Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
You are here: Home Campus News Grawemeyer programs to air on public broadcasting

Grawemeyer programs to air on public broadcasting

by UofL Today last modified Dec 10, 2009 04:01 PM

Two programs about the Grawemeyer Awards - one for a statewide television audience and another for a national radio audience - will air this week.

Kentucky Educational Television's "Louisville Life" program will feature an interview with Allan Dittmer, executive director of the Grawemeyer Awards, on its KET2 channel at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The program will be rebroadcast six times through Dec. 14, said producer Jayne McClew.

National Public Radio's "Weekend Edition" will include a segment Saturday or Sunday on Eboo Patel, winner of the 2010 Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion.

Although a specific time for the Patel story remains to be set, Louisville listeners can catch it sometime between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday or Sunday on WFPL-FM, said Lynette Kalsnes of WBEZ in Chicago, who interviewed Patel.

The KET program will be shown again on KET2 at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 11, noon Dec. 13 and 7:30 a.m. Dec. 14. It will air on KET1 at 12:30 a.m. Dec. 10, 7 p.m. Dec. 12 and 10 a.m. Dec. 13.

UofL announced the winners of its five 2010 Grawemeyer Awards Nov. 30-Dec. 4. The annual prizes honor outstanding works in music composition, ideas improving world order, psychology, education and religion. UofL and Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary jointly present the religion award.

Patel, founder and executive director of Interfaith Youth Core in Chicago, won this year's religion prize for his 2007 autobiography, "Acts of Faith: The Story of an American Muslim, the Struggle for the Soul of a Generation."

Other 2010 award winners were:

  • Music composition: York Hoeller of Cologne, Germany, for "Spheres," his six-movement work for orchestra
  • Ideas Improving World Order: Trita Parsi, co-founder of the National Iranian American Council, for his 2007 book, "Treacherous Alliance"
  • Psychology: Ronald Melzack, McGill University, for his theories on pain
  • Education: Keith Stanovich, University of Toronto, for his 2009 book, "What Intelligence Tests Miss"
Document Actions
 
Personal tools