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Academic Policies

Click here to view the complete list of University Policies from the current undergraduate catalog.

Academic Advising | Academic Bankruptcy Forgiveness | Academic Grievance Procedure | Academic Integrity | Academic Standing
Catalog Year | Classification of Students | Class Attendance | College Readiness Standards |
Course Audit | Course Load | Course Pass/Fail | Course Repetition Policy | Dropping, Adding, and Withdrawing Courses |
Dean's List and Dean's Scholar | Final Examinations | Grading and Course Numbering System |
Graduation and Degree Requirements | Graduation with Academic Honors | Incomplete Course Work |
Internships, Cooperatives, and Independent Study | Codes of Student Conduct, Rights, and Responsibilities |
Awarding of Credit through Placement Exams | Registration Policy | Residency Status

 

Academic Advising

University Policy
University Philosophy of Academic Advising for Undergraduates

Academic advising at the University of Louisville is an on-going, intentional, educational partnership dedicated to student academic success. The University is committed to an academic advising system that guides students to discover and pursue life goals, supports diverse and equitable educational experiences, advances students’ intellectual and cultural development, and teaches students to become engaged, self-directed learners and competent decision makers.

The University and its undergraduate academic units and advisors believe that student success is a comprehensive, campus-wide, process/effort/responsibility to express these values:

  • Teaching and learning as an academic advising function.
  • Fostering a community of respect.
  • Encouraging the individuality/diversity of students and their unique educational/needs/experiences.
  • Working collaboratively with others through shared challenges, achievements, ideas, and resources continuously to incorporate best practices into university-wide advising.
  • Identifying a common goal of student engagement in learning and success.
  • Using technological innovations that seek to improve the student experience/ academic advising experience.
  • Promoting diversity as central to intellectual and cultural development.
  • Developing student satisfaction with academic advising.


Speed School of Engineering Policy

The Academic Advising Center in J.B. Speed Building, Room 123 is the academic resource center for students in Engineering Fundamentals. The advising staff is a team of professional academic counselors who provide assistance in planning programs of study, coordinate registration of courses, and provide guidance and referral services.  Students who have been admitted to Departmental Studies are expected to obtain advising from the faculty advisors in the department of their major. While your academic advisor will make every effort to guide you throughout your education, students are ultimately responsible for developing a familiarity of and adherence to University, college, and departmental policies and procedures.

Engineering Fundamentals

All students in Engineering Fundamentals (students not yet admitted to their major department) are required to meet with an academic advisor in the Academic Advising Center prior to registration.  The academic advisor will set an advising code to clear the student for registration.  Advising appointments for registration should be made in J.B. Speed Building, Room 213123; no appointments will be made over the phone. Advising office hours are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  For further information about academic advising in the School of Engineering, call 502-852-6100 or email Speed School Advising.

Departmental Studies

After admission to Departmental Studies, the student is assigned a departmental advisor for the academic program of study. Students should contact their Department to determine the appropriate advisor and the advisor’s office hours.  Appointments can typically be made at the departmental office between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.

The Departments of Bioengineering Department, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Computer Engineering and Computer Science, and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department require all of their students to be advised.  In these departments, it will be necessary for an academic advisor to set an advising code to clear the student registration.

Newly admitted students to the Departments of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Mechanical Engineering departments are required to meet with an advisor for the semester they are admitted to the department.  Students must continue to meet with an advisor if they have earned fewer than 60 credit hours.  Students in these departments with more than 60 credit hours are not required to meet with an advisor in subsequent terms, but are strongly encouraged to do so.  Students All students on academic warning or probation are required to see their advisor.

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Academic Bankruptcy and Forgiveness

University Policy
Academic bankruptcy allows students who are returning to college after remaining out for an extended period to void one or more entire semesters of previous college work.  Students considering this option are strongly encouraged to consult with their academic advisor for guidance.

If the student meets the following criteria and if the appropriate committee (located within the student’s enrollment unit) finds there are extenuating circumstances that warrant such action, the committee may rule the student eligible to declare academic bankruptcy.  To be eligible, the student:

  • must not have attended any college or university during a period of two calendar years immediately preceding this readmission; and
  • must state in writing the intention to declare bankruptcy, specifically designating the term or consecutive sequence of terms to which the bankruptcy process is to apply.


The student must attain at least a 2.5 quality point standing (3.0 quality point standing or higher in the College of Business and 2.8 Dental Hygiene and Nursing programs) in all degree applicable courses while attempting the first 12 hours after readmission. (All courses taken during the term in which the twelfth-hour minimum is attained will be considered in determining eligibility for bankruptcy.) After these 12 hours have been attempted, the student must petition the appropriate committee for academic bankruptcy, designating the term or consecutive sequence of terms to which the bankruptcy process is to apply.

The voided grades and credit hours will not be considered for degree requirements or quality-point computations, but will remain on the student’s transcript. Academic actions, such as probation or dismissal, recorded at the end of the voided terms, will also remain.

No student may declare bankruptcy more than once.  Bankrupt semesters will not apply toward enrollment semesters when determining catalog year.  No course taken during a bankrupted semester can be used to satisfy a requirement.

Students are advised that while bankrupted course grades are removed from the calculation, the course work does remain a part of their permanent record and that the bankrupted work may be considered for financial aid purposes, NCAA purposes, and may be evaluated if applying for honors or graduate study.   No person using these bankruptcy procedures shall be eligible to participate in any intercollegiate competition until the specified grades and courses have been declared void.

Additionally, students must be aware that academic bankruptcy is an internal policy.  The University of Louisville cannot guarantee how the work will be viewed by another university should the student choose to transfer.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
The J.B. Speed School of Engineering follows the general university policy.

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Academic Grievance Procedure

University Policy
Section 1: Introduction
This procedure is designed to provide fair means of dealing with student complaints regarding a specific action or decision made by the faculty or a faculty member. “Students who believe they have been treated unfairly, discriminated against, or have had their rights abridged may initiate a grievance” (The Redbook, Section 6.8.1).

The Unit Academic Grievance Committee has the power to hear all grievances involving academic matters other than substantive grade appeals. “Academic matters are defined as those concerning instructional activities, research activities, activities closely related to either of these functions, or decisions involving instruction or affecting academic freedom” (The Redbook, Section 6.8.3). The Unit Academic Grievance Committee may review allegations that a course grade has resulted from an unfair procedure. However, the committee should not substitute its judgment on their merits as an evaluation of academic performance. Where the dean concurs that procedural irregularities have occurred, the dean shall consult with an appropriate faculty committee as to the grade to be recorded on the student’s official transcript. To assist the student, a Student Grievance Officer is provided, who is responsible for “informing students of their rights and obligations under the grievance procedure and especially the deadlines that have been established. The Student Grievance Officer shall seek to resolve informally as many grievances as possible” (The Redbook, Section 6.8.2).

Students are encouraged to seek the assistance of the Student Grievance Officer at any stage of the grievance process. Each unit shall establish an Academic Grievance Committee to carry out the procedures described below.

Section 2: Preliminary Steps
To pursue a grievance concerning academic matters within the academic unit, the following steps of the grievance procedure should be observed:

  1. The student should first discuss the matter with the person involved and attempt to resolve the grievance through informal discussion.
  2. If there is no resolution, the student should discuss the matter with that person’s supervisor or the person to whom such person reports, who should attempt to mediate a resolution.
  3. If the student has not been able to obtain a resolution, he or she may request the Student Grievance Officer (S.G.O.) to attempt informal mediation of the problem.
  4. If the matter has not been satisfactorily resolved through the informal process, the student shall submit a written statement of the grievance to the Unit Academic Grievance Committee through the Office of the Dean. The statement shall contain:

a. A brief narrative of the condition giving rise to the grievance;
b. designation of the parties involved; and
c. statement of the remedy requested.

Section 3: Committee Action
Upon receipt of the written statement, the Unit Academic Grievance Committee, or its representatives, shall:

  1. Contact the student and the Student Grievance Officer to obtain assurance that all steps of the above informal process were completed and that those  issues in the statement were discussed at all levels.
  2. Notify the parties named in the statement of the grievance naming them; and send a copy of the statement to the named parties and to all committee members.
  3. Notify the grievant and the respondent of the right to challenge committee members for cause, and request early notification of challengers to expedite the grievance procedure. Included in this notification will be a list of the names of all current, regular committee members.
  4. Meet within twenty working days after receiving the written statement of any grievance and recommend to the dean of the unit whether sufficient grounds exist to accept a case for hearing. The committee shall hear the case when the dean concurs. The committee shall notify, in writing, all persons directly involved as to the reasons for its recommendation.
  5. The action of the grievance committee as to whether to grant a hearing when accepted by the dean of the unit shall be final and binding on all parties except when subject to the condition of appeal.
  6. If a hearing will be held, notify in writing all the parties involved, including any witnesses, of the date, time and place of the hearing at least ten days prior to the hearing date (which shall be within 30 working days of receipt of the written grievance).
  7. Request in writing from all parties involved any pertinent material deemed necessary for review by the committee prior to the hearing. These materials, and any additional materials either party chooses to submit, must be submitted to the committee not later than four days prior to the hearing. Any person named in a grievance may submit a written statement to the committee outlining issues from that person’s perspective.
  8. Maintain confidentiality throughout the entire grievance process. All communications among the committee, the grievant(s), and the person(s) named in the statement of grievance will be confidential.

