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Autism Spectrum Disorders: ASD, Diagnosis, & Screening

First Signs

The First Signs website provides a wealth of vital resources, covering a range of issues: from monitoring development, to concerns about a child; from the screening and referral process, to sharing concerns. We invite you to explore our website in your search for answers. Our organization aims to educate parents, healthcare providers, early childhood educators, and other professionals to ensure the best developmental outcome for every child. Our goals are to improve screening and referral practices and to lower the age at which young children are identified with developmental delays and disorders.

Learn the Signs. Act Early

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), in collaboration with a number of national partners, launched a public awareness campaign called "Learn the Signs. Act Early." The campaign aims to educate parents about childhood development, including early warning signs of autism and other developmental disorders, and encourages developmental screening and intervention.

The Centers for Disease Control

Welcome to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For over 60 years, CDC has been dedicated to protecting health and promoting quality of life through the prevention and control of disease, injury, and disability. We are committed to programs that reduce the health and economic consequences of the leading causes of death and disability, thereby ensuring a long, productive, healthy life for all people. (Search: autism and act early)

National Institute of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development

The NICHD was initially established to investigate the broad aspects of human development as a means of understanding developmental disabilities, including intellectual and developmental disabilities, and the events that occur during pregnancy. Today, the Institute conducts and supports research on all stages of human development, from preconception to adulthood, to better understand the health of children, adults, families, and communities. (Search: ASD, autism, or autism spectrum disorders; select first result)

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

The mission of NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure. For the Institute to continue fulfilling this vital public health mission, it must foster innovative thinking and ensure that a full array of novel scientific perspectives are used to further discovery in the evolving science of brain, behavior, and experience. In this way, breakthroughs in science can become breakthroughs for all people with mental illnesses.

American Academy of Pediatrics

Welcome to the official Web site of the American Academy of Pediatrics—an organization of 60,000 pediatricians committed to the attainment of optimal physical, mental, and social health and well being for all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Whether you're looking for general information related to child health or for more specific guidelines concerning a pediatric issue, you've come to the right place. Here, you'll find information regarding the Academy's many programs and activities...our policies and guidelines...our publications and other child health resources...and much, much more. Best of all, you can rest assured that the information comes from the nation's leading child health experts and that we have scientific research supporting our recommendations. (Search: autism; click first link in results list)

National Human Genome Research Institute of National Institutes of Health

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) led the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) contribution to the International Human Genome Project, which had as its primary goal the sequencing of the human genome. This project was successfully completed in April 2003. Now, the NHGRI's mission has expanded to encompass a broad range of studies aimed at understanding the structure and function of the human genome and its role in health and disease.

To that end NHGRI supports the development of resources and technology that will accelerate genome research and its application to human health. A critical part of the NHGRI mission continues to be the study of the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of genome research. NHGRI also supports the training of investigators and the dissemination of genome information to the public and to health professionals.

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