Spring 2022

Humanities Courses

An introduction to critical thinking about world culture through selected readings in major literary forms from ancient times to 1700.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 101-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION E. O’Reilly

An introduction to critical thinking about world culture through selected readings in major literary forms since 1700.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 102-01 MWF 09:00am–09:50am K. Green

This course is an introduction to Comparative Humanities, offering an array of humanities disciplines and creating genres through global and diverse cultures.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 105-01 MWF 09:00am–09:50am D. Wilder
HUM 105-03 MWF 11:00am–11:50am J. Richie
HUM 105-04 MWF 12:00pm–12:50pm S. Dave
HUM 105-05 MWF 01:00pm–01:50pm F. Schildknecht
HUM 105-06 TTh 09:30am–10:45am R. Ismaila
HUM 105-07 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm C. Stewart
HUM 105-08 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm E. Ghita
HUM 105-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION J. Cresseveur
HUM 105-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) J. Cresseveur
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

Introduction to the fundamental vocabulary, principles, analytical processes, and styles of the creative arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, and the printed image), with an emphasis on the performing arts (theatre, dance, music, film, and television). The course will include a variety of individual and group activities focused on creativity and performance in the classroom and in the community.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 151-01 T 04:00pm–06:45pm K. Hill

Interdisciplinary study of the arts and humanities in contemporary American culture emphasizing the convergence of European, African, Hispanic, Asian, and indigenous cultures, as well as the distinguishing characteristics of each culture as revealed in three of the following areas: fine arts, drama, literature, philosophy, religion, and popular entertainment.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 152-01 (HONORS) MWF 11:00am–11:50am M. Johmann
Note: This section is restricted to students active in the University Honors Program. Please call Honors at 502-852-6293 for more information.
HUM 152-02 MWF 11:00am–11:50am K. Hill
HUM 152-03 MWF 01:00pm–01:50pm E. Glass
HUM 152-04 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm J. Fraley
HUM 152-05 TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm A. Miles
HUM 152-06 W 04:00pm–06:45pm D. Carpenter
HUM 152-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION E. Glass
HUM 152-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) J. Fraley
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

The study of the principal world religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and indigenous traditions) in their cultural contexts.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 216-01 MWF 09:00am–09:50am E. Denton
HUM 216-02 TTh 09:30am–10:45am R. Fuller
HUM 216-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION T. Burden
HUM 216-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) M. Hagan
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

A survey of the history, beliefs, and sacred literatures of the religions of South and East Asia from the perspectives of the humanities and the history of religions.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 218-01 (HONORS) TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm M. Hagan
Note: This section is restricted to students active in the University Honors Program. Please call Honors at 502-852-6293 for more information.
HUM 218-02 TTh 09:30am–10:45am M. Hagan

A comparative introduction to Western world religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) through a systematic survey of history, scripture and interpretation, doctrine, practice, and aspects of religious material and literary culture.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 219-01 (HONORS) TTh 11:00am–12:15pm W. Simpson
Note: This section is restricted to students active in the University Honors Program. Please call Honors at 502-852-6293 for more information.

Introduction to the fundamentals of film form and film content, including narrative, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, genre, acting, and sound, with emphasis on relationships between these elements and diverse cultural contexts.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 224-01 MW 04:00pm–05:15pm E. Shoemaker
HUM 224-02 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm B. Kilpatrick
HUM 224-03 Th 04:00pm–06:45pm M. Mooser
HUM 224-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION L. Mercer
HUM 224-80 S 09:00am–11:45am M. Mooser

An introduction to the principal ideas and artistic forms of the modern period (mid-nineteenth to early twenty-first century), as we see them through painting, prose fiction, and film. Special focus on the sense of the uncanny and estrangement that characterizes much of twentieth-century artistic expression. Weird stuff from a weird century. Three short papers and lively discussion.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 304-01 MWF 11:00am–11:50am M. Williams

The interdisciplinary study of religion as a cultural phenomenon, with emphasis on individual, social, mythic, literary, and textual manifestations.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 308-01 TTh 09:30am–10:45am K. Kleinkopf