 
Section 4: Hearing Process
All hearings conducted by the Unit Academic Grievance Committee shall be conducted confidentially in the following manner:

  1. The grievant(s) and the respondent(s) must be present during the information gathering portion of the hearing. Witnesses will be available and will be called when needed. The committee reserves the right to allow the presence of a secretary or a technical assistant.
  2. All statements during the information-exchange phase of the hearing will be recorded. This record will be preserved in the University Archives for a minimum of five years and shall be confidential.
  3. Any committee member may question any of the participants at the hearing.
  4. The grievant will present his or her statements and/or witnesses to the committee.
  5. The respondent will have the opportunity to question the grievant(s) and the witnesses about their statements.
  6. The respondent will present his or her statements and/or witnesses to the committee.
  7. The grievant will have the opportunity to question the respondent(s) about their statements.
  8. After all information is exchanged, all persons except the committee members and the recording secretary will leave the committee room. The grievant(s), the respondent(s), and the witnesses will continue to be available to the committee should further information be needed.
  9. The committee will meet in closed session to decide upon its recommendation(s) to the dean.
  10. The committee shall submit its report with recommendation(s) and reasons for the recommendation(s), to the grievant(s), the respondent(s), and the dean. If the grievance directly involves the dean the report and recommendation(s) of the Unit Academic Grievance Committee shall be referred for decision to the University Provost.
  11. The student’s grievance will not be included as part of the student’s record, unless it results in a change in student status or the student voluntarily inserts the information.
  12. Until the grievance is resolved, the student may continue the natural academic progression through the academic unit subject to the requirements of Article 6.6, “Academic Review. Advancement, Probation, and’ Dismissal of Students,” and Article 6.7, “Nonacademic Disciplinary Procedures,” of The Redbook.


Section 5: Decision
The dean shall approve or reject the committee’s recommendation(s) within 28 days after receiving it (them). If decision of the dean is not in accord with the committee’s recommendation(s), the dean shall state the reasons for that decision, in writing, to all persons directly involved in the grievance and to the committee. The dean shall then take appropriate action to implement his or her decision after the time for appeal has elapsed.
 
Section 6: Rehearing
A grievance committee, within 21 days after delivery of its report, may be petitioned to reconsider its decision upon the basis of evidence of misrepresentation of materials, facts, or upon the basis of newly discovered evidence clearly not available at the original hearing.

Section 7: Appeal
Any party to the grievance may appeal to the University Student Grievance Committee within 21 days from the date of the final decision of the dean if the dean’s decision does not concur with the recommendation of the grievance committee.

Student Grievance Officer
The Student Grievance Officer is a tenured faculty member who is responsible for informing students of their rights and obligations under the University Student Grievance procedure. The Grievance Officer will assist the student in efforts to achieve informal resolution in as many academic or non-academic complaints as possible.

This service is available to all students.  E-mail Professor Brenda Hart.

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Academic Integrity

The faculty member may choose to resolve a problem of academic dishonesty informally with the student.  The procedures outlined below should apply when informal procedures are inappropriate, insufficient, or unacceptable to either party.

As evidence of the seriousness with which J.B. Speed School of Engineering regards these matters, an Academic Integrity Review Committee should be established to assist in dealing with violators.  This Committee would serve to protect the student's right to a fair and impartial hearing.  To ensure its effectiveness, the faculty should view it as the primary channel through which serious problems can be resolved.

  • The Academic Integrity Review Committee shall be a standing committee of the J.B. Speed School of Engineering.
  • The Committee shall be comprised of three students selected by the Speed School Student Council; three faculty members, representing three different departments of the J.B. Speed School of Engineering and nominated by the Committee on Committees and elected by the faculty; and the Dean of the J.B. Speed School of Engineering, or his or her representative.  The Committee shall select its own chairperson.

 

1. A faculty member who uncovers a problem of cheating or plagiarism should:

  • Confront the student or students involved in a timely fashion.  If the faculty member makes a good faith effort to locate the student, and is unable to do so, he or she may proceed to (second bullet point) below.
  • Within five school days of the original confrontation (or good faith attempt to confront), prepare a written statement that specifies the charges.
  • Send a copy of the written statement to the Chairperson of the Review Committee and to the Dean.

 

2. The student shall either admit or deny the charge of academic dishonesty by submitting a written statement, within five school days of the original confrontation, to the Chairperson of the Academic Integrity Review Committee, as well as the Dean.  If the student does not meet this deadline, the actions outlined in item #3 will be followed.

3. If the student admits the charge, the following actions should occur:

  • The faculty member may impose appropriate academic penalty.
  • A faculty member who wishes to pursue administrative penalties shall forward a statement of the charges, proposed administrative penalties, the student's admission of guilt, and a statement of the academic penalties imposed (if any) to the Dean and to the Chairperson of the Academic Integrity Review Committee.
  • The Dean shall review the documents and issue a decision, within 15 school days, regarding whether any administrative sanctions shall be imposed on the student by the J.B. Speed School of Engineering, and whether any University-wide sanctions will be recommended to the Provost.  The Dean shall notify the student, the faculty member and the Department Chair of this decision.  The Dean shall forward any recommended University-wide sanctions to the Provost, with a copy to the Academic Integrity Review Committee.

 

4. Should the student deny the charge, the following actions should occur:

  • The written statements made by both parties will be made available to both parties and to the Academic Integrity Review Committee prior to any oral testimony.  Any refutations may be made in writing or orally at the hearing.
  • Upon receipt of written statements from both parties, the Academic Integrity Review Committee Chairperson will be responsible for notifying all involved parties in the following manner:
    • The Academic Integrity Review Committee will be convened within 20 school days of receipt of written statements from the parties involved.
    • Notice of convening of the Review Committee shall be either hand delivered to the student or sent by Registered U.S. Postal Service to the address listed with the Registrar's Office and to the faculty member as well as the Dean via interoffice mail.  The Review Committee Chairperson shall be responsible for delivery of such notices at least 10 school days prior to the hearing date.  The notice shall state the time, date and place of the hearing and contain a copy of the original statements of the allegations.
  • The Academic Integrity Review Committee shall hear such cases as come before it in a timely fashion (as previously stated, 20 school days maximum) and allow the student to speak on his or her behalf and to present evidence and witnesses.  Further, the burden of proof rests with the person making the charge.  Only in the event of a guilty verdict, may the student's record be consulted by the Committee to determine any past offenses and assist in determining an appropriate penalty.

 

5. The Academic Integrity Review Committee is given the responsibility of recommending the penalties for the violator, and such penalties shall be commensurate with both the nature and the seriousness of the case in question.  Proposed penalties shall be described as either:

  • Academic penalties.  These are penalties associated with the class in question, such as resubmission of alternate assignment, F on the assignment, F for the course, etc.
  • Administrative penalties.  These are penalties to be imposed by the Dean or Provost.  Penalties may include suspension or expulsion from the J.B. Speed School of Engineering or the University of Louisville.

 

Typically, for the first offense of cheating or plagiarism, failure in the course will be recommended; of course, the instructor retains his or her right to assign the grade.  However, the instructor may not reserve the right to impose a harsher penalty than decided upon by theCommittee.  Any subsequent offense may result in suspension or dismissal from the J.B. Speed School of Engineering, with the Dean's concurrence.  All such actions taken by the Committee shall be entered in the student's file.

The Committee may adopt additional principles or procedures as seem appropriate.  Such changes, however, should be presented to the faculty for approval.

If properly notified students fail to appear before the Committee, the hearing will be held in the student's absence and final decision rendered.

If a properly notified faculty member fails to appear, the charges will be dropped.

  • Any student who believes the processing or final disposition of a charge of academic dishonesty was unfair may initiate a grievance under the Academic Grievance Procedure.

 

The J.B. Speed School of Engineering follows the procedures for academic grievance as published in "The Redbook," Chapter Six, Article Eight.  Any student considering filing such a grievance should consult with personnel in the Academic Services Office for advice and information.

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Academic Standing

University Policy
Policies regarding academic standing are determined by each academic unit.  Please refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Students have the responsibility to know their current status. The School routinely notifies students when their status changes, but such notification may not be possible before the beginning of the semester. Notification of academic actions are oficially made through the student's university email account.
Decisions involving academic warning, probation, suspension, dismissal, honors and eligibility for graduation are defined by each academic unit.  These decisions are based on the university grade point average (GPA), which is determined by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted. The number of hours attempted is computed by adding the hours for all courses in which the student has earned grades.  The overall point standing takes into account all work taken at the University, excluding courses numbered below the 100 level.  Grades and quality points earned at other institutions are not incorporated into the university grade point average.

Students have the responsibility to know their current status. The School routinely notifies students when their status changes, but such notification may not be possible before the beginning of the semester. Notification of academic actions is officially made through the student's university email account.

Good Standing
Undergraduate students are in good standing and are making satisfactory progress when they have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.

