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CODRE asks: What did ‘I have a dream’ mean to you

by UofL Today last modified Jul 19, 2013 11:09 AM

You know the speech well. On Aug. 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. stood in front of more than 200,000 people at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. and proclaimed “I have a dream” of a time of racial justice and equality.

CODRE asks: What did ‘I have a dream’ mean to you

UofL will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on Aug. 28.

His words inspired hope and provided a point of national unity in the Civil Rights Movement.

UofL will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom with a campus event Aug. 28. As part of the commemoration, UofL’s Commission on Diversity and Racial Equality (CODRE) is inviting faculty, staff and students to reflect on how the march and its message affected or continues to affect their lives and daily activities.

Until Aug. 7, CODRE will collect video, audio or written comments to several questions directly relating to the Great March on Washington and compile a video from them to be shown during the campus program.

“We would like all faculty, staff and students to participate in remembering this important day in history,” said Trish Blair, one of the event organizers.

Reflections also will be saved in Archives and Special Collections.

People who are interested in participating can email march@louisville.edu to get more information, including questions to help them craft their reflections, and to set up an appointment if they want to have their reflections video or audio taped. Taping should take about 15 minutes.

(Political science professor Dewey Clayton provides his reflection on the Great March in this video.)

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