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ALLIED HEALTH DEAN APPOINTED

Roger A. Lanier, an administrator at Texas Tech University of Health Sciences, has been appointed dean of the School of Allied Health Sciences. Lanier, regional dean of the School of Allied Health at Amarillo, has more than 20 years experience as a college educator and has taught in the fields of occupational therapy, health promotion, policy and management, biomedical statistics, and research methods. undergraduate programs include respiratory therapy, medical technology, cytotechnology, nuclear medicine technology, physical therapy, and radiologic technology. Graduate degrees are offered in expressive therapies and, beginning this year, in physical therapy.
Hand Transplant
A team of U of L surgeons plans to transplant a human hand by reconnecting a complex system of bones, blood vessels, tendons, muscles, arteries, and nerves.

U OF L AND JEWISH HOSPITAL PLAN HAND TRANSPLANT

The United States' first successful hand transplant could be performed by U of L surgeons at Jewish Hospital's Kleinert, Kutz and Associates Hand Center before the end of the year. A team of doctors in Lyon, France successfully transplanted the hand and forearm of an Australian man in September, beating the Louisville team to the"world's first" claim. As with other transplants, the replacement hands would be harvested from a living but brain-dead organ donor and surgically attached as soon as possible. The reattaching of traumatically severed limbs is not a new procedure. However, the transplant team anticipates that results could be even better than replantation because the limb will have suffered less trauma and it will have been better preserved prior to the transplant. If successful, the procedure could lead to transplanting skin and underlying structural tissue to burn victims, transplanting missing features to children who were born without them, transplanting joints and muscles, and possibly transplanting partial face and jaw elements to individuals who have been disfigured by severe accidents. The transplant team, which includes U of L faculty members Gordon Tobin, John Barker, Jon Jones, and Warren Breidenbach, is interviewing patients to find a candidate for the first procedure. Once that candidate has been identified, he or she will be listed with the Kentucky Organ Donor Association to be matched with a possible donor. Inquiries about the procedure may be made via the transplant web site, http://www.handtransplant.com or by calling (800) 477-4263.

LOCAL CHILDREN IMPROVE PORTFOLIOS AT U OF L WORKSHOP

The School of Education recently led"You've Got the Write One," a summer portfolio institute where teams of teachers and U of L teacher education students worked for a week with students in grades 4-8 to improve their writing for mathematics and writing portfolios, a part of Kentucky education reform. Associate Dean Beth Stroble, center, worked with two students on logic skills. The annual program is funded by Pepsi-Cola General Bottlers.

U OF L IN THE NEWS

Modern Healthcare - August 24, 1998 Bucks for Brains The health care industry's leading news source reports on Louisville's plans for a research boom:"Thanks to an extraordinary $33 million allocation from the state of Kentucky and unparalleled cooperation among local business, government, and health care leaders, Louisville is poised to leap ahead in the cutthroat competition for biomedical research dollars. Key leaders-from Governor Paul Patton and Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson to U of L President John Shumaker and Douglas Cobb, president of Greater Louisville, Inc.-have made it their goal to rev up Louisville's biomedical engine."

FALL 1998 ENROLLMENT INCREASES

As of the Fall 1998 semester, enrollment at U of L has risen for the first time since 1990 and the freshman class is the university's largest since 1991. The number of students enrolled this fall stands at 20,821, a total that includes 2,142 first-time freshmen and 1,077 new transfer students. The increase is due in part to the Metropolitan College agreement with United Parcel Service, which provides paid tuition and flexible class schedules for workers at the UPS hub; and a newly expanded reciprocity agreement that allows residents of several Kentucky and Indiana counties to take classes across the river without paying out-of-state tuition. Other highlights of fall enrollment include:

  • U of L attracted 16 National Merit Scholars, compared with 13 last fall.
  • Enrollment has risen at the College of Business and Public Administration, Speed Scientific School, the schools of Dentistry and Nursing, and the Brandeis School of Law.
  • Female students make up 50 percent of the incoming freshman class at the School of Medicine, compared with an average of 42.8 percent at medical schools around the nation.
  • The incoming class at the law school has a median LSAT percentile score of 74.9, up from last year's median score of 73.9 and the 1996 median score of 61.2.

