Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
You are here: Home Campus News Lebanese police to apply skills learned at UofL to refugee camps

Lebanese police to apply skills learned at UofL to refugee camps

by UofL Today last modified Dec 04, 2009 05:16 PM

Twenty-three Lebanese police officers are headed home with memories, certificates, gifts, photos and shopping finds - but their most important souvenirs of a month at UofL will be the skills of community policing.

Lebanese police to apply skills learned at UofL to refugee camps

Louisville mayoral representative Carol Butler presents honorary citizenship to Lebanese police Maj. Dory Nakad during graduation Dec. 4. Southern Police Institute Associate Director Cindy Shain was instrumental in developing the training program at UofL.

 

Those they will use to train fellow Internal Security Forces officers, with the intent that they will be used ultimately to provide security for some of the 12 Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon.

Maj. Dory Nakad and 22 first lieutenants received intensive training in democratic policing in their month at UofL's Southern Police Institute. Classes in topics ranging from ethics to crime prevention to problem-solving were supplemented by course-related field exercises as well as ride-alongs and shadowing of several local law enforcement agencies.

"Every human being has the right to live in our society free from danger and fear," Nakad said during Dec. 4 graduation exercises, adding that the officers from Lebanon's national force will be looking to implement what they have learned and will be "working for peace, security and safety in our community - a community that we belong to together."

SPI Director Tad Hughes praised SPI Associate Director Cindy Shain for drafting the idea for the training as well as much of the organizing and facilitating. UofL's National Crime Prevention Institute Director Marianna Perry, justice administration faculty and UofL Public Safety joined other area law enforcement officers as instructors and participants.

"Through these exchanges leaders in law enforcement have learned they have more similarities than differences," keynote speaker Deborah Keeling, justice administration chair, told participants. "Globalization has promoted partnerships that transcend…boundaries."

The officers' busy schedules also included social and cultural events, including basketball and football games, a horse farm visit and Thanksgiving dinners in the homes of various families.

Document Actions
 
Personal tools