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Powering up research!

The University of Louisville’s new supercomputer—the most powerful computer in Kentucky—was powered up on Jan. 31 in Miller Information Technology Center. It allows university researchers to tackle increasingly complex research problems and positions them to get more funding for projects.

University’s new supercomputer is an important milestone

The University of Louisville’s new supercomputer—the most powerful computer in Kentucky—was powered up on Jan. 31 in Miller Information Technology Center. It allows university researchers to tackle increasingly complex research problems and positions them to get more funding for projects.

"The supercomputer, which will be used almost entirely for research projects, marks an important milestone for UofL as a premier metropolitan research university," says UofL President James Ramsey." It will give us the capacity and power to solve complex research problems more quickly. Also, it dramatically boosts our ability to use visualization in our research. This is especially important for analyzing research data."

Cooling System

With a $2 million price tag, the supercomputer is able to process trillions of calculations per second and has 100 terabytes of usable space (1,000 gigabytes can fit into one terabyte). To make sure that the computer would meet the present and future needs of a "premier metropolitan research university," a team of 11 cross-functional UofL researchers was formed.

"This team worked together for many months to identify what type of computer we should purchase," Ramsey says.

Funding and resources for the supercomputer were made possible through collaboration between Information Technology and the Office of Research, says Ramsey.

"The real momentum for purchasing the supercomputer came about when IT realized that they could turn an underperforming asset into seed money to buy the supercomputer," he says. "Working with the FCC, IT was able to lease unused Educational Broadband Service (EBS) transmission space to an outside vendor.

IT then directed $600,000 from the lease sale toward the supercomputer. The Research Office then came up with the balance of the $2 million.

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