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ME 652 Advanced Human Biodynamics

Catalog Description

ME 652 Advanced Human Biodynamics (3). Prerequisite: ME 651. Development of techniques for synthesis and analysis of kinematic and kinetic models of human motion, in conjunction with acquisition of biomechanical data associated with functional human movement.

Prerequisites by Topic

  1. Planar rigid body dynamics
  2. Matrix algebra
  3. Computer applications

Textbook

P. Allard, Three-Dimensional Analysis of Human Movement, Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.

References

  1. C.L. Vaughan, B.L. Davis and J.C. O’Connor, Dynamics of Human Gait, Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.
  2. D.A. Winter, Biomechanics and Motor Control of Human Movement, Wiley, 1990.

Coordinator

P.M. Quesada, Professor of Mechanical Engineering.

Course Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to give graduate level Mechanical Engineering students an ability to develop and evaluate biomechanical models of human movement, as well as an understanding of the experimental techniques and processes required to acquire appropriate biomechanical, human movement data. Students will use commercial biomechanical and spreadsheet software packages, in addition to developing programs of their own, to compute human kinetic and kinematic parameters from their biomechanical data sets.

Topics Covered

  1. Three-dimensional kinematic data collection and direct linear transformation of video based raw kinematic data (3 classes).
  2. Three-dimensional modeling and computation of rigid body kinematics (5 classes).
  3. Three-dimensional kinetic data collection and processing (3 classes).
  4. Three-dimensional modeling and computation of rigid body kinetics (6 classes).
  5. Electrokinesiology (3 classes).
  6. Biomechanical signal processing (5 classes).
  7. Clinical applications of human movement analysis (2 classes).
  8. Occupational applications of human movement analysis (2 classes).
  9. Sports applications of human movement analysis (2 classes).
  10. Individual student report presentations (2 classes).
  11. Laboratory activities (6 classes).
  12. Examinations (3 classes and 2½ hours).

Laboratory Projects

Team oriented laboratory based experimental project required.

Computer Use

Extensive computer use.

Computer Use

Three 50 minute sessions per week devoted to lecture, discussion, and problem solving.

Curriculum Criterion Contribution

Engineering science: 3 credits.

Curriculum Criterion Contribution

This course supports Mechanical Engineering program objectives by developing:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering in the field of mechanical engineering.
  • An ability to function effectively on teams.
  • An ability to identify, formulate and solve problems in the field of mechanical engineering.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning in the field of mechanical engineering.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern tools necessary for the practice of mechanical engineering.

Prepared by P.M. Quesada, June 2009

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