Events

Current Schedule

November iRIS Workshops



iRIS Specialists will be available for assistance with grants submissions, Institutional Review Board forms, and Attestation and Disclosure Forms in the iRIS system. Faculty and staff seeking assistance in iRIS are encouraged to drop in anytime during this time period for one-on-one instruction.

Belknap Campus Training Location and Dates:

Miller Information Technology Center

Room 3 (MITC 03)

2315 S 1st St #109

Friday, November 17th, 2017

9:30 am - 11:30 am

HSC Campus Training Location and Dates:

HSC K-Wing Instructional Computer Lab

555 South Floyd Street

Room 4007 (HK4007)

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

2:00pm - 4:00pm

For more information call 852-4715 or email Adrienne Dumke

Past Events

Presented by: Lauri Carlile, C.I.P., Chesapeake IRB; Nichelle Cobb,Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Robert Hood, Ph.D., AAHRPP; Megan Singleton, J.D., M.B.E., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Webinar: "AAHRPP Single IRB Review Standard"

This webinar provides an overview of AAHRPP’s requirements when organizations rely on other organizations for IRB review, or when serving as the IRB for another organization. AAHRPP will be introducing a new Standard that brings together all of AAHRPP’s requirements when sharing oversight. The new Standard was developed with input from a workgroup that includes members from universities, hospitals, research consortia, and independent IRBs.

Shumaker Bldg.

Room 139

2210 S Brook St

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Research! Louisville 2017 Event

Speaker: Dr. Sandra L. Hanson, Ph.D., MA., Catholic University

"Science for All? Diversity in Science in a Global Economy"

Guest Speaker, Dr. Sandra L. Hanson, Ph.D., MA. is a Professor of Sociology and Research Associate at the Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies at Catholic University. Her research examines the gender structure of educational and occupational systems in a comparative context. Professor Hanson's research on gender, race/ethnicity and science has been funded by multiple grants from the National Science Foundation. In Swimming Against the Tide: African American Girls in Science Education, she examined the experiences of African American girls in the science education system. Professor Hanson's book, Lost Talent: Women in the Sciences (Temple University Press, 1996), was a culmination of her research on the loss of talented young women in the science pipeline. Her recent books, Latinos and the American Dream (Texas A&M; University Press, 2016) and The American Dream in the 21st Century (Temple University Press, 2011), examine opportunity systems in the U.S. with a special focus on the American Dream. She has received a number of Fulbright awards to study gender systems in Eastern Europe and cross-nationally. Professor Hanson has testified before the U.S. House of Representative's Committee on Science and Technology hearing on "Encouraging the Participation of Female Students in STEM Fields." She is a Sigma Xi distinguished lecturer.

This presentation addresses the question of who will do science from a global perspective. It is argued that diversity in science results in better science. Cross-cultural variation in women’s access to science education and occupations is examined and sources of continued inequity are considered.

KCCTRB

505 S. Hancock Street

Room 124

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Presented by: Tony Corio, Grants Policy Analyst, OPERA, OER, NIH; Lauren Ruane, Grants Policy Analyst, OPERA, OER, NIH; Scarlett Gibb, Customer Relationship Manager, eRA, OER, NIH

"On RPPR policy and processes"

Did you know there are three types of Research Performance Progress Reports (RPPRs) associated with a NIH grant award? Can you name them? If you said “Annual, Interim, & Final RPPRs”…way to go! What does each one mean as an NIH grantee? What changes have been made in 2017 and what are still to come?

HSC K-Wing Bldg.

555 South Floyd Street

Room 2035

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

2:00pm - 3:30pm

Speaker: Debra Mathews, Ph.D., M.A.

"NCI Ethical aNd Regulatory Issues in Cancer ResearcH (ENRICH)Forum"

Join your expert presenter, Dr. Debra Mathews, an Assistant Director for Science Programs at the Berman Institute of Bioethics and Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University to explore the ethical issues surrounding compensation for tissue donation as well as continued research uses of HeLa tissue, including the HeLa genome, and discuss the different and sometimes contradictory views of Lacks family members regarding these uses

CTR Bldg.

505 S. Hancock Street

Room 123

Thursday, June 8, 2017

10:00 am - 11:00 am

Speaker: Christopher Francklyn, Ph.D., National Institutes of Health

"Specific Aims — The Logical Framework That Holds Your Grant Proposal Together"

Join your expert presenter, Dr. Christopher Francklyn, an NIH investigator and reviewer to gain first-hand knowledge on:

  • Using the Specific Aims page as a “foundation” during the writing of the application.
  • The essential components of the Specific Aims page and how to write them.
  • How many Aims should you include? Can there be too few or too many?
  • Explain the importance of the Specific Aims page relative to the other parts of the application.
  • The importance – or not – of the hypothesis during the writing of your Specific Aims page.
  • How to use your Specific Aims page to convince reviewers your work has Impact.

In this comprehensive Webinar, examples of some of the top grant-awarding foundations will be discussed, including their application and approval process, along with the purpose for the funds they provide (ie: research grants, fellowships, student stipends). Also covered will be non-profit organization philosophies towards awarding grants, highlighting the mind set similarities and differences from federal granting agencies. Tips will also be presented to help you find out about these organizations and how to best approach them with your ideas, along with how your past or current funding status can affect a foundation’s decision to support you.

