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ME 512 Finite Element Methods for Mechanical Design I

Catalog Description

ME 512 Finite Element Methods for Mechanical Design I (3). Prerequisite: ME 432. Matrix analysis of static and dynamic structural systems and steady-state heat transfer. Computer aided design of trusses, frames, plane stress structures, and 1-D and 2-D thermal systems including conduction and convection.

Prerequisites by Topic

  1. Matrix algebra
  2. Computer programming
  3. Mechanics of materials
  4. Heat transfer

Textbook

R.D. Cook, D.S. Malkus, M.E. Plesha and R.J. Witt, Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis, 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2002.

Coordinator

R.D. Bradshaw, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering.

Course Learning Outcomes

To introduce the finite element method and its application to engineering design problems in the fields of structural mechanics, dynamics and thermal analysis.

Topics Covered

  1. Basic finite element concepts (2 classes)
  2. Direct stiffness and variational approaches (4 classes)
  3. Bar / beam finite element analysis and design (4 classes)
  4. Plane stress / strain analysis and design (6 classes)
  5. Isoparametric elements and formulation (4 classes)
  6. Modeling techniques, errors and accuracy (3 classes)
  7. 3-D solids and solids of revolution, stress analysis and design (6 classes)
  8. Plates and shells analysis and design (4 classes)
  9. Thermal analysis and design (4 classes)
  10. Vibration and dynamics analysis and design (3 classes)
  11. Examinations (2 classes and 2½ hour final exam)

Computer Use

Use of ANSYS finite element analysis software.

Laboratory Projects

Various in-class and homework projects are assigned in the areas of structural mechanics, dynamics and thermal analysis.

Class/Laboratory Schedule

Three 50 minute sessions per week devoted to lecture, discussion, problem solving, and design activities.

Graduate Requirements

Graduate students are required to complete an assignment consisting of a solution to one or more problems using finite element analysis that the instructor considers to be at an advanced level of difficulty.

Curriculum Criterion Contribution

Engineering science: 1 credit, engineering design: 2 credits.

Relationship to Program Outcomes

This course supports Mechanical Engineering Department B.Sc. program objectives by developing:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering in the field of mechanical engineering.
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs in the field of mechanical engineering.
  • An ability to identify, formulate and solve problems in the field of mechanical engineering.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning in the field of mechanical engineering.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern tools necessary for the practice of mechanical engineering.

Prepared by R.D. Bradshaw, June 2009

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