This course examines the intersections of religion and culture. It does not focus on religious texts; instead, its focus is on how religion plays a part in people’s everyday lives as a source of meaning and order, as well as by creating a nexus of rituals, communities, spaces, and identities. It analyzes world religion (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), as well as local and indigenous religious traditions from a cultural perspective.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 310-01 MWF 10:00am–10:50am N. Polzer

Study of the canonical and apocryphal books of the New Testament as an expression of the world outlook of the primitive Christian community.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 312-01 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm K. Kleinkopf

A survey of Buddhist sacred texts ranging from canonical scriptures to apocrypha and esoteric manuals selected from major Asian and/or East Asian Buddhist traditions, as an introduction to a range of Buddhist beliefs and practices that represent both established Buddhist orthodoxies and popular tradition operating at their periphery.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 314-01 MWF 11:00am–11:50am P. Pranke
Note: Co-listed with AST 390-01.

A study of important Islamic movements and thinkers in the Indian subcontinent, Egypt, and Turkey, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 316-01 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm M. Moazzen

An introduction to twentieth-century fiction, featuring a global array of novels and short stories. Years ago, this class was primarily European fiction, but we’ve expanded our horizons to include works from Asia, Africa, and the Americas. We’ll also look at certain non-establishment trends in fictional art, from magical realism and the gothic all the way to science fiction. Three short papers and lively discussion.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 322-01 MWF 10:00am–10:50am M. Williams

A film theory course that introduces students to theoretical approaches to cinema that may include structuralism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, and post-structuralism, as well as historical, cultural, and gender theory.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 324-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION A. Hall

Offers students the opportunity to study a specific group of films in greater depth. Topics could include a focus on genre (e.g., rom com, mystery, film noir), or the course could focus on a particular theme (e.g., food and film, war and film).

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Note: May be repeated up to three times if different selections of films are studied.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 326-01 African American Films and Filmmakers T 04:00pm–06:45pm (REMOTE) W. Lee

The goal of the course is to critically examine the history, culture, politics, concepts, and issues related to African/Black people and film. Films studied may include The Birth of a Nation (1915), Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971), Blazing Saddles (1974), Foxy Brown (1974), Do the Right Thing (1989), and Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999).

Note: This section will be 100% digital instruction with synchronous sessions available at the time and days designated in the schedule of classes. For this section's specific course expectations and requirements, please consult the course syllabus, which can be viewed in BlackBoard.

Analysis of sex roles as embodied in classic works in philosophy, literature, history, drama, and art in ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary times.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 331-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION J. White
Note: Cross-listed with WGST 303-50.

An introduction to Christian thought and issues through a study of the writings of modern Christian thinkers.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 335-01 TTh 09:30am–10:45am D. Penwell

Mythology of Greek gods and goddesses through the study of ancient texts, major sites of worship, and ancient representations of these deities.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 338-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION S. Watkins
HUM 338-51 DISTANCE EDUCATION (2ND HALF) S. Watkins
Note: This section does not follow regular semester dates. It meets during the second half of the semester.

Study of the Confucian, Taoist, Buddhist, and Shinto traditions and their interrelationships with the cultures of China, Korea, and Japan.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 343-01 MWF 02:00pm–02:50pm P. Pranke
Note: Cross-listed with AST 343-01.

The varieties of religious experience in the United States: native traditions, manifestations and adaptations of Christianity, and other religions practiced in the United States.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 344-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION T. Burden

This course discusses various African understandings of religion by examining specific traditions, beliefs, and practices from Ancient Egyptians, Yoruba, Dogon, and Dagara, among others. Christianity and Islam are discussed as unique parts of the African religious experience.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 351-50 DISTANCE EDUCATION C. McAllister
Note: Cross-listed with PAS 351-01.

Close study of selected great works in their cultural context.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 357-01 TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm M. Johmann

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 361-01 Renegade Thinkers TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm M. Hagan

Throughout the history of philosophy, there have been many “renegade” thinkers that deterritorialize the ground of the canonical works and the personas of the academic tradition. Students will examine the works of several renegade thinkers, including Diogenes, Ken Kesey, Robert Anton Wilson, Aldous Huxley, Philip K. Dick, Timothy Leary, Alan Watts, and Ken Wilber. We will investigate the syncretic and interdisciplinary aspects of each philosopher, as well as their relationship with the canonical works and personas.

