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You are here: Home Spring 2009 Campus Roundup Dentistry

Dentistry

When the UofL School of Dentistry’s current downtown Louisville building was completed in 1970, no dental teaching facility in the country was superior. The equipment and facilities were state-of-the-art, and every modern convenience was included. Students and faculty were proud to learn, teach and practice in the finest classrooms and clinics in the country.

Ensuring another century of superior dental education

When the UofL School of Dentistry’s current downtown Louisville building was completed in 1970, no dental teaching facility in the country was superior. The equipment and facilities were state-of-the-art, and every modern convenience was included. Students and faculty were proud to learn, teach and practice in the finest classrooms and clinics in the country.

But times have changed.

While the teaching and practice of dentistry has progressed greatly over the decades, UofL’s facility on Preston Street has remained largely untouched, says John J. Sauk, dean of the dental school.

Dental Renovation proposal

An artist rendering of major renovations being planned for the UofL School of Denistry in downtown Louisville. Construction is set to begin later this year.

"With the exception of the superb pediatric and orthodontic clinics and a few other areas—which were recently renovated thanks to alumni contributions—the dentistry building, its classrooms, clinics and laboratories are outmoded," Sauk says. "The chairs and patient lights are now 38 years old. Delivery systems, radiography, etc. have all changed."

While the faculty and students have done their best with the equipment available, he continues, the building is in sore need of updating. That’s why the school is planning major renovations, starting this year.

"A renovated building will be a source of pride for the entire School of Dentistry community—students, alumni, faculty and patients—and will help the school continue to attract the best students and faculty," Sauk says.

The school’s plans will allow the building to reflect the caliber, professionalism and dedication of its graduates, he says. Expected enhancements include updates to the infrastructure—air compressors, high-speed evacuators, lighting, air conditioning and heating. New equipment such as chairs, lights, cabinets and touch-screen computer terminals will also be part of the renewal. In addition, the plan calls for clinical education support, which includes 21st century computer programs necessary for education and clinical treatment, paperless records, digital X-rays and improved waiting rooms.

Sauk says the renovations are needed to ensure another century of superior dental education at UofL.

"For 120 years, the UofL School of Dentistry has proudly served the dental profession, the citizens of Kentucky and beyond," Sauk says. "From its former facility at the corner of Brook and Broadway to its present home as part of the dynamic Health Sciences Center campus, a tradition of clinical excellence and service to community has been forged by generations of outstanding alumni.

"Specializing in student-centered education, patient care and research, the dental school’s faculty and staff prepare the professionals of tomorrow with the scientific training, knowledge of leading-edge technology and vision that will serve as a solid foundation for the future."

Construction is set to begin later this year with the tentative completion by 2011. To learn more about this project or how you can support it, contact the School of Dentistry Development Office at 502-852-5537.

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