U of L

Departments

Alumni Classnotes

Archives

Feedback

People

Viewpoint

Magazine staff

Advertising

U of L merchandise

president john shumaker
More than 70 photos in the Atlas of Kentucky, like this shot of the Louisville water tower during the 1997 flood, were provided by U of L's Keith Mountain.

U OF L FACULTY CONTRIBUTE TO KENTUCKY ATLAS

Three U of L faculty members from the Department of Geography and Geosciences contributed to the newly-updated Atlas of Kentucky. Chair and Professor Clara Leuthart and Professor David Howarth edited a section on Kentucky's natural environment and Assistant Professor Keith Mountain provided more than 70 of the atlas' photographs, many of them aerial shots. Updated for the first time in more than 20 years, the atlas is the result of more than five years of work from scholars at five of Kentucky's universities. Published in May by the University Press of Kentucky, the atlas brings together a host of information about Kentucky's land, resources, and population in a single reference book. A CD-ROM version of the atlas will be produced in the future.

NEW ARTIFICIAL HEART TO BE TESTED AT U OF L

U of L has been selected as one of five sites to test the world's first totally implantable artificial heart. According to Laman Gray, director of the School of Medicine's Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, the first implant on a human patient could be performed in Louisville in less than two years. In the meantime, researchers will test the device on animals. The battery-powered, implantable heart is designed to fit completely inside the body and the chest cavity; an external magnetic coil transmits power painlessly through the skin to a receiving coil implanted in the body. Developed by researchers at ABIOMED and the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, the device could potentially save the lives of thousands of patients who die each year waiting for a heart transplant.

U OF L TURNS DOWN VILLA

Due to financial considerations, U of L turned down an Italian countess' offer of a 14th-century Italian villa in Tuscany. U of L President John Shumaker announced in June that the cost of renovating and maintaining the site, as well as complying with Italian regulations, would be too expensive for the university. U of L officials had hoped to use the site as a conference center and study abroad hostel. The 99-room villa-worth $15 million-was offered to U of L by Countess Marcella Amiti-Cellisi, the relative of a retired faculty member. The university may lease space in the villa if another university eventually accepts it.

U OF L IN THE NEWS

The Vancouver Sun in British Columbia reported on May 27 that the first transplant of a human hand from a deceased donor to a needy recipient is expected to be performed by a team of Louisville doctors, including U of L faculty, sometime in the next year. The Louisville surgical team presented its research in Vancouver to delegates at the Seventh Congress of the International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand. The new surgery-connecting skin, muscle, bones, tendons, nerves, and blood vessels-has been preceded by successful experiments in rats, pigs, primates, and dogs.

GRAWEMEYER AWARDS HONOR TOP "THINKERS"

U of L recently announced the winners of its 1998 Grawemeyer Awards. The $150,000 prizes recognize ideas and works that, in the words of founder H. Charles Grawemeyer, "help make the world a better place." The winners are:

Charles Marsh, a Loyola College professor of theology who earned the religion award for his work God's Long Summer: Stories in Faith and Civil Rights.

L. Scott Miller, director of the National Task Force on Minority High Achievement, who received the education award for ideas in his book An American Imperative: Accelerating Minority Educational Advancement.

Chinese composer-conductor Tan Dun, whose opera Marco Polo earned the award for music composition.

A fourth award, for ideas improving world order, was not given this year.

