Part-Time Faculty Institute

Part-Time Faculty InstitutePart-time faculty can enhance their teaching skills, meet and enjoy a light meal with colleagues, and earn a stipend by participating in the Part-Time Faculty Institute (PTFI), a program designed especially for the needs of part-time faculty. The PTFI provides UofL's part-time faculty with tools and resources to help them become even more effective educators in the classroom. Participants in any of the sessions will find them beneficial to their teaching. The Institute offers four two-hour sessions each academic semester. We are delighted to announce that "Implementing Active Learning: From Theory to Practice" is the theme for this year's PTFI.

What is active learning?

Active learning is generally defined as any instructional method that engages students in the learning process. Active learning is often contrasted with lecture/content delivery teaching practices. Active learning requires students to do meaningful learning activities and think about what they are doing, also known as metacognition.

Two definitions from leading scholars on active learning:

From Michael Wesch (2010): “In a world of nearly infinite information, we must first address why, facilitate how, and let the what generate naturally from there. (“From knowledgeable to knowledge-able learning in new media environments”)

From Bonwell and Eison (1991): Active learning “involves students in doing things and thinking about what they are doing.”

Why does active learning work? What are the benefits for students and faculty?

Active learning approaches focus more on developing students’ skills than on transmitting information and require that students do something—read, discuss, write—that requires higher-order thinking. These approaches also tend to emphasize students’ explorations of their own attitudes and values. Research and evidence regarding the effectively of active learning approaches on student learning is robust and stretches back more than thirty years.

Part-Time Faculty InstituteThis year, each 2-hour PTFI session will focus on deepening the capacity for part-time faculty to engage in active learning with their teaching. Each semester four topics related to active learning will be offered:

  • Theory and evidence for why and how active learning works
  • Technologies and tools to support and promote active learning (for face-to-face, online, and hybrid instruction)
  • Instructional practices for active learning
  • Showcase of sharing of best classroom strategies for active learning

Schedule

All sessions meet Thrusdays, 5:30-7:30 p.m. with a light meal available at 5 p.m.
Sessions meet on Belknap Campus in the Delphi Lab, Ekstrom Library (2nd Floor). We can provide a parking pass if you park at the Speed Museum garage, located next to Ekstrom Library.
  • Click to Show/HideSeptember 7
    Introduction to Active Learning

    What is active learning? Active learning is instruction that involves students engaging activity during instruction, rather than them passively listening or watching. Lecturing, leading discussions, and setting up small group work all are passive teaching techniques. An instructional strategy, on the other hand, is a set of learning activities arranged in a particular sequence so that the energy for learning increases and accumulates as students go through the sequence.

    Participants will be introduced to the principles of active learning and engage in practices to support students’ active learning, including gathering ideas for incorporating active learning into their teaching. Examples of these practices include exam wrappers, test taking teams, structured problem solving, and role play.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Consider a way to frame “active learning” as an instructional strategy;
    • Develop a set of practices you can use to encourage students to learn “better”; and
    • Identify 2-3 teaching strategies to “activate learning” in your next course meeting.

    Presenters:

    Jennifer Anderson, Ph.D., Program Director, Teaching Innovation Learning Lab

    Nisha Gupta, Ph.D., Specialist for Faculty Development

  • Click to Show/HideSeptember 28
    Tools for Active Learning I: Focus on Media Creation and Storage

    This workshop aims to introduce participants to active learning tools that can be incorporated easily into both face-to-face and online courses. In this session, the focus is on media creation and storage. Use of digital tools and media in your courses provide your students with engaging and active ways to share their learning. Presenters will highlight the features of successful digital assignments such as detailed planning, audience awareness, and understanding of the medium.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Identify key features of active learning tools that are media rich;
    • Recognize models of planning and design for media creation; and
    • Explore digital tools that are available to you and your students.

    Presenters:

    Aimee Greene, Assistant Director, Instructional Technology

    Jason Zahrndt, Instructional Technology Specialist

  • Click to Show/HideOctober 12
    The Flipped Classroom Model as Instructional Design for Active Learning

    In this session you will learn about the flipped classroom model of instruction from Speed School faculty member and TILL Faculty Fellow, Jeff Hieb. Jeff has been interested in, and experimenting with, flipped classrooms for more than 5 years and will share his experiences. Following Jeff’s overview of the flipped classroom literature and the related classroom model of instruction, you will work on designing and developing materials for a single flipped class meeting within a course you are teaching this or a subsequent semester.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Compare the research on flipped classrooms and the Flipped Classroom Model in relation to traditional instructional design;
    • Identify important and specific characteristics of the Flipped Classroom Model that make it powerful and compelling;
    • Explain some of the techniques and best-practices that characterize successful flipped classes; and
    • Design and develop materials for flipping a single class meeting in a course you are teaching this or a subsequent semester.

