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PENNSYLVANIA TEAM BRINGS WORLD-CLASS RESEARCH TO U OF L

A surgeon and pioneer in the use of bone marrow transplants will move her internationally respected medical research team to U of L's Health Sciences Center. Suzanne Ildstad, director of the Institute for Cellular Therapeutics at Allegheny University of the Health Sciences in Philadelphia, will bring the institute to U of L, along with six faculty members and about 30 research, technical, and administrative staff. She will also occupy an endowed professorship in surgery at U of L. Ildstad's research focuses on making bone-marrow transplants safer and more accessible, which could help to treat a wide array of diseases ranging from leukemia to AIDS. The team will be supported by an endowment that includes $4 million from Governor Paul Patton's "Bucks for Brains" program to advance higher education and $4 million in matching funds from the Jewish Hospital Foundation. Ildstad estimates that her team's work could generate more than $10 million in new research funding over the next five years. Joel Kaplan, dean of the School of Medicine and vice president for health affairs, says Ildstad is "one of the highest potential researchers in the country right now."

Hand Transplant
While excercising on a stationary bicycle, Matthew Scott moves several fingers on his transplanted left hand.

U OF L, JEWISH HOSPITAL TEAM ON NATION'S FIRST HAND TRANSPLANT

A team of surgeons from the University of Louisville, Jewish Hospital, and Kleinert, Kutz and Associates Hand Care Center performed the nation's first hand transplant in January. The 14-hour procedure, which involved an 18-member team, will greatly impact the future of transplantation and reconstructive surgery. Doctors say the recipient, 37-year-old New Jersey resident Matthew Scott, is doing well and has even wiggled the fingers of his new hand. A hand transplant, unlike a solid organ transplant, involves multiple tissues (skin, muscle, tendon, bone, cartilage, fat, nerves, and blood vessels) and is called composite tissue allotransplantation. "Hand transplantation is an extremely complex procedure," says Warren C. Breidenbach, a hand surgeon with Kleinert, Kutz and Associates and assistant clinical professor of surgery at U of L, who headed the surgical team. "It could be at least a year before we know if he will have a good functioning hand. We hope for a working hand with a good grip and some sensation of hot and cold." For more information, visit the World Wide Web site at www.handtransplant.com

U OF L SURPASSES FUND RAISING GOAL

Thanks to contributions from employees and students, U of L exceeded its 1998 goal of raising $235,000 for Metro United Way. The university placed 17th among institutional and corporate fund-raising sources in this year's campaign. Metro United Way serves one out of three people in the community each year and supports over 100 local health and human service agencies in seven counties. Above, former executive secretary of the U of L Alumni Association and current student Karen Napolilli enjoys a sunny day with her 15 year-old son, Robby. He suffers from a brain disorder and resides at the Home of the Innocents, a long-term living facility funded by Metro United Way.

SPI OFFERS TOP QUALITY LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING

U of L's Southern Police Institute, an advanced education and training center that provides educational and career development programs for law enforcement practitioners, graduated its 100th Administrative Officers class in November 1998. The course teaches leadership and management for police executives, one of only three such programs in the United States. Approximately 15,000 police officers-from law enforcement agencies throughout the United States, the Pacific Rim nations, and Europe-have completed programs offered by SPI. The institute was created in 1951 in response to the developing civil rights movement and the social conflict that stemmed from it. A division of U of L's Department of Justice Administration, SPI consistently ranks among the top law enforcement educational and training schools in the nation.

U OF L ON-LINE

Unlimited access to the World Wide Web is now available to U of L alumni and supporters from win.net, a Louisville Internet-service provider. A percentage of the monthly fee-$14.95 per month for Louisville-area residents and $17.95 for customers outside of Louisville-benefits the university. Call (502) 589-6800 or (800) 685-6135 to sign up, or visit the site at www.uofl.com. Non-subscribers can also access the site for current news about the university. The site is geared toward serious Card fans "who don't work here or come to school here every day, but still want to be well informed about what's happening in athletics and around campus," says Jim McDonnell of University Licensing.