Academic Warning
Undergraduate students who, after the first 12 degree-applicable semester hours at the university, have a GPA below 2.0 will be placed on Academic Warning. They will be notified that their achievement is below expectations and strongly encouraged to seek assistance. Students on Academic Warning are limited to enrollment for 13 credit hours (7 credit hours during the Speed School summer term). A student placed on Academic Warning will have the following semester to raise the cumulative GPA to at least 2.0. If that does not occur, the student will then be placed on Academic Probation.

Academic Probation
In any semester subsequent to that described in Academic Warning above, an undergraduate student who has less than a 2.0 GPA will be placed on Academic Probation for the next semester in which the student enrolls.  Students on Academic Probation are notified that their achievement is below expectations and are subject to course and/or credit hour limitations. During a semester on Academic Probation, no student may enroll in more than 13 credit hours (7 credit hours during the Speed School summer term).   Students on Academic Probation will have their records evaluated at the end of the probationary semester with one of the following outcomes:

  • Student whose cumulative and semester GPA are both at or above 2.0 will be restored to good standing in the Speed School.
  • Student whose cumulative GPA is still below 2.0 but who earned a semester GPA of at least 2.5 will be maintained on probation.
  • Student whose cumulative GPA is still below 2.0, and who earned a semester GPA at or above 2.0 but below 2.5, may petition for continuation on probation. The petition describing the student’s plan of action to return to good standing must be submitted to the school’s Standards and Admissions Committee.  Students who do not submit a petition will be placed on Academic Suspension.
  • Student whose cumulative and semester GPA are both below 2.0 will be placed on Academic Suspension and will be required to sit out at least one semester.


Academic probation will be considered a serious warning that the student is making unsatisfactory progress toward completion of the academic requirements for a particular degree program. Students on academic probation are ineligible to hold office in any campus organization or to represent the school or the University in any official capacity, except by special approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Students who are on academic probation are not eligible for co-op assignments.

Limited Load
Although a student may be admitted to Departmental Studies and continue to maintain minimal academic standards, it is possible for individual performance levels to fall beneath the projected progress necessary for future admission to Graduate Studies.  A student enrolled in Departmental Studies who at the end of the semester or term has a cumulative GPA below 2.25 will be placed on Limited Load. While on Limited Load, no student may enroll in more than 13 credit hours (7 credit hours during the Speed School of Engineering summer term). A student will be continued on limited load until the cumulative GPA is raised to 2.25

Academic Suspension
Students suspended for unsatisfactory academic performance will not be permitted to enroll for academic course work for at least one semester. During this period, individuals should seriously reexamine their previous accomplishments in terms of their chosen career objectives.  After one semester, a student who believes that a reasonable opportunity for future successful performance exists may petition the school’s Standards and Admissions Committee for re-admittance to the Speed School of Engineering.  Readmission of suspended students is not guaranteed.  The petitioner must submit an Application of Undergraduate Admission form to the University’s Office of Admissions in addition to the written petition.  The petition for readmission of a student suspended for unsatisfactory academic performance must be received by the enrollment unit at least one month prior to the first day of classes for the semester in which the student seeks readmission. The petition should address the student’s perception of the causes of poor performance; the steps the student has taken to address those causes; and a plan of action to return to good standing.  Students who are granted reinstatement will be readmitted on academic probation.

Academic Dismissal
No student will be reinstated more than twice; the third suspension is an academic dismissal.  A student academically dismissed can only return through special permission from the enrollment unit.  Students who are suspended or dismissed from the Speed School of Engineering are eligible to apply for admission to another U of L unit and may be admitted if they meet minimum admission standards of that unit.  Students who apply for admission to another unit may not enroll in any courses in the unit from which they were dismissed.

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Catalog Year

University Policy
The catalog years for this catalog are Summer 2011 through Spring 2012. The requirements, rules and policies therein are generally applicable to students who enroll at the University beginning with the Summer 2011 semester through the Spring 2012 term. The University reserves the right to change programs of study, academic policies, academic requirements, fees, schedules of courses, or the announced academic calendar without prior notice. Students with continuous enrollment who transfer within the University will be expected to meet the general education requirements in effect the year they were admitted to the University. Students are responsible for knowing the catalog year policy for general education and the degree programs of the academic unit in which they intend to earn a degree.

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Classification of Students

University Policy
Undergraduate students are admitted to an undergraduate enrollment unit and classified as follows:

  • Full-time students: those who are registered for 12 or more semester hours in a regular school session.
  • Part-time students: those who are registered for fewer than 12 semester hours in a regular school session.
  • Regular students: those who have satisfied the admissions requirements for the academic unit in which they are enrolled.
  • Special students: those who do not satisfy the admissions requirements for the academic unit in which they are enrolled, but who are admitted by special consent.
  • Visiting students: those regularly enrolled in other institutions who desire to register in one of the academic units of the University for one semester. Visiting students must be in good standing in their regular college or university.
  • Freshmen: students who have fewer than 30 semester hours credit.
  • Sophomores: students who have 30 or more, but fewer than 60 semester hours of credit.
  • Juniors: students who have 60 or more, but fewer than 90 semester hours credit.
  • Seniors: students who have 90 or more semester hours credit but have not received baccalaureate degrees.
  • Post-baccalaureate: students holding baccalaureate degrees and taking further undergraduate work.
  • Auditors: students enrolled in a class or classes on a noncredit basis.


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Class Attendance

University Policy
Policy regarding class attendance are established by each academic unit and are discussed below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
The programs of the Speed School are uniformly rigorous and demanding.  Class attendance is expected and, if so indicated in the course syllabus, may be used to partially determine the course grade. Moreover, class participation may be a factor in grading as well as taking examinations, completing homework assignments, and fulfilling other course requirements.

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College Readiness Standards

University Policy
Foreign Language Placement
The study of a foreign language is encouraged and required by some university majors. Students may choose to begin with the first semester in a new language or may choose to determine placement in language studies.

To determine placement, students may complete an online placement test in Spanish, French, German or Russian available at all times. Language exams can be taken on any computer with an Internet connection. The Office of Testing Services administers the placement tests for Latin.  First-time, first-year students must take a language exam before May 15 each academic year to register for a language course section during Freshman Summer Orientation. [To receive course credit for foreign language, see the catalog section, "Awarding of Credit thru Placement Tests."]

If a student has significant experience in a language other than Spanish, French, German, Russian or Latin, the student should contact the Department of Classical and Modern Languages for information on placement or exemption at 502.852.6686.

Kentucky Administrative Regulation 13 KAR 2:02
The Commonwealth of Kentucky has approved legislation for college readiness standards in writing, college reading and mathematics. Admitted, degree-seeking students below 24 credit hours who do not achieve the college readiness standards on the ACT sub scores in writing, college reading and mathematics (SAT equivalents) or on the COMPASS placement exams (reading and mathematics) are required by state-mandate to complete interventions during their first college year.  These interventions may include an appointment at the University Writing Center, the "Special Topics in Supplemented College Reading" course linked to entry-level content courses, Supplemented MATH 111, or prerequisite JCTC developmental courses in Mathematics.

College Writing Placement
The college readiness standard in writing is less than 18 on the ACT writing sub score.  Students below college readiness will register for ENG 101 during their first college year.  Students experiencing difficulty during the first weeks of class will be required to attend an appointment with the University Writing Center for supplemented support.

College Reading Placement
The state-wide, college readiness standard in college reading is a 20 ACT Reading sub score. In compliance with state law, the university requires that all university first-year, degree-seeking students with less than 24 credit hours who are admitted with reading deficiencies participate in placement testing and course registration as determined by their placement test results.

Students with an ACT Reading sub score of less than 20 (or an SAT Critical Reading score of less than 470) MUST take the Reading COMPASS exam.  The exam serves as a second predictor of college reading readiness.  Students whose scores on the Reading COMPASS exam are less than 84 will be required to register for GEN 105, “Special Topics in Supplemented College Reading.” Advisors working with students are obliged to assist them in developing an individual schedule of classes that meets this state mandate and university requirement.  

  • GEN 105 provides an intervention for college reading. Students who enroll in this course will receive 2 hours each week of supplemented instruction in college reading, critical thinking, and study strategies. Students receive 1 hour of college credit (elective credit only) for GEN 105. Students will receive 3 hours of college credit for successful completion of the general education course section linked to GEN 105.
  • Students enrolled in GEN 105 will attend the general education lecture course for 3 hours each week and will attend GEN 105 for 2 hours each week.  Students will attend a total number of 5 hours of class each week for these linked courses.


The Reading COMPASS exam is available to take by appointment only at the UofL Testing Services at any time before course registration.  It is highly recommended that local students contact Testing Services and schedule an appointment for this exam. The Reading COMPASS exam may also be available at a testing center close to your place of residence that would be willing to transfer your COMPASS score to UofL Testing Services.  For more information on this option, please contact UofL’s Testing Services.  

If you are unable to be on campus to take the Reading COMPASS exam before Summer Orientation, you will have time during Orientation to complete the exam before class registration.  Your Orientation confirmation will include your college reading information and the assigned time to take the exam.

