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‘The Other Wes Moore’ to repeat as Book-In-Common

by Brandy Warren, communications and marketing last modified Apr 13, 2012 10:06 AM

Get involved. Make a difference in the lives of young people and in your communities. That was the challenge author Wes Moore issued to University of Louisville students last fall when he came to campus as the keynote speaker for the Book-in-Common (BinC) program.

‘The Other Wes Moore’ to repeat as Book-In-Common

Author Wes Moore during his 2011 Book-in-Common keynote address

Moore’s book, “The Other Wes Moore” was the 2011-12 UofL Book-in-Common – a book selected each year to engage the entire campus community both in the classroom and through co-curricular activities. In order to continue the momentum that’s been built so far, it will be used again in the 2012-2013 academic year.

“The Other Wes Moore” tells about two young men with the same name who grow up in the same hometown and end up on vastly different life paths. Moore, the author, became a Rhodes Scholar, Army combat veteran and White House Fellow. The other Moore is serving a life sentence in prison.

It’s been a popular text among students, said Christy Metzger, director of First Year Initiatives, noting that students seem to be able to relate to the story, which shows how decisions – good and bad – affect a person’s future.

They also have embraced Moore’s challenge. First Year Initiatives has collaborated with campus partners to provided students with opportunities to engage in one-time or ongoing service to several organizations and programs this past academic year.

Among them:

  • About 115 students volunteered at 7 BinC designated sites as part of SOUL - Welcome Week.
  • 23 UofL students are mentoring/tutoring about 30 at-risk high school students through the GO College Louisville Program.
  • Two students and 2 staff members are leading a reading group project with the Bellewood Home for Children. The group developed when some of the home’s youth attended the 2011 Wes Moore talk and became interested in continuing that dialogue.

“We’ve made great strides this year in the service initiative and will be continuing and expanding that effort in 2012-13,” Metzger said. Some possible ways include an Alternative Service Break program that relates to the book’s themes and finding more ways to promote ongoing service activities to students.

UofL faculty who want to use “The Other Wes Moore” in their classrooms are invited to an Ideas to Action workshop noon-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 18 in the Delphi Center lab. The Delphi Center and First Year Initiatives will offer participants resources and assignments they can incorporate in their curricula. Participants will get a free lunch; the first 20 to RSVP will also receive a free copy of the book.

Moore will be back to check in on students’ progress in meeting his challenge in September. He’ll give the BinC keynote address on Sept. 19.

 

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