U OF L TOPS HARVED ON SUCCESS LIST

"Moving on Up" could be the script describing the College of Business and Public Administration's rapid climb in Success magazine's annual ranking of the nation's top 25 schools for entrepreneurship. "Up and Coming" in 1996, and in the top 25 in 1997, the school made "Top 10" at number seven in the August 1998 issue of the national business journal, ahead of Stanford (14), MIT (20), and Harvard (25). A national panel ranked top schools on quality of curriculum, strength of faculty, support for students, caliber of students, and emphasis on entrepreneurial skills. They lauded U of L's emphasis on "intrapreneurship," the use of entrepreneurial ideas in a corporate setting and gave a "WOW FACTOR" for U of L's international programs. U of L's "Ideas to Action" incubator at the Shelby Campus Telecommunications Center helps get new businesses off the ground, including recent start-ups in Internet site design, software development, telecommunications, and arcade games. Business Dean Robert Taylor noted a key difference in U of L's approach to entrepreneurship, "While other schools teach about entrepreneurship, we're getting a lot of the local community involved with these students. Our students do business plans about businesses that they really want to start."

TOP 10 SCHOOLS FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  1. University of Southern California, Marshall School of Business
  2. DePaul University, Kellstadt Graduate School of Business
  3. University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School
  4. UCLA, The Anderson School
  5. University of Arizona, College of Business and Public Administration
  6. St. Louis University, School of Business
  7. University of Louisville, College of Business and Public Administration
  8. University of Texas at Austin, Texas Business School
  9. Case Western Reserve University, Weatherhead School of Management
  10. University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Business Administration

Success Magazine rankings, August 1998

U OF L ONLINE

Check out U of L Radio features that describe important people and events in the 200-year history of the University of Louisville. Narrated by Theatre Arts Professor David Palmer, the segments bring to life events such as the flood of 1937, the accomplishments of distinguished alumni including Wilson Wyatt and Charles Grawemeyer, and other significant events. The series is sponsored by University Communications and U of L Libraries. Go to http://www.louisville.edu/ur/uofl200/radio.html.

CENTER TO FOCUS ON IMPROVING CHILD CARE

Research shows that high-quality care in early childhood has lifelong advantages, but available care is not always high quality. In an effort to improve quality day-care and preschool programs across Kentucky, U of L has established the Center for Research on Early Childhood Issues and Initiatives. State funds will initially support the center, which will conduct research and recommend ways to ensure that all families have access to high-quality care at affordable rates. Researchers in the fields of education, psychology, psychiatry, and social work are expected to contribute findings to the center.

POLICE IN EMERGING DEMOCRACIES GET ADVICE FROM U OF L

Romanian and Hungarian law-enforcement officers recently learned about police management issues they can use in their emerging democracies from a group of U of L representatives. U of L justice administration faculty Deborah Wilson and Philip Turner joined several law-enforcement experts from around the state for the seminars, which are part of a university effort to expand police management training and technical assistance to central European police agencies. The U.S. Department of State is funding the university's security effort in those countries and Ukraine because crime control issues and anti-corruption efforts are critical in those changing countries. The seminars in Budapest, Hungary, and Bucharest, Romania, attracted about 100 officers from those countries' national police forces.

HIGH SCHOOLERS GET INSPIRED BY ENGINEERING

Twenty-five juniors and seniors from Louisville-area high schools got the chance to try on a career as an engineer this summer. INSPIRE (Increase Student Preparedness and Interest in the Requisites for Engineering), an annual four-week program run by the Speed Scientific School, is designed to help students become more familiar with engineering's career choices. This year's group participated in hands-on projects in several engineering disciplines and took field trips to General Electric Appliance Park, Metropolitan Sewer District, Louisville Gas & Electric, and North American Stainless near Carrollton, Kentucky.

U OF L HELPS UPS DELIVER

This spring, United Parcel Service announced an $860 million expansion of its Louisville hub that will bring 6,000 new jobs to the region. To help fill those jobs with part-time workers and help students around the region gain access to higher education, U of L has joined with UPS and two local schools-Kentucky Tech and Jefferson Community College-to form Metropolitan College. Under the partnership, students will attend night classes, then work the overnight shift at UPS. The company and the state will pay the tuition. Recruiting fairs held in June to attract potential student workers were well-attended, officials say. The first classes begin this fall, with a residence hall and classroom complex to come next year on the Belknap Campus.