Mathematics Placement:
The college readiness standard in mathematics is less than 19 on the ACT mathematics sub score. The university determines placement in all entry-level mathematics based on the highest ACT mathematics sub-score. If a student scores above 19 on the ACT mathematics sub score, placement will be in a credit-bearing course.

The following sub scores in mathematics determine placement:

  • Students with an ACT sub-score of 0 - 18 are required to complete the COMPASS exam in mathematics.  Placement will result in MT 055, 065, 080 or an entry-level college mathematics course. Students with an ACT sub-score of 19 - 24, but less than the score required for a desired entry-level mathematics course should complete the UofL Math Challenge Placement Exam (excluding engineering majors).
  • Engineering Students with an ACT sub-score at least 24 do not take the UofL Math Placement Exam.
  • Students with an ACT sub-score of 25-26 who need MATH 205 have the following options: complete the  COMPASS exam, complete the Calculus Readiness Test, enroll in the prerequisite MATH 190 or complete the CLEP Precalculus exam.
  • Students with an ACT sub-score of 21 - 22 who need MATH 111 are strongly encouraged to enroll in a Supplemented Section of MATH 111.
  • Students with an ACT sub-score of 19 will be initially placed in MT 080, Intermediate Algebra, but may take the UofL Math Placement exam for possible higher placement.


Students seeking a BA in the Social Sciences, Humanities, Arts, or Music and who have a 19-20 sub score are encouraged to enroll in a Supplemented Section of MATH 105, Intro to Contemporary Math, to satisfy the General Education Mathematics Requirement.

Placement and University Testing Services

All information regarding foreign language placement testing and college readiness placement testing can be obtained from the Office of Testing Services in Davidson Hall, 502.852.6606.

Students are encouraged to direct questions and concerns to this office.   Local students are encouraged to contact the Office of Testing Services to schedule an appointment to take any or all placement exams.

First-year students are provided opportunities during Freshman Summer Orientation each year to complete placement tests before registering for classes.  The Admissions Office notifies first-year students if placement testing is required in college reading and mathematics. Students receive an Orientation confirmation which includes testing information and assigned times.

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Course Audit

University Policy
The following consolidated University policy is applicable to all academic units.

Audited courses do not earn credit. The transcript will indicate that the course was taken as an audit.  Audit status is offered only on a space available basis.  For that reason, students may not register for a class in an audit status during early registration, nor may a student change from graded to audit status during that period.  Students may register for classes in audit status during regular registration and then only with the written approval of the instructor of the course.  Specific work expectations that will warrant the audit designation on the transcript should be confirmed with the instructor facilitating the course.  Auditors who do not fulfill the work expectations may be withdrawn from the course with a grade of “W” noted on the transcript.

Students who have registered as auditor will not receive credit for the course unless their registration has been changed officially from audit to credit by the published deadline for such a change.  Students are allowed to change from audit to grade status or from grade status to audit status at any time from the beginning of regular registration through the last day to add a class with approval from the course instructor.  Students are advised that such approval is the instructor’s prerogative, subject to completion of course prerequisites, and that audit status may have implications for financial aid eligibility.  Any change of status must be submitted on the form provided in the schedule of courses and turned in to the Registrar’s Office by the deadline.  Students admitted to their school or college as “auditors” are not eligible to take courses for credit and may not change their class registration from audit to credit.

Students are cautioned that auditing a class cannot substitute for taking the course for credit if that course is part of the credit hour requirement for graduation, including both college-wide and major requirements. Any required course taken as audit must be retaken for credit in order to be counted toward a degree. Students are advised to consult with their academic advisor to determine if registration as auditors will satisfy the intended purposes. Students may enroll for credit in any course which was taken for audit, in a semester subsequent to the semester when the course was audited, provided those students have been admitted to the College on a basis that confers eligibility to take courses for credit. If a student takes a course for both audit and credit, the transcript will show both entries.

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Course Load

University Policy
Each unit has established its own policy regarding normal and maximum course loads.  Refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Registration for 12 or more credit hours during a semester entitles an undergraduate student to full-time status. Students may take a maximum of 18 credit hours each fall and spring semester and 13 credit hours in the summer term. In special circumstances during fall and spring semesters, students may register for 19 credit hours with permission from the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Students on either limited load, academic warning, or academic probation status are limited to no more than 13 credit hours during fall and spring semesters and 7 credit hours during the summer term.

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Course Pass/Fail

University Policy
Each unit has established its own policy regarding registration for courses on a pass/fail basis.  Refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Students who have been admitted to Departmental Studies may take one course each semester on a pass-fail basis to the limit of three courses or nine semester hours in total (not including credit obtained for cooperative assignments). However, students on academic probation or limited load are not eligible to take courses on a pass-fail basis during the term of their probation. Courses used in fulfillment of general education requirements, courses specified by number and/or title in the student’s curriculum and major-program electives may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.  A passing grade will have no bearing on the student’s term average or cumulative average; a failing grade will be averaged in both the term and cumulative average on the same basis as any other grade of “F”.

Students may not change their registration, either from credit to pass/fail, or from pass-fail to credit after the first half of the semester. Credit earned for a co-op assignment is always on a pass-fail basis. All students are permitted to register for physical education courses on a pass-fail basis.

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Course Repetition Policy

University Policy

 

Each unit has established its own policy regarding repetition of courses.  Refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Undergraduate students may repeat to replace a maximum of four (4) courses with grades of C or below.  Students in Graduate Studies may repeat to replace one course with a grade of C or below. For these repeated courses, only the last grade attained will be used in the grade-point average calculation. Courses in which a grade of C or D was originally attained may be repeated only once under the repeat-to-replace option. Students are not required to repeat an F grade unless the course is specifically required for graduation. Students should be aware that all grades are displayed on the official transcript even after the repeat. All Schools and Colleges within the University will honor any previously granted repeats from other Schools and Colleges within the University.

A repeat form must be filed to activate this option. For courses retaken for which this option is not requested, both grades will be used in the grade point average calculation, but students cannot receive double credit in hours required for the degree. Permission will not be granted for a student to repeat lower level courses after a higher level course in the sequence has been passed.

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Dean’s List and Dean’s Scholar

University Policy
Requirements for Dean's List and Dean's Scholar classifications are determined by each academic unit. Please refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Undergraduate students in Engineering Fundamentals and Departmental Studies who complete twelve or more (nine or more in summer terms) graded credits are eligible for the Dean’s List and designation as Dean’s Scholar. The following distinctions are made:

  • Dean’s List........    GPA > 3.5, with no grades of “I”, “X”, “U”, “D”, or “F”
  • Dean’s Scholar...    GPA = 4.0, with no grades of “I”, “X”, or “U”


Grades of “P” are not prohibited in Dean’s List or Dean’s Scholar qualifications, but cannot be used to meet the graded-credits minimum requirement. Honor certificates for those receiving these distinctions are available online through the student’s ULink account.

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Dropping, Adding, and Withdrawing Courses

University Policy
A student’s drop/add form must be approved according to the procedure for the academic unit in which the student is enrolled. Students may consult the Registration Information newspaper for detailed information concerning unit procedures for drop/add and for permission to enter closed classes.  If the addition of courses increases the tuition for the student, the student will be required to settle their account by the end of the first week of classes.

A grade of “W” will be reflected on students’ official transcripts for all courses officially dropped after the last day of drop/add.

Students who make a complete withdrawal from all courses for a particular semester must process this in accordance with the procedures established by their academic unit.

Late complete withdrawals are those requested after the official deadline to withdraw has passed. Proper documentation of special circumstances must accompany the petition for a late complete withdrawal, which the student shall submit to the appropriate official or committee of the enrollment unit. The enrollment unit shall request and consider all instructors’ recommendations in deciding on the petition.

Withdrawal Policy
The effective withdrawal date is the date on which the Registrar's Office, or its designated representatives during evening hours and at external campus offices, receives the appropriately signed drop form, or the date the drop/withdrawal is processed through the web. This date is used in calculating any refund or tuition reduction due if withdrawal deadlines are met. The last day to withdraw for each semester is published in the Registration Information newspaper, and for normal duration courses in the Fall and Spring semesters, is set in the eighth week of the semester. A grade of "W" will be reflected on students' official transcripts for all courses officially dropped after the last day to drop/add. Students who make a complete withdrawal from all courses for a particular semester must process this in accordance with the procedures established by their academic unit. When a student officially withdraws (see definition of effective withdrawal date above) from the University or from any course, or courses, for which hourly rates apply, tuition will be adjusted in the following manner:

Tuition Charge/Credit

  • Withdrawal through the first week of semester: 0% / 100%
  • Withdrawal during second or third week of semester: 50% / 50%
  • Withdrawal during fourth week of semester: 75% / 25%
  • Withdrawal after fourth week of semester: 100% / 0%


Summer terms and some regular semester courses vary in length and the percentages of refunds are modified. Effective dates are printed for special terms and courses in the Registration Information newspaper or are available from the Registrar's Office. Special course fees are refundable only with 100% adjustment.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Students wishing to alter their schedule of courses in any way must do so officially through the online registration process or on a drop/add form, available in the Office of Academic Affairs.  Signatures are not required to drop or add if done before the last official day to drop/add a course. Students may add courses to their schedules only within the first week of the semester. The last day to add is also the last day to delete a course from your record. After that date, a grade of "W" is assigned for all withdrawals during the first half of the semester (each semester the registrar will set and publish the actual withdrawal deadline). No student may withdraw during the last half of the semester. Failure to complete this official change or withdrawal process will result in a grade of “F” in each course in which the student is officially enrolled and not attending.