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT EXPANSION COMPLETE

The completion of the last two phases of the Emergency Department's $13 million expansion project carries out the School of Medicine's three-part mission to enhance patient care, research, and teaching. Ten years in the planning, the unit"offers the community the best in health care service and technology," says Dan Danzl, chair of U of L's emergency medicine department. The expansion more than doubles the size of the department and the number of patients it can treat each year. New features include"Room 9," where seriously injured patients get immediate trauma care, a separate emergency psychiatric area, and a "First Care" section to treat minor emergencies. The facility has been equipped with several negative pressure rooms which have their own ventilation systems to reduce the risk of spreading airborne diseases. The unit also boasts the state's only hazardous materials decontamination unit attached to a trauma center. Funding for the expansion was provided by University Medical Center, Inc., the consortium of U of L, Jewish Hospital HealthCare Services, and Alliant Health System, which operates University of Louisville Hospital.

U OF L SENDS KIDS BACK TO SCHOOL STOCKED UP

Local children from low-income families went back to school in August loaded up with supplies, thanks to U of L faculty and staff. For the past three years, the Office of Community Relations has run the Operation Backpack program, soliciting donations of cash and supplies from faculty and staff. Over 1,000 items were collected this year, including backpacks, pens and pencils, paper and notebooks, and art supplies.

STADIUM GETS"CHRISTENING" WITH SPECIAL EDITION WINES

Two limited-edition U of L wine bottles are helping to commemorate the opening of Papa John's Cardinal Stadium. Six thousand Cardinal-red bottles of a 1997 California white zinfandel and 1,998 bottles of a"collector's edition" 1995 cabernet sauvignon are selling in local liquor stores. Both are produced by Thoroughbred Vintners of Laconia, Indiana, a company owned by former U of L football player Tod Smyrichinsky '88S and his wife, Rachel Adams-Smyrichinsky. Bottles can be shipped to some states; call (888) 381-WINE.

U OF L ONLINE

Visit the university's Development home page for an update on the Bicentennial Capital Campaign, or for information on the U of L Foundation, methods of giving, donor benefits, or staff assistance. Go to http://www.louisville.edu/alumni/dev/.

GRANT AIDS WESTERN LOUISVILLE DEVELOPMENT

A $400,000 federal grant will allow U of L to expand its urban development efforts in western Louisville. The funding helps the university continue projects initiated through its Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods (SUN), which received $1.6 million from the U.S. Department of Education three years ago. John Gilderbloom, director of the SUN project, says the new money will be used to train residents for home ownership, attract new business, and promote the use of recyclable building materials. The Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded $7 million to 18 universities to help revitalize low-income neighborhoods. U of L is the only school in Kentucky or Indiana to receive one of the grants.

LOGISTICS INSTITUTE LAUNCHED

U of L's newly formed Logistics and Distribution Institute (LoDI) will serve as a source of advice and information on logistics-a field that incorporates all of the steps involved in planning, making and delivering a product-and a provider of expertise to regional businesses and industries. Unlike logistics programs at other universities that are generally based in engineering schools, the U of L institute will encompass engineering, business, applied mathematics and operations research, and information systems. Hokey Min, a professor of business logistics at Auburn University, has been named director of LoDI. His duties will include securing funding for endowed chairs in the four disciplines that make up the institute, and creating relationships with local businesses with the help of U of L faculty and administration.

STATE'S "BUCKS FOR BRAINS" PROGRAM BOOSTS U OF L RESEARCH

State efforts to heighten the status of Kentucky schools as research institutions has translated into a big boost for U of L's Challenge for Excellence. Governor Paul Patton recently endorsed a Kentucky Council on Post Secondary Education plan, now called "Bucks for Brains," which earmarks $33 million in state funds for U of L research. The university must match each state dollar with a dollar of private funding, creating a $66 million pool and funding as many as 33 new endowed chairs. Alliant Health System and Jewish Hospital HealthCare Services have agreed to help raise matching money through their own fund-raising arms. A total of $110 million has been promised to state schools through the "Bucks for Brains" initiative. In addition to the $33 million for U of L, the University of Kentucky will receive $66 million; the remaining $10 million will be divided among the other postsecondary institutions around the state.