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KPPC uses stimulus money to be greener; help schools, businesses cut energy costs

by UofL Today last modified Jan 28, 2011 02:52 PM

The Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center is putting its money where its mouth is.

KPPC uses stimulus money to be greener; help schools, businesses cut energy costs

President James Ramsey and KPPC Director Cam Metcalf.

That's what officials with the University of Louisville-based center said Jan. 28 as they showed off newly renovated office space on Shelby Campus at ShelbyHurst that include such energy-reducing features as motion-triggered lights, solar-powered water heater, recycled materials and double-paned windows. The center also reused furniture from another unit at UofL rather than purchasing new.

The open house was part of a press event where UofL President James Ramsey, KPPC Director Cam Metcalf and others also talked about how the center has used federal stimulus money to help schools and businesses save money and become more energy-efficient.

"This is further proof of the University of Louisville's commitment to our community and state," UofL President James Ramsey said. "We're helping schools and businesses across Kentucky save energy and money while benefiting our economy, education system and environment."

Through the U.S. Department of Energy, KPPC received $8.1 million over two years from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

In the first year of funding, KPPC's Kentucky Energy Efficiency Program for Schools (KEEPS) identified $634,973 in potential annual savings for school districts through on-site energy use assessments and found more than $200,000 in possible refunds, reimbursements and credits to be returned to school districts from utility bill analyses.

The center's Environmental Sustainability Program also identified $961,962 in potential annual savings for industrial and commercial clients. The program served 82 clients and conducted 37 on-site assessments.

The money also helped KPPC to create 28 new "green" jobs to support the programs.

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