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Speed School Alumni Update: David Schneider

David SchneiderBy Judi Cooper

In 1980, David Schneider exited Speed School’s doors for the last time as a student. With a master’s degree in electrical engineering in hand, this self-described “extreme introvert” began a 15-year career at General Electric in Louisville working on electronic controls.

Eventually, teaching others to do the job brought out the extrovert in Schneider and motivated him to look outside of G.E. for opportunities that could further fuel his interest in design and teamwork.

Fellow Speed School alumnus Steve Rice called Schneider and told him about up-and-coming Lexmark in Lexington, Ky.

Soon, Schneider and his wife, Janet, relocated.

“I learned so much that first year at Lexmark,” Schneider says. “If you’re good at engineering, you can change jobs and be productive quickly. Supporting success is part of the Lexmark culture. People here bend over backwards to help you.”

Schneider speaks with as much pride about his employer as he does the products he has helped design. Lexmark, he says, “makes things happen—solves problems and has strong community consciousness.”

In 10 years with the company, Schneider has helped design several printers. As chief architect of the most recent innovation in color laser printing, he teamed with about 120 others to produce the smallest color laser printer on the market today.

Schneider is especially proud of the company’s new C540 Series of printers for small business work groups or busy offices. He touts
the product's advantages of size, cost and quality, and its 25-page-a-minute speed.

“I consider myself very lucky because I’ve gotten to work with all different groups of people from electrical to mechanical to chemical engineers, to physicists to computer science engineers. I have traveled to manufacturing sites, met customers and conducted training on this product around the world.

“I consider myself very lucky because I’ve gotten to work with all different groups of people from electrical to mechanical to chemical engineers, to physicists to computer science engineers. I have traveled to manufacturing sites, met customers and conducted training on this product around the world.

“If I look around at other jobs,“ Schneider adds, “there’s nothing else I’d rather do.”

Looking back to his time at Speed School, Schneider recalls, “It was hard work. In my last two years, I spent all of my waking moments there.” But, it was the hard work combined with the culture of teamwork practiced by faculty and fellow students at Speed that made fond memories for Schneider and prepared him for the career in which he excels today.

For more information on Schneider, his career, and his Lexmark innovation, contact Judi Cooper.

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