Course Offerings

Current courses offered by the University of Louisville Department of Anthropology.

Fall 2015 Courses

click here for downloadable Summer 2015 and Fall 2015 course listings

 

 

 

 

 

ANTH 201

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

1009-201-01 * TTH 11:00-12:15      LF 225      MARKOWITZ

1681-201-02TTH9:30-10:45        HM 205     ZHAO

9493-201-75M5:30-8:15          TBA          JONES

This course introduces cultural anthropology and surveys its fundamental questions, concepts, methods, and data. The overall question it seeks to answer: what does it mean to be human? To answer this question and many related ones involves learning concepts such as culture, cultural relativism, universalism, evolution, race, gender, and class. The course explores the ways cultural anthropologists develop their research questions and the methods and data they use to answer them. (GEN ED SB CD2)*Honors 201-01.

ANTH 202

INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

1379-202-01

MWF

9:00-9:50

LU 232

PURIFOY

3786-202-02

MW

2:00-3:15

HM 205

TILLQUIST

This course provides a general introduction to biological anthropology through an examination of the place of humans in the animal kingdom, the human evolutionary past, a comparative examination of hominid fossils, and the dynamics of human variation. Specifically, students will demonstrate their ability to relate findings from paleoanthropology to general principals of evolution and biological diversity, and to apply these principles of evolution and biological diversity, and to apply these principles toward explaining questions of hominid evolution, contemporary human biological adaptation, and health. NOTE: ANTH 201 & 202 may be taken in any order.(GEN ED S)

ANTH 203

INTRO WORLD PREHISTORY – SBCD2

9131-203-50*Distance Ed.HOEFER

Introduction to World Prehistory is a global survey of the first 2 million years of human existence for which there are few written records and most of our knowledge comes to us via archaeological investigations.  We will trace the evolution of human culture through time, focusing on well-known archaeological sites.  Some of the most famous sites in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North and South America will be discussed.  Images and films are frequently used so that you may gain a better perspective on these places.  In addition, we will cover the major changes in human physical and cultural evolution, such as hunting, the capacity for abstract thought, the domestication of plants and animals, the rise of state level society and urbanization.  Causes for these changes will be considered in detail. *Distance Ed.

 

ANTH 204

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

1492-204-01

TTH

8:00-9:15

 

DIBLASI

7445-204-02

MWF

10:00-10:50

LU232

TBA

5183-204-50*

 

Distance Ed.

 

DIBLASI

From Heinrich Schleimann’s discovery of Troy to Lara Croft’s adventures, archaeology has sparked the imagination of people over the world. Archaeology enhances people’s lives and society through the many great discoveries about the human past. This course introduces students to the discipline of archaeology and seeks to explain the processes through which archaeologists investigate the past. We will cover the kinds of questions archaeologists ask, how we design and execute research, and how we analyze archaeological materials and data. In this course we will examine a diverse range of topics, present case studies from around the world and give students the tools to critically evaluate many ideas about the past. (GEN ED SB CD1)  *Distance Ed.

ANTH 205 / MUH 205

MUSIC IN WORLD CULTURES

1493-205-01

TTh

1:00-2:15

MB 263

MULHALL

9420-205-02*

TTh

1:00-2:15

TBA

MULHALL

8340-205-75

MW

5:30-6:45

MB 263

MULHALL

Explores musical styles from various non-Western cultures in their own social, cultural, and historical contexts. (GEN ED SB CD1) Cross-listed with MUH 205. *Restricted to non-music majors only.

ANTH 301

ARCHAEOLOGY OF SACRED SITES

9503-314-01

TTh

 

1:00-2:15

TBA

HALE

 

This course examines sacred places worldwide through the material remains that have been excavated, conserved and interpreted by archaeologists. Sacred sites that will be examined in this course range from Stonehenge and Easter Island to the Egyptian Pyramids and the

prehistoric mounds of the Mississippi and Ohio River Valleys.  Important archaeological discoveries show that religious experiences were a vital component of all pre-modern cultures.  This universal religious tradition led directly to the creation of many significant artifacts and monuments, including temples, tombs, and artworks.  Religion is traditionally studied from the perspective of theology, beliefs, and sacred texts.   With a focus on the sites and the material remains, we can find key elements that are common to all world religions.  Among these are feasting, sacrifice, coming-of-age ceremonies, astronomical observations, sacred calendars, encounters with the supernatural, and funeral rites.