After the deadlines pass, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs may grant a student’s request to delete or withdraw courses because of sickness or conditions beyond the student’s control.   Students may appeal decisions on late withdrawals by petitioning the Standards and Admissions Committee.  The petition is online at http://louisville.edu/speed/academics/forms/advising/SACPetition.pdf.

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Final Examinations

University Policy
If a final exam is required for a course, the date and time is determined by a University-wide schedule based on the days of the week and times the course meets.  The final exam schedule can be found on the Registrar’s Office home page at http://louisville.edu/registrar/finals.html.

Final examination policies are determined by each academic unit. Please refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
The final examination is defined as the last examination in a course administered during the appropriate period in the published Final Exam Schedule. Types of final exams are in‐class comprehensive, take‐home comprehensive, in‐class limited‐scope, take‐home limited‐scope, and projects that serve as final exams. 

A final exam is mandatory for all undergraduate (below 500‐level) lecture courses and for all undergraduate (below 500‐level) combination lecture/laboratory courses where a single grade is assigned. A final exam is optional for undergraduate (below 500‐level) laboratory, design, seminar, project‐oriented, and team‐taught courses, with the instructor (s) responsible for deciding whether or not to administer a final exam. 

Final exams will be administered only during the appropriate period in the published Final Exam Schedule. Exceptions are take‐home final exams, which will be due during the appropriate period for the course in the published Final Exam Schedule.

Students must be notified of the type of final exam and its percentage of the course grade. This information should be included in the course syllabus, which is to be made available at the first or second class meeting (Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities).

Final exams for different courses (other than multiple sections of the same course) shall not be administered concurrently in the same classroom or auditorium.

No tests or quizzes are to be given during the last regularly‐scheduled class meeting of the semester or term. New projects shall not be assigned during the last seven calendar days immediately prior to the beginning of the Final Exam Schedule, unless the project is a final exam. The approved policy on final examinations is available at http://speed.louisville.edu/policies/finals.pdf.

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Grading and Course Numbering Systems

University Policy
Undergraduate grading system
The University awards letter grades which are translated into quality points to determine the grade point average or point standing. The “+/-” grading system may be used to help students understand their performance more accurately. Under this system, quality points are assigned as follows:

A = 4.0 C= 2.0
A- = 3.7 C- = 1.7
B+ = 3.3 D+ = 1.3
B = 3.0 D = 1.0
B- = 2.7 D- = 0.7
C+ = 2.3 F = 0.0


The grade of A+ is given for extraordinary work and appears on the transcript with the “plus” qualification, but it awards no additional quality point value in the calculation of the grade point average.

“F” means Not Passing and earns neither semester hours toward graduation nor quality points; however, the number of semester hours attempted is computed into the point standing, so that “F” has a negative effect on the point standing.

Other letter grades include the following:

  • “AU” means Audit and does not enter into the point standing.
  • "I" means 'Work in Course is Incomplete. This grade does not enter into the point standing. The grade and quality points awarded when the incomplete is made up (or the "F" that is given by default if the incomplete is not made up by the last day of final examinations of the next fall or spring semester) become part of the point standing at that time.
  • “P” means Passing in a course taken on a pass-fail basis. A grade of “P” is given for achievement equivalent to the standards for the grades “A” through “D” in the same course. A “P” does not enter into the point standing, but earns the designated number of semester hours.
  • ”S” and “U” mean Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory. These grades are used only for certain courses, and are not available by student option. Courses using these grades will earn semester hours, but those hours may not be counted toward the minimum number of hours required for graduation or a degree. “S” and “U” do not affect the point standing.
  • “W” means Withdrew and does not enter into the point standing.
  • “X” means the work is not finished because of the nature of the study. This grade is available only for graduate level courses.

All missing grades change to failing grades one year after the completion of the semester in which the course was taken.

University grade point average (GPA)
The student’s grade-point average is determined by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted. The number of hours attempted is computed by adding the hours for all courses in which the student has earned grades. The overall point standing takes into account all work taken at the University. Courses numbered below the 100 level (000–099) taken in the 1998 Fall Semester or after will not be used in the earned hours or University Grade Point Average calculations. However, decisions involving probation, dismissal, honors and eligibility for graduation are defined by each academic unit. Grades and quality points earned at other institutions are not incorporated into the university grade point average. Students should review the unit sections to determine how their enrollment unit uses transfer credit grades in the calculation of the grade point average.

Course numbering system
Each course has an alphabetic subject area code and a three-digit number. Within each department these numbers are used to identify the courses.

  • Freshman courses are numbered 100 to 199.
  • Sophomore courses are numbered 200 to 299.
  • Junior courses are numbered 300 to 399.
  • Senior courses are numbered 400 to 499.
  • Senior and graduate courses are numbered 500 to 599.
  • Graduate courses are numbered 600 to 799.


In registering to enroll for courses during a particular term, students are required to use a unique four digit course code, available in the university course schedule, to designate the particular course section in which they seek to enroll.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Program grade point average (GPA)
A program GPA is calculated by including only those courses used to satisfy degree requirements.  Courses for which transfer credit has been awarded are not included in the calculation.  While academic actions (warning, probation, suspension) are based on university GPA, the program GPA is used for determination of honors and satisfaction of degree requirements.

500-Level courses
Courses with numbers from 500 to 599 may be open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Graduate students who wish to receive graduate credit for 500-level courses must demonstrate a level of mastery of the course material substantially above that required for undergraduate credit. This mastery must be verified in writing by the instructor if graduate credit is requested after course is completed. Demonstration of an appropriate degree of mastery may include term papers, independent study, comprehensive examinations, or other more stringent requirements than those applied for undergraduate credit. The nature of the differences between the requirements for graduate credit and those for undergraduate credit must be described in course syllabi. Students are advised to consult their department for information on any particular 500-level course.

600-Level Courses
Courses numbered 600 and above are primarily for graduate students.  Undergraduate students who are within 6 semester hours of completing baccalaureate requirements may register in 600-level graduate courses, with the permission of the instructor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.  It is understood that such courses will replace courses in the normal undergraduate curriculum and therefore cannot be used for subsequent graduate credit. 

Subsequent graduate credit can be obtained only if these courses have not been used to satisfy part of baccalaureate requirements, and if the recommendation of the chairman of the department involved and the approval of the Associate Dean are obtained. 

A maximum of six hours of graduate level courses taken as an undergraduate may be used to satisfy master degree requirements; these courses should not have been used to also satisfy B.S. degree requirements.

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Graduation and Degree Requirements

University Policy
The conferring of degrees by the University of Louisville is conditional upon completion of all requirements in the opinion of the Dean/Director and faculty, regardless of the students’ participation in Commencement or any other representations by University employees. The student is responsible for submitting an application for a degree in a timely manner to be considered for a degree.

Commencements are scheduled for May and December. Commencement information and current schedules are available on the web at http://louisville.edu/commencement. Graduates participating in the commencement ceremonies must order academic apparel before the deadline stated on the website.

All graduating students must apply for their degrees online according to deadlines stated in the Registration Information newspaper
(dates also available on the web at http://louisville.edu/registrar/registration-information/specday.html.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Students are strongly urged to request a preliminary degree check prior to their final semester so that possible deficiencies in degree requirements can be identified early.  

Application for Graduation
Each degree candidate must complete an on-line degree application at the beginning of the semester in which the candidate intends to graduate. Any candidate removed from the graduation list must later reapply for the degree. Candidates should apply for the degree on ULink at http://ulink.louisville.edu. It is the responsibility of the student to submit an application for degree by the specified date.

Graduation and Degree Requirements
Degree requirements for all B.S. degrees granted by the J.B. Speed School of Engineering will be based upon the course requirements that are in effect at the time of admission to the School of Engineering.  If an applicant has been admitted several times, the degree requirements in effect at the most recent time of admission will apply.

The following graduation and degree requirements apply to all B.S. engineering degrees.  The student must:

  • complete an online degree application by the specified date.
  • satisfy all university General Education requirements.
  • have credit for each of the three cooperative education work terms.
  • complete all required courses and program requirements listed in the Degree Program section of this catalog.
  • complete 30 of the last 36 hours in residence at the University of Louisville.
  • have neither missing nor outstanding “I” or “X” grades.
  • have a cumulative university GPA of at least 2.00.
  • have a cumulative program GPA of at least 2.00.
  • be discharged of all financial obligations to the University.
  • be formally recommended for the Bachelor of Science degree by the J.B. Speed School of Engineering Faculty Assembly and by the Dean and must be approved for the degree by the Board of Trustees.


Second Bachelor’s Degree
To be awarded a second bachelor’s degree, students must earn a minimum of thirty additional semester hours from the School of Engineering.  For students pursuing two degrees simultaneously, these thirty hours will be added to the minimum total of semester hours needed for the degree seeking the least number of hours.  In addition, satisfaction of the requirements for co-op must have approval of both departments.