    Presenter:

    Jeff Hieb, Ph.D., TILL Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering Fundamentals at the J.B. Speed School of Engineering

  • Click to Show/HideNovember 16
    Active Learning Strategies Showcase I: Part-Time Faculty “Steal this Idea” Session

    In a shared, round-robin format, seasoned part-time faculty will showcase an active learning strategy that has been effective in their classroom and invite you to “steal it” and make it your own. This session will involve an engaged discussion of teaching techniques, strategies, and insights.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Identify 2-3 teaching ideas to add to your teaching toolbox;
    • Connect with interdisciplinary colleagues about evidence-based teaching; and
    • Provide support and feedback to your fellow part-time colleagues.

    Presenters:

    Part-time faculty who have been practicing active learning strategies and want you to “steal” them for use in your classes!

  • Click to Show/HideJanuary 18
    Theories of Active Learning

    All courses have a rhythm. What are the rhythms of active learning classes? In this session we will explore theories and practices to imagine active learning in relation to course structures. Development of the on-course structure with intentional planning promotes the active nature of the learning. In this session, we will examine the Castle-Top Planning framework and discuss the notion of the “provocative” question as a course structure theory that informs teaching practices.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Identify theories of course design that promote active learning;
    • Practice the Castle-Top template and provocative question modeling; and
    • Identify 1-2 teaching practices to “activate learning” in your next course meeting.

    Presenter:

    Nisha Gupta, Ph.D., Specialist for Faculty Development

  • Click to Show/HideFebruary 22
    Active Learning Tools II: Focus on Student Engagement

    Many of us have had the experience of seeing the “light bulb” turn on in a student’s mind when they finally understand a concept that they struggled to grasp, discover a passion or career because of a class or a lesson, or come to believe in their own learning. Moving students toward engagement in their own learning can be enhanced with active learning tools. In this session, the presenter will help you explore and uncover tools to help foster students’ engagement in their own learning.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Glean ideas and strategies for accessing and using active learning tools for student engagement;
    • Use 1-2 active learning strategies for student engagement:
    • Generate ideas for leveraging the tools with students and applying the concepts to their everyday lives; and
    • Identify possible strategies and approaches for incorporating tools into your own classroom.

    Presenters:

    Aimee Greene, Assistant Director, Instructional Technology

    Alicia Dunlap, Assistant Director Blackboard

  • Click to Show/HideMarch 22
    Using Concept Mapping as an Active Learning Strategy

    Using concept maps may be a familiar strategy for many instructors, but this workshop aims to marry the activity with ideas about active learning. For over four years the presenter has been utilizing collaboration, critical thinking, and reflection practices in conjunction with concept mapping in order to provide a scaffolded approach to meeting course objectives. Through a workshop format, you will practice some basic concept mapping activities and generate ideas for your own courses.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Explore the research on scaffolding and concept mapping;
    • Develop an example of a concept map through practice; and
    • Prepare a model for possible use of concept maps in your own courses.

    Presenter:

    Suzanne Hopf, J.D., Sociology Instructor

  • Click to Show/HideApril 12
    Active Learning Strategies Showcase II: Part-Time Faculty “Steal this Idea” Session

    In a shared, round-robin format, seasoned part-time faculty will showcase an active learning strategy that has been effective in their classroom and invite you to “steal it” and make it your own. This session will involve an engaged discussion of teaching techniques, strategies, and insights.


    Register

    As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

    • Identify 2-3 teaching ideas to add to your teaching toolbox;
    • Connect with interdisciplinary colleagues about evidence-based teaching; and
    • Provide support and feedback to your fellow part-time colleagues.

    Presenters:

    Part-time faculty who have been practicing active learning strategies and want you to “steal” them for use in your classes!


Incentive Payment Process

Part-time faculty who complete three sessions in an academic semester are eligible for a $200 stipend and will receive a certificate of completion confirming participation in the Part-Time Faculty Institute. Successful participants can also request a transcript verifying their participation. No other Delphi program substitutes will be permitted.

Rules for Participation

  1. Participants must complete three of the four sessions within an academic semester (fall or spring) in order to qualify for the stipend. Part-time faculty who successfully complete the semester program will be eligible for a $200 stipend.
  2. Part-time faculty who are already full-time staff, either monthly or classified (hourly), do not qualify for incentives. P&A; staff working at 80% or more and ALL classified (hourly) staff are ineligible for incentives. Participants must be actively teaching at UofL during the semester for which credit towards the incentive is accrued.
  3. A maximum of 25 faculty members may participate in any PTFI session. Participants are accepted on a first-come-first-served basis, via electronic registration.
For more information, contact Nisha Gupta, Specialist for Faculty Development, Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning.
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