HUM 361-02 The Literature of the Holocaust TTh 11:00am–12:15pm R. Omer-Sherman

In studying fictional, poetic and nonfictional narratives of the Holocaust, our task will be to witness the event through the texts we read: What does it mean to think of literature as a kind of witnessing? And just what are the limits of language in representing such an unrepresentable event? For the writer, there is a very real crisis of representation. In The Story of a Life, Aharon Appelfeld, the Israeli novelist and Holocaust survivor, describes the feeling of being defeated by his own story: “Every time you talk about those days, you feel that this is incredible. You tell and you don’t believe that this happened to you. This is one of the most humiliating feelings that I’ve experienced.” And Charlotte Delbo testifies that “Auschwitz is there, fixed and unchangeable, but wrapped in the impervious skin of memory that segregates itself from the present ‘me.’” Included in the argument of this course is the idea that literature can and does respond vigorously to catastrophe. Our main focus will emphasize the roles of silence, memory, identity, and problems of representation, but we will also consider other issues along the way, such as the psychology and history of antisemitism, as well as the problem of articulating a new ethics for humanity. Drawing from European, American, and Israeli narratives, our readings will introduce some of the significant poets and writers who were witnesses to, survivors of, and in some instances victims of the Holocaust. Later in the semester, we will encounter narratives by Ozick, Spiegelman, Semel, and others, a second generation whose work is distinguished by a tension between the desire to write about the Holocaust and guilt at doing so. What does it mean to be the child or even grandchild of a survivor? What will the collective memory of the Holocaust be in the twenty-first century, after the last survivors have given testimony? The way that Jews and others deal with the Holocaust is not always wise. Sometimes we manipulate it, turning Holocaust-related fears into an outlook and a value system. Time and again, we discover that, whether we want it or not, nearly every one of us is a carrier pigeon of the Holocaust. So it is worth coming to terms with it more consciously. As Ecclesiastes (1:18) tells us: “For in much wisdom [is] much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.”

Note: Co-listed with ENGL 372-02.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 362-01 Reading the Hebrew Bible as Literature/The Hebrew Bible in Contemporary Literature TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm R. Omer-Sherman

Many of us think that we somehow know what is in the Bible, even if we rarely encounter it directly. Yet when we do read it, we can sometimes be shocked anew by both its violence and moral energy, the myriad ways that it radiates human suffering, outrage, and spiritual insight, and sometimes even stupefies us with what can seem a bleak portrait of human (and perhaps divine) failings. As Matti Friedman says, “I loved Bible stories as a kid for the same reason that my kids love them now—because they’re not stories for kids.”

This course is also intended as an immersion in contemporary biblical interpretation, as well as contemporary secular and literary uses of the two-thousand-year-old tradition of midrash, with which the ancient rabbinic interpreters sought to provide fresh interpretation and meaning in contexts relevant to their present moment. Traditional midrash includes many opinions on a single verse often in dialogue or disagreement, an inherently democratic discourse. This traditional variant of storytelling is a close relative of intertextuality, which theorist Susan Handelman aptly describes: “Texts echo, interact, and interpenetrate.” In this class, we will also explore representative examples of how the modern literary imagination (poetry, stories, and a novel) responds to ancient stories and uncovers fresh and often disturbing truths there by brushing those sources up against contemporary realities. Particular attention will be given to identifying and studying specific biblical passages, stories, symbols, and motifs, as they are used today by fiction writers and poets. Especially for feminist writers, the midrash proves an irresistible genre. Given the paucity of women’s voices in the biblical text, the midrash genre, simultaneously modern and traditional, is an ideal outlet for feminist exploration.

Note: Co-listed with ENGL 371-01.
HUM 362-50 Race, Gender, and Human Behaviors DISTANCE EDUCATION L. Anthony

The course is an elective that examines human behaviors in relation to race and gender from psychological, sociological, and technological perspectives. These perspectives will be viewed in terms of contemporary societies throughout the African diaspora. At the end of the term, students will demonstrate their knowledge by creating a presentation for an adverse audience while taking a supportive position of a social issue relating to race and/or gender.

Note: Co-listed with PAS 300-50 and WGST 391-50.

