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You are here: Home OHS labchemsafe manual Table 1 Common chemicals that form explosive levels of peroxides and their storage limits

Table 1 Common chemicals that form explosive levels of peroxides and their storage limits

by schmidy last modified Aug 16, 2007 07:54 AM



Form potentially explosive peroxides without concentration (a). Dispose or test 3 months after opening.
Form potentially explosive peroxides on concentration (b). Dispose or test 12 months after opening.
Autopolymerize as a result of peroxide accumulation. Dispose or test inhibited materials after 12 months.
Butadiene (c) Acetal Acrylic acid
Chloroprene (d) Acetaldehyde Acrylonitrile
Divinyl acetylene Benzyl alcohol
Butadienee
Chloroprene Isopropyl ether
2-butanol
Tetrafluoroethylene (c) Cyclohexanol Chlorotrifluoroethylene
Vinylidene chloride 2-cyclohexen-1-ol
Methyl
Methacrylate Cumene Stryene
Tetrafluoroethylene Decahydronaphthalene Vinyl acetate

Diacetylene Vinyl acetylene

Dicyclopentadiene Vinyl chloride

Diethyl ether
Vinyl pyridine

Diethylene glycol


Dimethyl ether


Dioxanes

Ethylene glycol dimethyl ether


4-heptanol


Methyl acetylene


Methyl isobutyl ketone


3-methyl-1 butanol


Methyl cyclopentane


2-pentanol


4-penten-1-ol


1-phenylethanol


2-phenylethanol


2-propanol (isoproranol, "IPA")


Tetrahydrofuran


Tetrahydronaphthalene


Vinyl ethers


Other secondary alcohols



(a) Store under nitrogen, if practical.

(b) WARNING! May become unstable if concentrated intentionally or accidentally by user.

(c) When stored as an inhibited liquid monomer.

(d) When stored as a liquid monomer.

(e) When stored as a gas.


R.J. Kelly, “Review of Safety Guidelines for peroxide-forming Organic Chemicals”, Chemical Health & Safety, September/October 1996, pp 28-36.

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