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Graduation with Academic Honors

University Policy
Requirements for graduation with academic honors are determined by each academic unit. Please refer to unit information below.
 
Speed School of Engineering Policy
Students who have completed one-half of the credit hours required in their undergraduate degree program while enrolled in the J.B. Speed School of Engineering will be eligible to graduate with Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors. Honor graduates must meet the following minimum university and program grade point averages upon completion of their final semester:

  • Degree with Honors: 3.25
  • Degree with High Honors: 3.50
  • Degree with Highest Honors: 3.75

 

Incomplete Course Work

University Policy
Requirements for incomplete course work are determined by each academic unit. Please refer to unit information below.
 
Speed School of Engineering Policy
In the event a student is passing a course but is unable to complete the course requirements by the end of the semester because of circumstances beyond their control, the instructor has the option to award "I" in place of the grade. "I" means work in the course is Incomplete and it is a temporary grade which does not enter into grade point average computation.  The student has until the end of the next Fall or Spring semester to complete the required course work. If the work is not completed by this deadline, the grade will automatically change to "F".  When the required work is completed, the instructor will submit a grade authorization form changing the “I” to the letter grade earned.

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Internships, Cooperatives, and Independent Study

University Policy
Internship and extramural policies are determined by each academic unit. Please refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Independent study courses
Enrollment in an independent study course provides the opportunity for the student, under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member, to pursue individualized study related to research and/or the practice of engineering that is not included in courses in the curriculum. The student must present an approved written plan that includes the purpose, rationale, activities planned, and expected results. A title for this individualized study course will be assigned by the supervising faculty member and will appear on the student’s academic record.   Students must obtain approval from the instructor, department chair, and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.  An independent study course is not permitted to duplicate an existing lecture course. Independent study enrollments will not be included in the assigned instructional workload of faculty, because of difficulties encountered in evaluating percentage instructional effort and performance in this category.

Cooperative education
The principal purpose of the J.B. Speed School of Engineering is to give the student a thorough, well-balanced training in engineering and applied science as preparation for entry into the profession of engineering. By pursuing an integrated program of both on-campus and employment learning experiences, a student has the opportunity to observe and participate in the practice of engineering. The Engineering Office of Career Development assists each student in obtaining a suitable cooperative work assignment in business and industry or government locally, statewide, regionally, and nationally. During each co-op assignment, students work full-time and receive a salary from their employer.  

Objectives of Cooperative Education

  • To provide students with experience in the job search process.
  • To provide an opportunity for discipline related learning experience in the work place to expand and enrich the student’s academic training.
  • To provide an opportunity to integrate classroom theory with workplace practice.
  • To provide an opportunity for students to assess engineering as a career choice relative to their individual skills and interests.
  • To encourage development of critical competencies such as communication, teamwork, and management skills.
  • To enable students to develop a knowledge and understanding of engineering applications in business.
  • To assist students in developing an understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities.


Engineering Cooperative Education
In order to qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree, students must successfully complete three co-ops within an area directly related to their degree specialization.  

Eligibility for Co-op
Co-op eligibility is dependent upon the student’s admission to an academic department, being in good standing within Speed School, and upon completion of pre- and co-requisites for the Co-op 288 Seminar (288). Students must be enrolled in the Co-op Seminar (288) in a semester preceding their first cooperative work assignment.  In addition, transfer students must have completed at least one semester of full-time coursework in Speed School including the Co-op Seminar (288) before their first co-op.

Student Responsibilities

  • Students will alternate co-ops with semesters of full-time class work.
  • Students are required to register for the co-op prior to the beginning of each work term.
  • Students are expected to work the dates of co-op designated by the Engineering Career Development Office.
  • In order to achieve the objectives of Cooperative EducationUnless specifically approved by the co-op coordinator, all co-op work terms will be conducted with the same employer.
  • Students are employees of the company or organization while they are on co-op and are subject to employer rules and regulations. Students are expected to maintain the highest performance and behavioral standards while on co-op.
  • If a student is terminated from cooperative employment or otherwise disciplined for any reason, it must be immediately reported by the student to the co-op coordinator. A student who is terminated for any reason other than the employer’s business conditions will receive an “F” grade in co-op and, in addition, may be subject to academic sanctions as well as disciplinary action in accordance with the Code of Student Conduct.


The University is not liable for any accident or injury involving a co-op student. However, it is the responsibility of the student to see that any serious accident or injury is reported, at the earliest opportunity, to the co-op coordinator. Students are required to sign and abide by the policies and procedures set forth in the Cooperative Education Student Agreement provided in the co-op seminar.

Salary
In general, students are classified as temporary full-time employees and are paid on an hourly basis while on co-op.  Pay rates vary according to employer and location.

Length of Employment
In order to be eligible to receive the Master of Engineering degree, all candidates must have completed three alternating cooperative semesters, totaling one year’s duration.

Course Enrollment During Co-op
In general, academic coursework is not allowed during the co-op work period.  In some instances, with approval, a student may enroll for academic coursework not exceeding four semester hours during any co-op period. Approval will be given only for academic coursework that is taken outside normal working hours (8:00 – 5:00) and which does not interfere with the co-op work assignment.  Permission to take a course must be obtained prior to the beginning of the co-op period. Request forms are available from the Engineering Office of Career Development and on the co-op website.

Evaluation and Academic Credit
Co-op students are graded on a pass/fail basis and earn two semester hours of credit for each completed co-op, for a total of six semester hours. At the conclusion of a co-op semester, each student is evaluated by the appropriate employer representative. This evaluation will assist in the development and counseling of the student and will become a permanent part of the student’s file.  Each student is required to submit a written report along with the employer evaluation at the end of each co-op period. The report will be reviewed by the co-op coordinator and graded by faculty in the student’s major department.

Advanced Credit

Advanced credit for co-op may be awarded upon approval of the department chair, the Director of Career Development and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Students who performed full-time work of a technical nature before entering Speed School and students who have had military experience are eligible. A letter is required from the employer verifying the dates and the nature of the employment. In the case of military experience, veterans may submit a copy of their separation form in lieu of the employer’s letter. Students who participate in ROTC or military summer camp may receive credit for one co-op (2 hours).

Forms for advanced credit are available from the Engineering Office of Career Development. Part-time work or work performed subsequent to entering Speed School will not qualify for advanced credit. If the work, however, was comparable to a co-op assignment and was performed during a semester in which the student was enrolled for no more than four semester hours, then the student may be eligible, upon approval, for back registration.  The student must pay tuition for the two hours of credit and will be expected to fulfill normal course requirements for co-op, including submission of a co-op report and employer evaluation.

Employment Opportunities
Securing a co-op position is affected by general economic conditions and particular employer specifications.  Therefore, the University cannot guarantee employment. However, every effort will be made to assist students in finding cooperative assignments appropriate to their specialization and personal preference. Students who obtain their own co-op employment must have the approval of the cooperative education coordinator and are subject to the policies and procedures stated herein and the Cooperative Education Student Agreement.

Waiver Policy
When a student experiences extreme difficulty in obtaining a suitable co-op position, that student may seek an administrative waiver from the department chair and the Director of Career Development. Waiver recipients are required to complete a minimum of three semester hours of additional courses for each cooperative period waived. The three semester hours must be in addition to courses required for the baccalaureate degree and must be approved by the department chair.

International Students Exemption
A student who holds a student visa is exempt from the mandatory cooperative education requirement. The six semester hours of co-op work experience will be replaced by six semester hours of courses approved by the department.

Graduate Career Employment

Graduating students and alumni should register with the Engineering Career Development Center for job search assistance. On-campus interviews, individual counseling, and group information sessions are conducted throughout the year.

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Codes of Student Conduct, Rights, and Responsibilities


Student Advocate
The student advocate maintains confidential contacts with students, institutional officers, faculty and staff to offer informal, alternative means to resolve student complaints; to provide a "one-stop" contact for students who need advice and support in navigating through institutional policies, procedures and bureaucracy; and to negotiate institutional barriers so that students can be successful in school. The student advocate investigates and takes action for a timely resolution of complaints brought by students. The student advocate familiarizes students with unit policies and procedures in compliance with FERPA in order to improve student retention.

The student advocate works closely and cooperatively with student affairs offices, academic units, staff and faculty to maintain open lines of communication to promote available student services to students.

Questions and concern may be addressed by e-mail to advocate@louisville.edu or by phone to (502) 852-8113.

Code of Student Conduct
The University's Code of Student Conduct is the University's policy regarding non-academic discipline of students.  Academic misconduct is not covered by this Code, but rather falls within the jurisdiction of the individual academic units of the University.  The primary purpose for the imposition of non-academic discipline in the university setting is to protect and preserve a quality educational environment in the campus community.  The Board of Trustees has the authority to modify the Code of Student Conduct.

The Code is set forth in writing in order to give students general notice of non-academic prohibited conduct.  This Code is on the web at http://louisville.edu/dos/policies-and-procedures/code-of-student-conduct.html or contact the Dean of Students Office, SAC W301.

Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities

Section 1. Purpose
The Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities is set forth in writing in order to give students general notice of certain of their rights and responsibilities at the University of Louisville. Further rights and responsibilities are set forth in other University rules and policies, including the Code of Student Conduct, Residence Hall contracts, and academic unit bulletins. It is the students’ responsibility to be aware of all University rules and policies; students should check with the Dean of Students Office and with their academic units if they have any questions about the purposes or intent of these policies.

The University is a public educational institution for adults rather than a custodial institution. Consistent with the role of the University to educate its students and to stimulate student autonomy and independence, University regulation and supervision of student life on and off campus is limited. The University does not assume responsibility or liability for the conduct of its students; responsibility and liability for student conduct rests with the student as inherent attributes of his or her adult status, concurrently with the student’s freedom of choice regarding his or her presence at the University and his or her own conduct and associations.

Section 2. Definitions
When used in this Code:

  1. The term “academic dishonesty” means obtaining or seeking to obtain an unfair academic advantage for oneself or for any other student; it includes lying, cheating, stealing, or engaging in otherwise dishonest conduct in the course of or related to any academic exercise.
  2. The term “academic exercise” means a test, quiz, examination, speech, presentation, paper, field or laboratory work, or any other academic activity on which a student is evaluated.
  3. The term “group” means a number of persons who are associated with each other and who have not complied with the University requirements for recognition as an organization.
  4. The term “organization” means a number of persons who are associated with each other and who have complied with the University requirements for  recognition.
  5. The term “student” means any person taking courses at the University, either full time or part time, pursuing undergraduate, graduate or extension studies on a regular quarter, semester, or summer term basis.
  6. The term “student broadcast” means oral material published on a student operated radio or television station.
  7. The term “student press” means either a student publication or a student broadcast.
  8. The term “student publication” means written material published by a student organization.
  9. The term “teacher” means any person hired by the University to conduct classroom activities. In certain situations, a person may be both “student” and “teacher.”   Determination of the person’s status in a particular situation shall be determined by the surrounding circumstances.
  10. The term “University” means the University of Louisville and, collectively, those responsible for its control and operation.

 

Section 3. Admission and Financial Aid
All applicants for admission and financial aid to the University shall be considered without regard for race, color, national origin, religion, sex, handicap not affecting qualification, or political beliefs.

Section 4. Classroom Rights and Responsibilities

  1. A student shall be evaluated on demonstrated knowledge and academic performance, and not on the basis of personal or political beliefs or on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap not affecting academic performance.
  2. A student has freedom of inquiry, of legitimate classroom discussion, and of free expression of his or her opinion, subject to the teacher’s responsibilities to maintain order and to complete the course requirements.
  3. A student is responsible for fulfilling the stated requirements of all courses in which he or she is enrolled.
  4. A student has the right:
    1. to be informed in reasonable detail at the first or second class meeting about the nature of the course and to expect the course to correspond generally to its description in the appropriate University catalog or bulletin;
    2. to be informed in writing and in reasonable detail at the first or second class meeting of course requirements and assignments;
    3. to be informed in writing and in reasonable detail at the first or second class meeting of standards and methods used in evaluating the student’s academic performance;
    4. to be informed in writing Of any necessary changes in assignments, requirements, or methods of grading during the semester with the reasons for such changes.
  5. A student has the right to confidentiality in the student/teacher relationship regarding the student’s personal or political beliefs. Disclosures of a student’s personal or political beliefs, expressed in writing or in private conversation, shall not be made public without explicit permission of the student. Charges of violations of these classroom rights and responsibilities shall be handled through the appropriate academic unit level procedures.

 
Section 5. Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty is prohibited at the University of Louisville. It is a serious offense because it diminishes the quality of scholarship, makes accurate evaluation of student progress impossible, and defrauds those in society who must ultimately depend upon the knowledge and integrity of the institution and its students and faculty. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following:

A. Cheating:

  1. Using or attempting to use books, notes, study aids, calculators, or any other documents, devices, or information in any academic exercise without prior authorization by the teacher.
  2. Copying or attempting to copy from another person’s paper, report, laboratory work, computer program, or other work material in any academic exercise.
  3. Procuring or using tests or examinations, or any other information regarding the content of a test or examination, before the scheduled exercise without prior authorization by the teacher.
  4. Unauthorized communication during any academic exercise.
  5. Discussing the contents of tests or examinations with students who have not yet taken the tests or examinations if the instructor has forbidden such discussion.
  6. Sending a substitute to take one’s examination, test, or quiz, or to perform one’s field or laboratory work; acting as a substitute for another student at any examination, test, or quiz, or at a field or laboratory work assignment.
  7. Conducting research or preparing work for another student, or allowing others to conduct one’s research or prepare one’s work, without prior authorization by the teacher. Except when otherwise explicitly stated by the teacher, examination questions shall become public after they have been given.


B. Fabrication:
Inventing or making up data, research results, information, or procedures, such as:

  1. Inventing or making up data, research results, information, or procedures.
  2. Inventing a record of any portion thereof regarding internship, clinical, or practicum experience.


C. Falsification:
Altering or falsifying information, such as:

  1. Changing grade reports or other academic records.
  2. Altering the record of experimental procedures, data, or results.
  3. Altering the record of or reporting false information about internship, clinical, or practicum experiences.
  4. Forging someone’s signature or identification on an academic record.
  5. Altering a returned examination paper in order to claim that the examination was graded erroneously.
  6. Falsely citing a source of information.


D. Multiple Submission:

The submission of substantial portions of the same academic work, including oral reports, for credit more than once without prior authorization by the teacher involved.

E. Plagiarism:

Representing the words or ideas of someone else as one’s own in any academic exercise, such as:

  1. Submitting as one’s own a paper written by another person or by a commercial “ghost writing” service,
  2. Exactly reproducing someone else’s words without identifying the words with quotation marks or by appropriate indentation, or without properly citing the quotation in a footnote or reference.
  3. Paraphrasing or summarizing someone else’s work without acknowledging the source with a footnote or reference.
  4. Using facts, data, graphs, charts, or other information without acknowledging the source with a footnote or reference. Borrowed facts or information obtained in one’s research or reading must be acknowledged unless they are “common knowledge”. Clear examples of “common knowledge” include the names of leaders of prominent nations, basic scientific laws, and the meaning of fundamental concepts and principles in a discipline. The specific audience for which a paper is written may determine what can be viewed as “Common knowledge”: for example, the facts commonly known by a group of chemists will differ radically from those known by a more general audience. Students should check with their teachers regarding what can be viewed as “common knowledge” within a specific field or assignment, but often the student will have to make the final judgment. When in doubt, footnotes or references should be used.


F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty:
Helping or attempting to commit an academically dishonest act. The academic units may have additional guidelines regarding academic dishonesty. It is the student’s responsibility to check with their teachers and academic units to obtain those guidelines.

Section 6. Discipline Procedures for Academic Dishonesty
Charges of academic dishonesty shall be handled through the appropriate academic unit level procedures. An academic unit that determines that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty may impose any academic punishment on the student that it sees fit, including suspension or expulsion from the academic unit. A student has no right to appeal the final decision of an academic unit. However, a student who believes that he or she has been treated unfairly, has been discriminated against, or has had his or her rights abridged by the academic unit may file a grievance with the Unit Academic Grievance Committee, pursuant to the provisions of the Student Academic Grievance Procedure; the Unit Academic Grievance Committee may not substitute its judgment on the merits for the judgment of the academic unit. An academic unit that suspends or expels a student from the academic unit because the student has been found guilty of academic dishonesty may recommend to the University Provost in writing that the student also be suspended or expelled from all other programs and academic units of the University. Within four weeks of receiving such a recommendation, the Provost shall issue a written decision.

Neither the student nor the academic unit shall have the right to appeal the Provost’s decision. However, a student who believes that he or she has been treated unfairly, has been discriminated against, or has had his or her rights abridged by the issuance of a decision by the Provost may file a grievance with the University Student Grievance Committee, pursuant to the provisions of the Student Academic Grievance Procedure; the University Student Academic Grievance Committee may not substitute its judgment on the merits for the judgment of the Provost.

Section 7. Campus Expression

  1. A. Students have the right of freedom of expression to the extent allowed by law.
  2. Students may picket or demonstrate for a cause, subject to the following conditions:
    1. The students must act in an orderly and peaceful manner.
    2. The students must not in any way interfere with the proper functioning of the University.
    3. Where students demonstrate in an area not traditionally used as an open public forum, the University reserves the right to make reasonable restrictions as to time, place, and manner of the student demonstrations.
  3. Students may distribute written material on campus without prior approval, providing such distribution does not disrupt the operations of the University or violate University rules.
  4. Students may invite to campus and hear on campus speakers of their choice on subjects of their choice; approval will not be withheld by any University official for the purpose of censorship.


Section 8. The Student Press

  1. The student press is free to deal openly, fearlessly, and responsibly with issues of interest and importance to the academic community. There shall be no prior approval of student press content by the University.
  2. The student press is responsible for adhering to the canons of responsible journalism and for complying with the law. Student publications and broadcasts shall not publish libelous or slanderous matter, or any other content that violates the law.
  3. All student publications and broadcasts shall explicitly state that the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the University or its student body.
  4. Students may not be disciplined by the University for their participation with the student press except for violations of University rules that are not inconsistent with the guarantees contained herein.