Notes: (1) May be repeated when topics vary. (2) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 363-01 Race, Racism, and Judaism TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm A. Angermann

What are the meanings of race and racism in Jewish culture, history, and politics? Are Jews an ethnic or racial minority? Is antisemitism a form of racism? Is Zionism a form of racism? Does Jewish ethics include a commitment to racial justice? What is the history of the relations between African Americans and American Jews? Who are the Black Jews, Arab Jews, and Indian Jews? This course discusses these questions by exploring various perspectives on race and racism in Jewish, Black, and other cultures, histories, and politics—from the Hebrew Bible up to most recent social and political events and their reflection in media and film.

HUM 363-50 Gender and Social Media DISTANCE EDUCATION F. Freibert
Note: Co-listed with WGST 393-50.

A study of the historical events, with analysis and evaluation of the impact of the Holocaust and other modern global genocides on humanistic thought and imagination.

Note: Credit may not be received for this course and HIST 387.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 387-01 MWF 11:00am–11:50am M. Blum
Note: Cross-listed with HIST 387-01.

A survey of major theories and methodologies in the academic study of religion from a historical perspective.

Prerequisites: Completion of 90 hours and permission of instructor.

Notes: (1) Credit may not be earned for both HUM 510 and HUM 610. (2) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). (3) This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 510-01 MW 01:00pm–02:15pm N. Polzer
Note: Co-listed with HUM 610-01.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 561-01 Critical Social Theory Th 04:00pm–06:45pm A. Angermann

Critical theory is a school of thought and a methodical approach which examines the interrelations of abstract thinking and concrete social reality. It questions the conceptual frame within which we perceive the reality we live in and seeks to detect the underlying social and ideological mechanisms that often lead to irrationality, injustice, and oppression. Integrating elements from philosophy, psychology, sociology, political economy, aesthetics, and film theory, Critical Theory provides an interdisciplinary analysis of the meaning of progress, freedom, individuality, ideology, and technology, by studying phenomena such as alienation, reification, authoritarianism, prejudice, and racism.

Developed in the 1930s by a group of German-Jewish thinkers, such as Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, Marcuse, and Fromm, together known as the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory, at first in Germany and later in the US, Critical Theory has always responded to social, cultural, and political developments—and their impact by and on individual life, consciousness, and agency. This course largely focuses on the main writings of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory, but it begins by exploring foundational texts in social thought by Hegel, Marx, and Lukács, and it concludes by discussing the significance and implications of Critical Theory for feminism, gender and queer theory, and critical race theory.

Note: Co-listed with HUM 673-01, PHIL 538-01, PHIL 638-01, and SCHG 538-01.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 562-02 Translation and Migration TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm S. Bertacco

This course will explore the crucial connections between translation and migration in contemporary global culture from an interdisciplinary humanities perspective. In our discussions, we will often draw on our familiarity with languages other than English, but knowledge of another language is not required for the course.

Migration and translation are distinct yet closely linked phenomena. They both relate to forms of mobility which deeply affect human lives and human cultures. In today’s political and cultural debate, translation often offers a generative as well as anxiety-producing metaphor to talk about migration as in the case of “relocations” or “translated people.” But there is a huge difference between “manipulating,” “translating,” or “betraying” ideas, words, or texts and doing the same with human beings. How does the idea of translation change when it is seen from the vantage point of migration and understood as a practical, political, and ethical matter rather than a purely linguistic one?

Drawing on an interdisciplinary corpus of texts and scholarship ranging from nonfiction to poetry, from art to film, and from translation studies, migration studies, postcolonial studies, anthropology, and sociology, we will study how translation affects the lives of those who move and settle in other cultures and how, in turn, migration affects modes of language, identity, and belonging. Our reflection will focus on Europe and the Mediterranean, on the one hand, and on North and Central America, on the other.

Primary Texts
Jenny Erpenbeck, Go, Went, Gone, trans. Susan Bernofsky (New Directions, 2017).
Emily Jacir, John Lansdowne, and Christopher MacEvitt, Translatio (excerpts) (Neri Pozza, 2016).
Valeria Luiselli, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions (Coffee House, 2017).
Sara Uribe, Antígona González, trans. John Pluecker (Les Figues, 2016).
Jeanine Cummins, American Dirt (Flatiron Books, 2020).

Note: Co-listed with HUM 682-02 and WGST 692-01.

