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Non-M.E. B.Sc. Program Requirements



The Mechanical Engineering Department offers a wide variety of courses supporting its degree and certificate programs. The M.E. courses links below display academic templates for all in the current scheduling rotation. With a few exceptions noted below, all 100-400 level courses are required as part of the B.Sc. programs, 500-level courses are electives open to senior undergraduates or graduate students, and 600- and 700-level courses are electives open to graduate students only.

CEE 205 Statics
CHE 253 Materials Science
CHEM 201 General Chemistry I
CHEM 202 General Chemistry II
CHEM 203 Laboratory in General Chemistry I
EE 252 Introduction to Electrical Engineering
EE 535 Instrumentation Electronics
EG 105 Fundamentals of Engineering Graphics I
EG 214 Introduction to Computer-Aided Graphics and Design
EMCS 101 Engineering Analysis I
EMCS 102 Engineering Analysis II
EMCS 104 Computer Algebra for Engineering
EMCS 205 Matrix Methods for Algebraic and Differential Equations
EMCS 307 Numerical Methods for Engineering
EMCS 360 Probability and Statistics for Engineers
GES 100 Campus Culture for Engineering Students
IE 570 Engineering Design Economics
PHYS 295 Introductory Physics Laboratory I
PHYS 298 Introductory Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
PHYS 299 Introductory Electricity, Magnetism, and Light

CEE 205 Mechanics I Statics (3)

Prerequisites: EAC 101, PHYS 295 and 298. Apply fundamental concepts o:f statics to examine forces, equilibrium, friction, centroids, and moments of inertia, to analyze and solve engineering problems. Both vector and scalar methodologies are used.

CHE 253 Materials Science (3)

The properties of materials as reflected by the atomic and electronic structure of their constituent elements. Mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic, optical and chemical characteristics of metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite solids.

ECE 252 Introduction to Electrical Engineering (3)

Prerequisite: PHYS 299, EAC 201. Corequisite: EAC 201. Note: This course is for Non-ECE students only. Review of electrical quantities, definitions and laws, as applied to DC and AC circuits. Transient and steady-state solutions of linear networks. Impedance concepts and the Phasor Transform for AC Analysis. Complex AC Power. Introduction to Diode Applications and Operational Amplifiers. Electrical safety.

ECE 535 Instrumentation Electronics (3)

Prerequisite: ECE 252; Corequisite: ECE 536. Enrollment restricted to Mechanical Engineering students only. An introduction to analog and digital integrated circuits used in instrumentation systems. Operational amplifiers, digital integrated circuits, analog to digital converters are discussed. Microprocessors are introduced and their uses in data acquisition and control systems are described.

GES 101 Introduction to Engineering (2)

Introduction to the engineering profession and its various disciplines. Includes laboratory exercises on the use of computer software and hands-on problem solving in individual and team exercises.

IE 570 Engineering Design Economics (3)

Prerequisite: Second-year professional school or Graduate/Professional standing. The quantitative aspects of economic decision making necessary for project analysis, plant design, or economic control of a functioning plant. A design project is required.

CHEM 201 General Chemistry I (3)

Prerequisite: An ACT score of 25 or higher in mathematics or completion of MATH 111 or EAC 100; completion of one year of high school Chemistry is also recommended. 3 lecture, 1 recitation. An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of modern chemistry. Special emphasis on chemical periodicity, stoichiometry, equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics, atomic and molecular structure, and descriptive chemistry of the elements.

CHEM 202 General Chemistry II (3)

CHEM 202 General Chemistry II. Prerequisite: ACT score of 25 or greater in mathematics or completion of the requirement for entrance into Mathematics 190 or EMCS 101 (Mathematics 102, or EMCS 100, or Mathematics diagnostic test); completion of one year of high school chemistry is also recommended. An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of modern chemistry. Special emphasis on chemical reactions, stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity and gases.

CHEM 207 Introduction to Chemical Analysis I (1)

Prerequisites: successful com¬pletion of or concurrent registration in CHEM 201. An introduction to the Chemistry laboratory with an emphasis on qualitative analysis.

PHYS 295 Introductory Laboratories I (1)

Prerequisite: Completion/ concurrent registration in PHYS 298. Experiments in mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, and light.

PHYS 298 Introductory Mechanics, Heat, and Sound (4)

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in MATH 205. Note: 3 lecture, one hour conference. Basic methods of physics with calculus applied to topics in mechanics, heat and wave motion.

PHYS 299 Introductory Electricity, Magnetism, and Light (4)

Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent registration in MATH 205. Basic methods of physics with calculus applied to topics in electricity, magnetism and light.

EAC 101 Engineering Analysis I (4)

Introduction to vector methods and development and use of differentiation and integration to solve engineering problems, including those involving motion, related rates, optimization, moments and centers of mass.

EAC 102 Engineering Analysis In (4)

Prerequisite: EAC 101, Corequisite: GES 101. Development and use of: integrating techniques, integrals involving transcendental functions, vectors in three dimensions, polar coordinates, differential equations with variables separable, and power series to solve engineering problems, including those involving work, hydrostatic force, statics, heating and cooling, and catenaries.

EAC 104 Computer Algebra for Engineering (1)

Prerequisite: None. Introduction to the graphical, symbolic, and numerical capabilities of a Computer Algebra System (CAS), with emphasis on performing computations that arise in solving engineering problems.

EAC 201 Engineering Analysis III (4)

Prerequisites: EAC 102, GES 101. Development and use of: partial derivatives, method of separation of variables for partial differential equations, Fourier series, vector-valued functions, multiple integrals, surface integrals, and exact differential equations to solve engineering problems, including those involving thermodynamic relationships, motion in three dimensions, curvature, torsion, fluid flow, curl, flux, divergence, and one dimensional heat flow.

EAC 205 Differential Equations for Engineering (2)

Prerequisites: EAC 201, GES 101. Development and use of: mathematical models, methods for solving first and higher-order ordinary differential equations (DE) and systems of DE, variables separable partial DE, linear difference equations, basic matrix and numerical methods, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and Laplace Transforms, applied to engineering problems, including those involving mixing of fluids, mechanical vibrations, and electrical circuits.

EAC 307 Numerical Methods for Engineering (2)

Prerequisite: EAC 201. Errors and error propagation, solving one and several equations, polynomial interpolation and divided differences, least squares approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, solving ordinary differential equations. Software will be used to perform routine computations.

ttttttttIE 360 Probability and Statistics for Engineers (3)

Prerequisite: EAC 102. Engineering applications using probability, random variables, distribution functions, confidence intervals, estimation and hypothesis testing.

EG 105 Engineering Graphics I (1)

Prerequisite: None. A conceptual approach to the fundamentals of Engineering Graphics, with emphasis in the areas of multiview projection and varied visualization presentations.

EG 214 Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting and Geometric Modeling (1)

An introduction to industry-standard CAD technology for creating and editing 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional geometry is presented. Current standards for 2-D drawing are studied as well as current 3-D modeling concepts.

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