Areas of Concentration

Information Technology and Digital Politics

Information Technology and Digital Politics is a specialty within political science that cuts across multiple academic disciplines and sub-disciplines within political science. The common thread is that it focuses on how the use of modern technology including computers, the Internet, social media, digital news, and more shapes political outcomes.  Faculty: Jason Abbott, David Buckley, Jason Gainous, Tricia Gray, Melissa Merry, Rodger Payne.

Comparative Politics

Comparative politics is a field in political science, characterized by an empirical approach based on the comparative method. In other words, comparative politics is the study of the domestic politics, political institutions, and conflicts of countries.  Faculty: Jason Abbott, Steven Brooke, David Buckley, Julie Bunck, Jason Gainous, Tricia Gray, Shiping Hua, Susan Matarese, Charles Ziegler.

International Politics

International politics is the way in which sovereign states interact with each other. International politics should not be confused with global politics, which incorporates the roles of global interest groups and corporations in addition to governments.  Faculty: Jason Abbott, Steven Brooke, David Buckley, Julie Bunck, Michael Fowler, Kris Grady, Tricia Gray, Shiping Hua, Rodger Payne, Charles Ziegler.

American Politics

The field of American Public Policy Studies involves the study of the American governmental institutions (executive, legislative, and judicial) that formulate public policy, and the study of the administration of public policy. Specific areas of faculty expertise include: social policy, housing policy, foreign policy, antipoverty policy, urban policy, environmental policy, feminist approaches to policy, and economic development policy.  Faculty: Dewey Clayton, Jasmine Farrier, Jason Gainous, David Imbroscio, Melissa Merry, Laura Moyer, Sherri Wallace.

Public Policy

Public policy is the principled guide to action taken by the administrative executive branches of the state with regard to a class of issues, in a manner consistent with law and institutional customs. The foundation of public policy is composed of national constitutional laws and regulations. Further substrates include both judicial interpretations and regulations which are generally authorized by legislation. Public policy is considered strong when it solves problems efficiently and effectively, serves justice, supports governmental institutions and policies, and encourages active citizenship.  The field of American Public Policy Studies involves the study of the American governmental institutions (executive, legislative, and judicial) that formulate public policy, and the study of the administration of public policy.  Faculty: Anne Caldwell, Dewey Clayton, David Imbroscio, Melissa Merry, Laura Moyer, Rodger Payne, Sherri Wallace, Charles Ziegler.