THE SOUND OF NEW MUSIC

A new show that highlights the work of contemporary composers, In a Different Key, debuted recently on WUOL-90.5 FM. Music composed in the latter half of this century, including the work of John Adams and Igor Stravinsky, as well as popular composers such as Jimi Hendrix, Scott Joplin, and Frank Zappa, has been featured on the show. The one-hour program also highlights the Grawemeyer Award for New Music and its 13-year collection of new works. Airing each Sunday at 7 p.m., the show ties in with the School of Music's "new music" mission and Louisville's historic international connections to new music. The series is produced in conjunction with the U of L School of Music, the Louisville Orchestra, and the Public Radio Partnership, with a grant from the Kentucky Arts Council.

EQUINE PROGRAM HONORS TOP TRAINER

One of thoroughbred racing's most successful trainers, D. Wayne Lukas, was recently recognized by the university for his outstanding contributions to the equine industry. Lukas was honored with the 1998 John W. Galbreath Award, given by U of L's Department of Equine Administration in the College of Business and Public Administration. Lukas' record includes 13 Breeders' Cup wins, three Kentucky Derby wins, and four Preakness Stakes victories. He has been the industry's top money-earning trainer in 14 of the last 15 years. What's the secret to his success? At the awards ceremony, he told students, "You may not be the smartest, you may not have the financial resources to do what you want to do, but don't ever let them outwork you. There's no excuse for being outworked."

STADIUM MARKS L & N HERITAGE

An anonymous supporter donated a refurbished caboose to mark the heritage of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad South Louisville Shops, which once occupied the land where Papa John's Cardinal Stadium now sits. The Cardinal Caboose eventually may be filled with relics, including street signs and photos, of the nearby Highland Park neighborhood, where many L&N employees lived. Other stationary rail cars may be added for fans' use as a hospitality center. A plaque to all L&N employees has been installed temporarily in the Brown & Williamson Club. When a site is prepared, it will be moved to a more accessible location..

LIVING AND LEARNING

A recent University-wide effort to foster a supportive atmosphere for learning is being called a success at U of L. Clustering, which groups students together in residence halls and in courses, is designed to help students get the most from their college experience. Housing is available for students on academic scholarship and in the Honors Program, as well as an international hall and a wellness hall, for students who want to live in an alcohol- and smoke-free environment. In addition, first-year students are housed in Miller and Unitas halls to provide new students with programs and activities to make their transition to U of L successful. A similar effort groups students together in "learning communities" for three or four classes linked by a common theme. Participants say clustering is a success because they have a built-in network of support for academics, social activities, and personal interests.

U OF L IN THE NEWS

The New York Times Education Life November 1, 1998

"Package Deal for College"

"In these boom times, with part-time jobs going begging in the service economy, college students can afford to be picky. That's why United Parcel Service in Louisville, Ky., the company's busiest package-processing hub, began its own version of the G.I. Bill this fall: free tuition at three local colleges-the University of Louisville, Jefferson Community College, and Jefferson Technical College-in exchange for a semester commitment to work 20 hours a week on UPS' most difficult-to-fill shift: midnight to 3 a.m."

NEW SYSTEM READIES LIBRARIES FOR THE NEXT MILLENNIUM

Last year, University Libraries introduced a new client-server, web-based library system to facilitate improved and seamless access to library and other information locally, in Kentucky, and worldwide. The new system supports state-wide efforts to build the Commonwealth Virtual University and the Virtual Library, initiatives that will help libraries around the state and throughout the nation share resources more cost effectively. Features of the new system include Minerva 2000, a web-based version of the on-line catalog with direct links to web resources. Other offerings include more ethernet-connected workstations in public areas, and more full-text databases, such as the OVID health science journals and Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe. University Libraries will also participate in the $80,000 Kentuckiana Project, a state-wide plan to enhance access to Kentucky-oriented archival and manuscript resources housed in the eight publicly-funded university libraries. Go to minerva.louisville.edu