Notes: (1) May be repeated up to three times under different topics. (2) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 590-01 The Modern Fantastic MW 02:00pm–03:15pm M. Williams

A survey of the fantastic in literature and film, taught by a fantasy/magical-realist novelist. We’ll look at various types and patterns of fantasy, consider how these works arise from their very real cultural and historical contexts, and throughout the class, entertain the big question why the fantastic is so often the best way to tell about our experience in chaotic, crazy times. Four short papers and lively discussion.

HUM 590-02 Utopias/Dystopias MWF 09:00am–09:50am M. Johmann

The dream of utopia is perhaps as old as humanity itself. Coined by Thomas More in the sixteenth century, “utopia” has come to refer to the quest for the ideal society, that “good place” where all the evils of human civilization have been purged and people are free to live in peace, harmony, and security. The literature of utopia is vast. From the Garden of Eden and Hesiod’s “Golden Age” to Marxist political theory and the first architectural plans for Disney World, humans have dreamed the dream of utopia in an endless series of variations, each dream unique to the dreamer and to the time and place of its making. This course proposes to survey the utopian dream as it unfolds in Western culture. Beginning with More’s Utopia and continuing into the twentieth century, we will explore a sampling of utopian thought and consider in particular the ways in which utopian dreams have become the very real foundation of American life. We will also examine the darker version of utopian literature, the dystopian novel, which portrays cultures and civilizations that are the complete reverse of the “good place” in the author’s way of thinking. Ranging from H. G. Wells’s The Time Machine to Orwell’s 1984 and Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, we will discuss why dystopian literature has become much more common and popular in contemporary culture than its more optimistic cousin, the utopian novel. Where possible we will compare the literary visions of these works to representations in film and on television.

The study of major systematic views of the development on Western culture.

Prerequisite: Completion of 75 undergraduate hours.

Notes: (1) Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). (2) Credit may not be received for this course and HIST 595.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 595-01 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm M. Johmann

A survey of major theories and methodologies in the academic study of religion from a historical perspective.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both HUM 510 and HUM 610.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 610-01 MW 01:00pm–02:15pm N. Polzer
Note: Co-listed with HUM 510-01.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Note: May be repeated up to three times for different topics.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 635-75 Theory of Repulsion and Disgust W 05:30pm–08:15pm N. Polzer

Advanced exploration of contributions to thought and the arts from those sectors of global society often overlooked: indigenous peoples and peoples of the conceptual East and South. Rather than progressing through historical periods, the course materials are arranged analytically, by theme, such as difference, empire, migration, and adaptation.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
HUM 663-01 T 04:00pm–06:45pm M. Moazzen
G. Hutcheson

Exploration of advanced theory regarding the formation and maintenance of, and issues in, culture from a social perspective.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 673-01 Critical Social Theory Th 04:00pm–06:45pm A. Angermann

Critical theory is a school of thought and a methodical approach which examines the interrelations of abstract thinking and concrete social reality. It questions the conceptual frame within which we perceive the reality we live in and seeks to detect the underlying social and ideological mechanisms that often lead to irrationality, injustice, and oppression. Integrating elements from philosophy, psychology, sociology, political economy, aesthetics, and film theory, Critical Theory provides an interdisciplinary analysis of the meaning of progress, freedom, individuality, ideology, and technology, by studying phenomena such as alienation, reification, authoritarianism, prejudice, and racism.

Developed in the 1930s by a group of German-Jewish thinkers, such as Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, Marcuse, and Fromm, together known as the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory, at first in Germany and later in the US, Critical Theory has always responded to social, cultural, and political developments—and their impact by and on individual life, consciousness, and agency. This course largely focuses on the main writings of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory, but it begins by exploring foundational texts in social thought by Hegel, Marx, and Lukács, and it concludes by discussing the significance and implications of Critical Theory for feminism, gender and queer theory, and critical race theory.

Note: Co-listed with HUM 561-01, PHIL 538-01, PHIL 638-01, and SCHG 538-01.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Note: May be repeated up to a maximum of five times.

Course/Section Topic Days/Times Instructor
HUM 682-02 Translation and Migration TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm S. Bertacco

This course will explore the crucial connections between translation and migration in contemporary global culture from an interdisciplinary humanities perspective. In our discussions, we will often draw on our familiarity with languages other than English, but knowledge of another language is not required for the course.