ANTH 307 / SCHG 302-02

DARWIN

7348-307-01

MW

4:00-5:15

LU 232

TILLQUIST

Theodosius Dobzhansky has said that “nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.” This course undertakes to read, discuss, and better understand the seminal work in biology: On the Origin of Species, by Charles Darwin. We will review the historical and intellectual milieu of Darwin, appreciate his commitment for finding empirical support for his theory, and disentangle the Gordian knot of social controversy associated with misunderstanding evolution that  DATE \@ "M/d/yy" 3/30/15continues today. Darwin’s work—in its original form—is intellectually challenging and as relevant today as it was in 1859. In this course you will learn and hone critical thinking skills, gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of one of the cornerstones of evolutionary theory (natural selection), and review one of the more interesting cultural conflicts in society today.

ANTH 311

EMERGENCE OF HUMAN CULTURE

9127-311-01

TTH

11:00-12:15

LU232

HAWS

Origins and development of human culture from Paleolithic to 10,000 years ago; early hominid evolution, peopling of the world, Neanderthal behavior and replacement by modern humans; emergence of modern culture. (Ask Haws)

 

ANTH 315

ANTHROPOLOGY OF EUROPE

9126 -315-01MW2:00-3:15 PARKHURST

Basic questions addressed by the course: Is there a definable border to what is Europe and what is not in social and cultural (not to mention geographical and biological) terms? What is shared and what varies among the social, cultural, political, demographic, and economic systems found in space commonly labeled European? Is there a specifically European attitude on questions of “race” and gender, on social class, on citizenship? What are the complications of ethnic and national identities? Can we apply to European settings concepts and methods developed IN Europe for study elsewhere? What does Europe have to do with “America” in historical and contemporary terms? If there is a main lesson to the course, it is that while the category “Europe” has long functioned, for some, as a sweet phantom, and for others as a murderous beast, it is both and neither.  (Shawn)

ANTH 318 / PAS 318

AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL TRADITIONS

5723-318-01

TTH

11:00-12:15

HM 112

JONES

An intensive examination of Afro-American life and culture in the U.S. drawn from historical, archaeological and socio-cultural literature. Attention is given to various systems of adaptation of people of African descent in America, including cultural traditions, urbanization and kinship. Cross-listed with PAS 318.

ANTH 319

CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST

5721-319-01

TTH

2:30-3:45

LU 232

PETEET

An introduction to the basic anthropological concepts and categories of analysis of society, polity, and culture in the Middle East. Focus will be on local level social and cultural processes within a regional and global framework.

ANTH 320

INDIANS NORTH-AMERICA

5832-320-01

TTH

9:30-10:45

LU232

WICHE

A survey of the diversity of North American indigenous people before and after European contact.  The course examines the social, political and economic effects that colonization has had on American Indian nations and how these are being dealt with today.

ANTH 327

FUNDAMENTAL SKELETAL FORENSICS

1367-327-01

TTH

9:30-10:45

 

DIBLASI

Physical evidence is used to determine specific information about a deceased individual.  Emphasis is placed on identification of anatomical parts and distinguishing features to make determination of age, sex, race, stature and pathologies for positive identification.

ANTH 331

COMP RELIGIOUS SYSTEMS

7448-331-01

MWF

11:00-11:5

LU 232

PURIFOY

This course focuses on the variations among ideological systems in various cultures. The major goal is an understanding of the several functions of religion in human life.  This course does not seek to evaluate or to question the truth of any particular religion.  Rather it seeks to understand the place of religious systems in the cultures of the followers.

ANTH 344

ANTHROPOLOGY OF CLOTHING

9128-344-01

TTH

2:30-3:45

 

ZHAO

Class will study how fashion and clothing are a means of understanding culture and identity; explores meaning of production and consumption of clothing globally.

ANTH 352

FOOD AND BODY POLITIC

7347-352-01

TTH

1:00-2:15

HM 112

WICHE

Food and body traces the evolution of the industrial food system in America and the impact this system has on our health, identity, environment, workers’ rights, natural resources, animals, crop diversity and more.

