application. Absent special circumstances, an applicant must be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States to be considered for admission to the School of Medicine. Special circumstances may be considered where the applicant has a pending application for permanent residency status in the United States and A) is married to a U.S. citizen who has an established residence in Kentucky and intends to remain in Kentucky, or B) has numerous members of his or her immediate family who have established residence in Kentucky and expect to remain in Kentucky indefinitely. All decisions as to whether special circumstances exist in a particular application for admission shall be made by the Dean or his designee.” The process of selecting medical school applicants involves a variety of considerations including academic, non academic, and personal characteristics. Admission to medical school requires a strong foundation in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics), highly developed communication skills, and a solid background in the social sciences and humanities. Specific majors are not recommended, but the undergraduate major area of study should be a careful and considered decision. All applicants to medical school must take the Medical College Admission Test. MCAT applications are available via the AMCAS web site at www.aamc.org. Students considering making application to medical school should contact the College of Arts & Sciences Pre-Health Professional Advising Committee for more information. Faculty members from different disciplines of the University are involved in this group.  Open advising sessions are scheduled during the academic year. Students are provided information about the sequencing of required and recommended courses, the admissions test and the application process and, at the time of application to medical school, may use services provided by the Advising Center in putting together their Premedical Recommendation Report. 

PreOptometry There are no schools of optometry in Kentucky. However, Kentucky does have contracts with the following schools to reserve spaces (a total of 14) for students who are legal residents of Kentucky: the School of Optometry at Indiana University in Bloomington (www.opt.indiana.edu); the School of Optometry at the University of Alabama in Birmingham (www.uab.edu/optometry) and Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, TN (www.sco.edu). Admission is competitive and each school of optometry awards its contract positions to students who apply and are accepted into its program. Students admitted under the contract program will be charged reduced tuition with Kentucky paying the difference to the college for a maximum of four years. Students who are planning to apply to schools of optometry can fulfill the preoptometry course requirements at the University of Louisville. Since schools of optometry vary somewhat in their course requirements for admission, students interested in making application should select schools to which they have an interest in applying so that they can schedule courses to meet requirements for those schools.  In general, students planning to make application to schools of optometry will need a minimum of three years of college coursework including a heavy concentration in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics) as well as courses in social sciences and humanities. Many schools of optometry give preference to students who have completed a bachelor’s degree; all schools require applicants to take the Optometry Admission Test. Students considering making application to optometry school should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Pre-Health Professions Advising Committee (http://louisville.edu/a-s/advising) for more information. Open advising sessions are scheduled during the academic year.

PrePharmacy Students who are interested in making application to a school of pharmacy can complete prerequisite course requirements at the University of Louisville. Although requirements for admission to pharmacy schools are similar, they do vary. Students should select schools to which they are interested in applying and schedule courses to meet those requirements. The University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy (www.mc.uky.edu/Pharmacy) is the only school in Kentucky to offer a pharmacy degree. The degree program involves a four year professional curriculum leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Pre-Pharmacy students at the University of Louisville should consult the UK College of Pharmacy website for the undergraduate courses required for admission to this program. Admission to pharmacy schools is competitive.

Students will need two to three years of college coursework with a heavy concentration in the natural sciences in order to meet minimum prerequisites.

Those holding bachelor’s degrees or completing bachelor’s degrees in biology and chemistry are particularly encouraged to apply. All applicants must take the Pharmacy College Admission Test. Students considering making application to pharmacy school should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Pre-Health Professions Advising Committee (http://louisville.edu/a-s/advising) for more information. Faculty members from different disciplines of the university are involved in this group. Open advising sessions are scheduled during the academic year.

 

PreVeterinary Medicine There is not a school of veterinary medicine in Kentucky. However, Kentucky does have contracts with the following schools in Alabama to reserve spaces for students who are legal residents of Kentucky: Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine (34 spaces; www.vetmed.auburn.edu) and Tuskegee University School of Veterinary Medicine (2 spaces; www.tuskegee.edu/Global/category.as p?C=41703). Admission is competitive with selection made by the respective schools. Students admitted to either the Auburn or Tuskegee program will be charged instate tuition, with Kentucky making a payment for each enrolling student for up to four years. Students planning to apply to schools of veterinary medicine can fulfill preveterinary course requirements at the University of Louisville. Since schools may vary somewhat in their requirements, students interested in making application should select schools to which they have an interest in applying so they can schedule courses to meet requirements for those schools. The University has an approved preveterinary curriculum for Auburn consisting of approximately three to three and a half years of college coursework with a heavy concentration in the natural sciences.

In the event the student is not admitted to professional school, the fourth year may be spent in completing requirements for a bachelor’s degree with biology or chemistry obvious choices. The Graduate Record Exam is required for all Auburn applicants; the Veterinary Admission Test is required for Tuskegee applicants.

Students interested in making application to schools of veterinary medicine should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Pre-Health Professions Advising Committee (http://louisville.edu/a-s/advising) for more information. Open advising sessions are scheduled during the academic year.

 

The Kent School of Social Work

The applicant must be a graduate of an accredited four-year college with a broad background in the liberal arts. A cumulative “B” average is preferred. The student’s intellectual, emotional, and physical capacity to perform graduate work will determine admission. The admissions process includes the preparation of an application form, an autobiographical statement, submission of two certified copies of transcripts of all college work completed, and three letters of reference.

 

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