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Easy Relaxation Techniques

 

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Conflicts are inevitably stressful.     Therefore, we could all use some quick relaxation techniques to help us as we deal with disputes with or among others. These activities can be done almost anywhere.

 

Here are some general guidelines for all the exercises that follow:

 

GENERAL GUIDELINES

  1. Get as comfortable as possible.   It isn’t necessary to lie down to do them.
  2. Remain passive.  Whatever thoughts come to mind are fine.   Do not work at it, just let it happen.
  3. Take note of sounds and let them go.  Sounds are a natural part of the environment.
  4. Focus inward on your breathing as a natural, easy process.


WHOLE BODY TENSION

  • Tense every muscle in your body, staying with that tension for as long as you can without feeling any pain.
  • Slowly release the tension and feel it gradually leaving your body.
  • Repeat three times.


IMAGINE AIR AS A CLOUD

  • Open your imagination and focus on your breathing.
  • As your breathing becomes calm and regular, imagine that the air comes to you as a cloud.  It fills you, and then goes out slowly.  You may want to imagine the cloud as a certain color.


PICK A SPOT

  • Start with your body relaxed and your head level.   With your eyes open, pick a spot to focus on.
  • When you’re ready, count backwards starting with five.    As you take each breath, allow your eyes to close gradually.
  • When you get to one, your eyes will be closed.   Focus on your body and how it feels relaxed.


SHOULDER SHRUG

  • Try to raise your shoulders up to your eyes.
  • Hold this position as you count to four.
  • Now drop your shoulders back to a normal position.
  • Repeat three times.


CAT STRETCH

  • Stand with your feet a part slightly.
  • Take a deep breath as you stretch your arms over your head.
  • Lean forward and exhale slowly, as you bring your arms and head down.
  • Repeat slowly five times.

 

 

 

Taken from The Counseling Center and Personal Development Center of Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, PA.

 

 

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