CTR Bldg.

505 S. Hancock Street

Room 123

Friday, April 28th 2017

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm


Two Seminars by Dr. George Weiblen, Ph.D.

Sigma XI Distinguished Lecturer

Professor in Plant Biology,

University of Minnesota will present:

"Biodiversity discovery on the rain forest frontier"

Belknap – Ekstrom Library

Room W104

2215 S 3rd St.

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

“The coevolutionary microcosm: plants, pollinators, and parasites"

Shumaker Bldg.

Room 139

2210 S Brook St

Friday, November 11th, 2016

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm


Webinar: "Understanding Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR)"

J.D. Nichols Bldg.

Room 301 South

300 E. Market St.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Webinar: "Building Research Capacity"

Belknap – Ekstrom Library

Room W104

2215 S 3rd St.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm


Meet and Greet

You are invited to join the offices of Research Integrity, iRIS, Conflict of Interest, Information Security, Institutional Compliance, Office of Industry Engagement, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Human Subjects Protection Program, Sponsored Programs, Research Resources Facilities, and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee for FREE ice cream and door prizes!!!


"Building a Relationship with your Research Integrity Office"

Institutional review boards (IRBs) and research integrity offices (RIOs) play distinct but related roles in research oversight and compliance. Oftentimes, the jurisdiction of these two bodies overlap, resulting in investigators, research staff, and other stakeholders, approaching both entities with the same questions and issues. It’s critical to understand the differences between each group’s purviews, and the importance of open and effective communication during the research review process.

During this webinar, Ross Hickey, JD, CIP, CPIA will discuss best practices for effective communication and relationship-building among IRBs, RIOs, and their respective staff and members that can apply to a variety of organizational structures. Using case studies from biomedical and social and behavioral research, this webinar will cover considerations for IRBs and RIOs in research review, study design, data integrity, and research misconduct.

What will I learn?

After attending this webinar, attendees will be able to:

  • Differentiate between the jurisdiction and responsibilities of the IRB and the RIO when it comes to addressing research inquiries and handling allegations of research misconduct
  • Understand the different structures in which RIOs, IRBs, and other institutional bodies can be organized
  • Facilitate effective communication between all parties

Who should attend?

This basic-level webinar will be of value to IRB professionals who work in both biomedical and social and behavioral research, as well as other stakeholders in the research enterprise.


Research! Louisville 2015 Event

Speaker: Elizabeth Heitman, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

"Ethical Considerations in the Management of Research Data: Before, During, and After the Project"


"Working with Industry: A University Perspective"

As federal funds are declining and becoming more competitive, Universities are working with industry more often. Industry contracts can be intimidating because they often contain complex intellectual property terms and confidentiality provisions. This webinar will explore University/Industry research collaborations from both a university perspective as well as an industry perspective. We will address common contract issues, cultural differences, and the benefits of university/industry partnerships.


"Foundations and Societies: A Strong Funding Ally for Biomed Researchers"

The majority of scientific funding in the US has traditionally come from the Federal Government through agencies such as the NIH, NSF, and the DOD. While these agencies continue to fund the majority of academic throughout the country, non-profit organizations are an additional source of funding available to biomedical researchers. For federal grants, substantial preliminary data must often be presented in order to be competitive and have any chance of being awarded funds. While your application may be for basic research, it is often stated and expected by the agency that this work will have a translational component.

These same criteria hold true for many non-government, non-profit foundations and societies that award research monies. In fact, many non-profit organizations appear to favor translational types of studies, with the name of the organization often indicating the specific area they support (ie: Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation). With federal spending being cut and funding for basic research continuing to feel the effects of having to do more with less money, researchers will be looking more aggressively towards non-profit foundations and societies to support their disease-related work.

In this comprehensive Webinar, examples of some of the top grant-awarding foundations will be discussed, including their application and approval process, along with the purpose for the funds they provide (ie: research grants, fellowships, student stipends). Also covered will be non-profit organization philosophies towards awarding grants, highlighting the mind set similarities and differences from federal granting agencies. Tips will also be presented to help you find out about these organizations and how to best approach them with your ideas, along with how your past or current funding status can affect a foundation’s decision to support you.


"New NIH Biosketch Format: Keys to Writing a Compelling Scientific Narrative"

Writing a convincing narrative of your scientific career is easier said than done. The most challenging areas for researchers include not knowing what to include, what to leave out, and how to best indicate the influence your work has had, among others.

During this information-packed webinar, your expert presenter will cover the changes made to the biosketch which involve telling your scientific story. Such a story should feature your major accomplishments as they lead to the current grant you are requesting.

This Webinar will also cover which accomplishments to include and what not to mention. How to highlight your most important work without sounding self-serving and the basic components of a solid narrative that will grab the attention of the reviewers and put them in your corner for the review. Early investigators are likely not to have a long track record for the narrative, therefore, your presenter will cover career-stage specific aspects of the narrative that tell your story in a unique way and highlight why you are the person to get the grant and do the job.

Webinar: "What’s New at the NIH? Requirements to Address Rigor and Reproducibility in Research Grant Applications"

Webinar: "Research Misconduct: What's in a Name?"

Webinar: "Crisis Communication and Basic Disaster Planning for the Research Administrator"

Webinar: "Regulatory and Operational Considerations for Bio-repositories"