Migration and translation are distinct yet closely linked phenomena. They both relate to forms of mobility which deeply affect human lives and human cultures. In today’s political and cultural debate, translation often offers a generative as well as anxiety-producing metaphor to talk about migration as in the case of “relocations” or “translated people.” But there is a huge difference between “manipulating,” “translating,” or “betraying” ideas, words, or texts and doing the same with human beings. How does the idea of translation change when it is seen from the vantage point of migration and understood as a practical, political, and ethical matter rather than a purely linguistic one?

Drawing on an interdisciplinary corpus of texts and scholarship ranging from nonfiction to poetry, from art to film, and from translation studies, migration studies, postcolonial studies, anthropology, and sociology, we will study how translation affects the lives of those who move and settle in other cultures and how, in turn, migration affects modes of language, identity, and belonging. Our reflection will focus on Europe and the Mediterranean, on the one hand, and on North and Central America, on the other.

Primary Texts
Jenny Erpenbeck, Go, Went, Gone, trans. Susan Bernofsky (New Directions, 2017).
Emily Jacir, John Lansdowne, and Christopher MacEvitt, Translatio (excerpts) (Neri Pozza, 2016).
Valeria Luiselli, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions (Coffee House, 2017).
Sara Uribe, Antígona González, trans. John Pluecker (Les Figues, 2016).
Jeanine Cummins, American Dirt (Flatiron Books, 2020).

Note: Co-listed with HUM 562-02 and WGST 692-01.

Linguistics Courses

Introduction to the basic assumptions, methods, and concepts of studying language, focusing on the way language influences human experience and the organization of human behavior. Examines the nature, structure, and use of language. May apply as elective in either Social Sciences or Humanities, meeting divisional or out-of-divisional requirements.

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 105.

Note: Students with credit for LING 518/ENGL 518 may not take this course.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 325-01 MWF 12:00pm–12:50pm T. Stewart
Note: Cross-listed with ENGL 325-01.

An ethnographic perspective to the study of language, investigating how it is used to create and maintain social institutions and rituals, and how it is differentiated across genders and ethnicities.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 330-01 TTh 01:00pm–02:15pm H. Cruz
Note: Cross-listed with ANTH 343-01 and ENGL 330-01.

Philosophical problems concerning language, such as meaning, use reference, private language, and their interrelation.

Prerequisite: LING 325 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 341-02 TTh 11:00am–12:15pm G. Dove
Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 341-02.

In linguistics, morphology focuses on the ways that words are related to meaning or grammatical function may also show similarities in their form. These similarities are seen especially in how the parts of words are put together (roots, prefixes, suffixes), but morphology also considers many other marking systems found across the world’s languages.

Prerequisite: LING 325 or ENGL 325 or equivalent.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 507-01 MW 04:00pm–05:15pm T. Stewart
Note: Cross-listed with LING 607-01.

Examination of the structure of modern English language; emphasis on grammatical terminology and systems of classification. Students collect and analyze linguistic examples, spoken and written. Recommended for prospective English teachers.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; ENGL 102 or ENGL 105.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 522-01 MW 02:00pm–03:15pm T. Stewart
Note: Cross-listed with ENGL 522-01.

Psychological aspects of language and their significance for analysis and understanding of cognitive and social processes.

Prerequisite: PSYC 307 or ENGL 325 or LING 325 or LING 518.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 524-01 TTh 02:30pm–03:45pm M. Kondaurova
Note: Cross-listed with PSYC 524-01.

An introduction to the social systems and language varieties found across societies. Additionally, students will objectively explore both linguistic and social norms.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; LING 325 or ENGL 325 for undergraduates.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 570-01 Th 04:00pm–06:45pm H. Cruz
Note: Cross-listed with ENGL 570-01.

In linguistics, morphology focuses on the ways that words are related to meaning or grammatical function may also show similarities in their form. These similarities are seen especially in how the parts of words are put together (roots, prefixes, suffixes), but morphology also considers many other marking systems found across the world’s languages.

Course/Section Days/Times Instructor
LING 607-01 MW 04:00pm–05:15pm T. Stewart
Note: Cross-listed with LING 507-01.