 

ANTH 354

ANTHROPOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES

9563-354-01TTH11:00-12:15        NS 234CRESPO

The main goal of this course is to study how infectious diseases shaped (and still shape) who we are, at the biological and at the cultural level. A bio-cultural approach on past and present infectious diseases will create a more comprehensive and holistic scenario when reconstructing the impact of pathogens on human populations.

ANTH 362

KINSHIP FAMILY REPRODUCTION

9123-362-01

MWF

1:00–1:50

LU 232

NOONAN

In this class, we will trace kinship studies from the early days of anthropology to present day and examine the multiple ways kinship ties are understood to be formed. Analyzing a number of key issues—adoption, reproductive technology, childhood, race and ethnicity, and the family in medical anthropology—we will explore the state of contemporary kinship studies in cultural anthropology.

 

ANTH 364 / 564

LITHICS

9124-364-01MW2:00-3:15        LU 232        TBA

9125-564-01*MW3:30-4:45 TB 001        TBA

*Prerequisite 564: ANTH 202 and 204.This course is intended to provide basic instruction and hands-on experience in the study of stone technology. Students will learn the ways archaeologists use to think about and interpret lithic artifacts. Stone tools and flakes are the most abundant archaeological remains; especially in most prehistoric situations. The course will emphasize the major types found in sites from the Paleolithic through Neolithic, practice and experimentation with flint knapping, as well as problems of analysis and interpretation.

ANTH 508

HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY-WR CUE

3679-508-01

MW

4:00-5:15

 

PARKHURST

 

Prerequisite: Senior Status and 18 hours of Anthropology.Graduate students may not enroll. This class explores the range of questions anthropologists pose and their historical context.  For example, how and why are human groups constructed and how are they similar to and different from one another?

 

ANTH 511

ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODS-WR

4306-511-01TTh1:00-2:15 LU 232      BURNET

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status and 18 hours of Anthro- pology/graduate students cannot enroll in this class. Explores the range of qualitative research methods and techniques. Emphasis is on designing and developing a research project and conducting ethnographic fieldwork.

ANTH 528 / 662

ANIMALS & HUMANS

9098-528-75M5:30-8:15       LU 232        HAWS

9099-662-75 *M5:30-8:15       LU 232        HAWS

*Prerequisite for 662-75: Consent of instructor. This course explores the complex and often contradictory ways that humans interact with animals. We will cover a wide range of topics emerging from a multidisciplinary perspective including the origins of hunting and domestication; modern animal economies; cross-cultural attitudes towards animals; symbolic representations of animals in art, literature, religion and folklore; animals as companions; and the status of animals, both wild and domestic, in contemporary society.

ANTH 540

HEALTH & CIVILIZATION

9129 -540-01

TTH

2:30-3:45

LF 207

CRESPO

Prerequisite: Graduate status.

The central goal of this course is to understand how at multiple bio-cultural levels human populations (past and present) respond to their surroundings, and how their responses can affect the environment and their own adaptation. To achieve this goal, the course will be focused on human lifestyle changes, the emerging of new diseases, and the corresponding adaptations (or misadaptations?) that affected human health during and after the agriculture revolution.

 

 

 

 

ANTH 611

RESEARCH: SOCIAL CULTURE

7447-611-01TTh1:00 – 2:15       LU 232         BURNET

Prerequisite: graduate status. Course focuses on developing a substantive research project in cultural anthropology; students will integrate a literature review, theoretical and methodological approaches, and data collection strategies to produce a research proposal.

ANTH 612

Seminar: CONT. ISSUES IN ANTH: CLIMATE CHANGE

9130-612-01

T

4:00-6:45

LU 232

MARKOWITZ

Prerequisite: Graduate Status. Designed to foster bio-cultural thinking, this class emphasizes the intertwined contributions furnished by the different approaches of archaeology, biological, and cultural anthropology. From year to year, course themes vary, depending on faculty interests and temporal salience. Fall 15: Climate Change.

ANTH 672

GRADUATE THESIS

4447-672-01

TBA

TBA                          TILLQUIST

Prerequisite: Graduate status. Reading, research, and writing of thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION

ANTH 401 CO-OP INTERNSHIP: ANTHROPOLOGY*

ANTH 450 READINGS AND RESEARCH

ANTH 451 INDEPENDENT STUDY

ANTH 499 SENIOR HONORS THESIS