Section 9. University Facilities

Appropriate University facilities shall be available to organizations within the University community for regular business meetings, for social programs, and for programs open to the public.

  1. Reasonable conditions may be imposed to regulate the timeliness of requests, to determine the appropriateness of the space assigned, to regulate time and use, and to insure proper maintenance.
  2. Preference may be given to programs designed for audiences consisting primarily of members of the University community.
  3. Allocation of space shall be made based on priority of requests and the demonstrated needs of the organization.
  4. Charges may be imposed for any unusual costs for use of facilities.
  5. Physical abuse of assigned facilities may result in reasonable limitations on future allocation of space to offending parties and will require restitution of damages.
  6. The organization requesting space must inform the University of the general purpose of any meeting open to persons other than members and the names of outside speakers.


Section 10. Use of University Name and Insignia

No individual, group, or organization may use the University name or insignia without the express authorization of the University except to identify the University affiliation. University approval or disapproval of any policy or issue may not be stated or implied by any individual, group, or organization.

Section 11. Campus Residence Facilities

Students have the right of privacy in campus residence facilities.

  1. Nothing in the University relationship or residence hall contract may expressly or implicitly give the institution or residence hall officials authority to consent to search of a student’s room or residence by police or other law enforcement officials unless they have obtained a search warrant.
  2. The University reserves the right to enter a student’s room in a residence hall or a student’s apartment in a campus residence:
    1. in emergencies where imminent danger to life, safety, health, or property is reasonably feared;
    2. to make necessary repairs, improvements, or alterations in the facility;
    3. to provide necessary pest control services;
    4. 4. to inspect the facility as deemed necessary by the University.


Section 12. Student Records
The privacy and confidentiality of all student records shall be preserved in accordance with applicable laws. The University shall establish and adhere to a clear and definitive records policy.

Section 13. Campus Organizations
Organizations and groups may be established within the University for any legal purpose. Affiliation with an extramural organization shall not, in itself, disqualify the University branch or chapter from University privileges. A group shall become a formally recognized organization through procedures established by the Student Government Association, upon approval of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

  1. Groups of a continuing nature must institute proceedings for formal recognition if they are to receive benefits from the University.
  2. Recognition of an organization by the University infers neither approval nor disapproval of the aims, objectives, and policies of the organization, nor liability for the actions of the organization.
  3. Membership in all University related organizations shall be open to any member of the University community who is willing to subscribe to the stated aims and meet the stated obligations of the organization, provided such aims and obligations are lawful.
  4. Membership lists are confidential and solely for the use of the organization, except that names and addresses of current organization officers shall be reported to the University as a condition of continuing University recognition.
  5. Any organization that engages in activities either on or off campus that are illegal or contrary to any University policy may have sanctions imposed against it, including withdrawal of University recognition.


Section 14. Promulgation of University Rules Affecting Students
Rules and Policies affecting the students shall be published in Student Handbook, in the appropriate University bulletins, or in any other appropriate publication prior to their enforcement. Included in the Student Handbook are the following: Academic Grievance Procedure, Code of Student Conduct, Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities, Policy on Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages for Recognized Student Organizations, Hazing and Initiation Activities Policy, Non-academic Grievance Policy and the Sexual Harassment Policy. Copies of the Student Handbook are available from the Dean of Students Office.

Plagiarism Prevention
Instructors may use a range of strategies (including plagiarism-prevention software at the university) to compare student works with private and public information resources in order to identify possible plagiarism and academic dishonesty. Comparisons of student works may require submitting a copy of the original work to the plagiarism-prevention service. The service may retain that copy in some circumstances.  Academic units or programs may establish a more rigorous standard of review or consent, which will be noted in the relevant guidelines.

Student Handbook
Other polices and information for students can be found in the Student Handbook, on-line at http://louisville.edu/student/students/policies

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Awarding of Credit through Placement Exams

University Policy

Advanced Placement Examinations of The College Board
In accordance with Kentucky Senate Bill 74, the University of Louisville awards credit for scores of 3 on all Advanced Placement Examinations of the College Board. A higher score may be required to receive credit for specific courses within certain disciplines. Elective credit will be awarded for Advanced Placement Examinations not listed or for scores of 3 when a higher score is required for specific course credit. Scores should be submitted to the Office of Admissions as soon as they are available.

Advanced placement scores and course equivalencies are available from the Office of Admissions.

College Level Examination Program of The College Board
The University awards credit on the basis of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) administered by The College Board. CLEP examinations may be taken at any national test center, including the University of Louisville Testing Service. Prior arrangements with the testing center must be made, and there is a fee for the general examination and for each subject examination. A CLEP Bulletin of Information for candidates may be obtained from most testing centers, or by writing the following address: CLEP, Box 1821, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

Scores obtained should be sent to the Office of Admissions. Areas of study, the amount of credit allowed, and minimum scores are determined by the Office of Admissions. Credit earned through CLEP does not count as credit earned in residence at the University of Louisville.

International Baccalaureate
The University awards academic credit to entering freshmen who have completed the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program. Credit will be awarded for certain IB Higher Level examinations completed with a score of 5 or higher, up to a maximum of 24 semester hours. There is no provision for awarding of credit for IB Standard Level examinations.

Scores and course equivalencies are available from the Office of Admissions.

Foreign Language Advanced Standing
Students who wish to continue the study of a foreign language begun in high school must take placement examinations in order to be placed at the appropriate level. To receive university credit for language study completed at the high school level, the placement examination is required before attempting university language study.

The placement exam is administered via the Internet, and can be completed at the Department of Classical and Modern Languages website.

The placement tests may not be used to earn credit if the student already has received college or university level credit in that language elsewhere or has enrolled in a course in that language at this university.

When a student places into a course higher than 121, credit toward graduation will be awarded for those elementary or intermediate courses by-passed only if the student completes successfully the language class into which she/he is placed. A student placing in the 300 level will receive 12 hours of "pass" credit for 121, 122, 123, or 221 (depending on the language) upon successful completion of a 300-level class in the language. (Eighteen hours of credit by placement are available in Spanish for students who test into 321, 322, or 355.) Any credit earned by placement testing will be posted on the student’s record only after completion of a regular semester of full-time study (or 12 semester hours) at the University of Louisville. Students should not enroll for credit in a course they have successfully bypassed through examination.

A student who has earned college credit for work done in high school may choose whether to use that credit OR the credit earned through the placement examination program described above. These regulations also apply to Metroversity students.

For foreign students whose previous academic work has been in a language other than English, the foreign language requirement for graduation will be waived automatically. No credit will be granted for 100- or 200-level language courses to any student for whom this is the native language. Students may obtain credit for courses in linguistics, culture, or literature numbered 300 or above in their native language by extramural examination or by taking the courses.

For information about placement examinations in American Sign Language, contact the coordinator of the http://www.interpreting.eku.edu/louisville.php 300 Robbins Hall, (502) 852-4607.

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Registration Policy

University Policy
Continuing Registration
Currently enrolled students are expected to register for the upcoming semester or term during the current semester by participating in continuing registration. During this period, students generally have a better chance of getting the courses they want at the desired time periods. The Registration Information newspaper and web have instructions for advising and registering via the web.

Open Registration
Students who do not participate in Continuing Registration may register by web in the days immediately preceding the start of the semester. Students should consult the appropriate unit section for procedures for students wishing to register in this fashion. A late payment fee of $50.00 may be assessed when student accounts are not financially settled by the end of the first week of classes.

E-Mail Notification
The university will use the e-mail system to remind students of some academic and financial deadlines as well as notification of cancelled courses. Please plan to check your campus e-mail account regularly, especially the week prior to the beginning of classes and the first several weeks of each semester.

Metroversity Registration
Kentuckiana Metroversity Inc., is a cooperative effort of seven institutions: Bellarmine University, Indiana University Southeast, Jefferson Community Technical Colleges, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Spalding University, and the University of Louisville. A full-time student at any one of these schools enjoys the opportunity of cross-registration, double-degree programs, library privileges, innovative off-campus experiences, and extracurricular activities on the other campuses of the consortium. Full-time University of Louisville students wishing to take courses at another Metroversity school should consult their academic advisor in the unit in which they are enrolled, as well as the Registrar’s Office, to ensure proper enrollment and recording of courses. Cross registration is permitted on a space available basis at the discretion of the member institutions.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
Concurrent registration in another institution
Students in the College of Engineering who wish to enroll in a course or courses at another institution must obtain prior permission. Such students should contact the Associate Dean of Academics for that permission.

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Residency Status

University Policy
Students earning baccalaureate degrees are required to complete 30 of their last 36 semester hours at the University of Louisville. Students earning associate degrees are required to complete a minimum of 15 of their last 18 semester hours at the University of Louisville. Individual academic units may have more stringent residency requirements. Please refer to unit information below.

Speed School of Engineering Policy
The J.B. Speed School of Engineering follows the general university policy.

Updated 6/16/2011

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