News

The Department of Pediatrics has been selected to receive the University of Louisville 2013 Paul Weber Award for Departmental Excellence in Teaching in recognition of its innovative teaching methods and commitment to educational excellence.

CONGRATULATIONS, 2014-15 Chief Residents

Congratulations to Jessica Schum, M.D. and Neil Patil, M.D. on being selected by their peers to serve as Chief Residents for 2014-2015 academic year.

Pediatricians Honored at UofL Fall Honors Convocation

Three University of Louisville pediatricians were tapped for awards at the UofL School of Medicine Fall Honors Convocation.

Charles R. Woods, M.D., M.S., received the Distinguished Educator Award. This is a lifetime achievement award which emphasizes his numerous accomplishments in the teaching arena and record of teaching excellence throughout his career. Woods is the vice-chair of faculty development for the Department of Pediatrics and a member of the department's Pediatric Education Leadership Team.

 

Kimberly A. Boland, M.D., received the Outstanding Educator Award which recognizes innovative, short-term achievements in graduate teaching. Boland’s recommendation for this award cites her for “regularly bringing innovation alongside ongoing diligence in her role as director of the Pediatrics Residency Program” and her role in developing a communication skills curriculum for pediatric residents.

Neonatologist Rodica M. Turcu, M.D., received the American Medical Women’s Association Gender Equity Award. The American Medical Women’s Association is an organization that works to advance women in medicine and improve women’s health.

New Pediatric Multi-Specialty Office Opens in East Louisville

University of Louisville Physicians-Pediatrics has opened a pediatric multi-specialty office in Brownsboro Crossing shopping center, in Norton Medical Plaza II, across from Kosair Children’s Medical Center-Brownsboro.

The office, which was partially funded with a $325,000 WHAS Crusade for Children grant to the University of Louisville Department of Pediatrics, will house eight UofL Physician’s pediatric subspecialty practices: Acupuncture, Endocrinology, Children's Metabolic Bone Center, Gastroenterology, Ophthalmology, Neurology, Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine.

“We opened this office to extend our reach down the I-71 corridor, making critical pediatric specialty care more easily available to children and families from Oldham, Shelby and Carroll Counties,” said Gerard Rabalais, M.D., chairman, University of Louisville Department of Pediatrics.

The 7,500-square-foot office has 17 exam rooms, two intake rooms, a lab, a procedure room and a large waiting room with a quiet area for anxious children. There is an administrative area, as well as space where providers can access electronic medical records and teach UofL medical students and residents.

The exam rooms are intentionally larger than typical exam rooms to accommodate families who often accompany children on pediatric visits.  Two exam rooms are outfitted for exclusive use by pediatric acupuncture specialists and three rooms are dedicated to pediatric ophthalmology.

“As we developed this new office space we were able to consider the unique needs of children, especially those whose condition requires them to see multiple specialists, like a child with diabetes who needs ongoing ophthalmology care,” Rabalais said. “We are grateful to the WHAS Crusade for Children for helping us create this special place for children.”

University of Louisville Physiciansis the largest, multi-specialty physician practice in the Louisville region, with more than 78 sub specialties, 1,200 dedicated staff professionals and more than 500 primary care and specialty physicians. The group’s physicians also are professors and researchers at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, teaching tomorrow’s physicians and leading research in the most innovative medical advancements.

Pediatrics Tapped for Prestigious Teaching Award

Pediatrics Tapped for Prestigious Teaching Award

The Pediatric Education Leadership Team

The Department of Pediatrics has been selected to receive the University of Louisville 2013 Paul Weber Award for Departmental Excellence in Teaching in recognition of its innovative teaching methods and commitment to educational excellence.

The award was presented at this year’s Celebration of Teaching and Learning Feb. 7.

This teaching award was established in 2005 in memory of Paul Weber, a distinguished UofL teacher, scholar and mentor, and recognizes departments that demonstrate excellence in teaching.

“We are honored to be the first university department to receive this important teaching award,” said Gerard Rabalais, MD, MHA, chairman, Department of Pediatrics. “As pediatricians, we are trained to observe subtle growth and change in our patients.  As educators, we remain attuned to this same process in our community of learners.”

Experiential learning underpins all of the Department of Pediatrics’ medical education programming.

“Our faculty teach new medical students as well as senior residents, all the while maintaining our own lifelong learning profiles as we strive to keep pace with evolving technology, generational changes in learners and evolution of the country’s health care system,” said Kimberly Boland, MD, vice chair for pediatric medical education. “Our philosophy is to engage our learners by investing them in the educational process and integrating real-life applications of knowledge.”

Pediatrics has incorporated numerous innovative programs into its curriculum.

Each year, 20-26 rising second-year med students take a break from the classroom to participate in the Pediatric Summer Externship program. This four-week clinical experience provides a preview of pediatric medicine in private and academic offices and hospital settings.

A new procedure rotation gives pediatric residents the opportunity to hone their skills on 26 pediatric procedures, ranging from stitching up a wound to performing a spinal tap. This new rotation corrects a training shortcoming posed by duty hour limitations and the use of specialized hospital teams.

Trainees get to walk in the shoes of their patients through the Poverty and Social Justice in Child Health rotation. They must learn to negotiate a clinic trip on public transportation and to shop healthfully using food stamps. Time spent working with refugees and in community health centers broadens their understanding of the unique challenges of impoverished children and families.

Residents practice communications skills with patient actors. They also learn to advocate for children at the community and state level through the resident advocacy organization PUSH (Pediatricians Urging Safety and Health).

Faculty development is a priority. The department has developed a curriculum of more than 50 topics focused on improving teaching skills, mentoring, career development and research.

“We strive daily to prepare the complete pediatrician of tomorrow and enrich the practicing pediatrician of today by engaging them as learners, listening to their needs and integrating new knowledge with real-time experiences,” Boland said.

The department will receive a monetary award of $30,000 to support efforts to enhance critical thinking through faculty-generated projects.

“We plan to use the $30,000 award to integrate innovative technology into our core curriculum,” Boland said.

Pediatrics has received the Weber Award several times in previous years. In 2011, the award went to pediatric critical care specialists Aaron Calhoun, MD, and Katherine Potter, MD, and their pediatric simulation program. Amy Holthouser, MD, who has joint appointments in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, received the Weber Award in 2008.

Roman receives 2014 SSCI Founders Medal

Award recognizes education, research and patient care accomplishments of academicians.
Roman receives 2014 SSCI Founders Medal

U of L Department of Medicine Chairman Dr. Jesse Roman (right) with the 2014 SSCI Founders Medal which was presented by Dr. David Guidot (left) of Emory University.


Recognition from your peers is always a good thing.

Such is the case for Dr. Jesse Roman, who recently received the 2014 Founders Medal presented annually by the Southern Society for Clinical Investigation.

Roman, Chairman of the University of Louisville Department of Medicine, was given the award at the SSCI part of the 2014 Southern Regional Meetings in New Orleans.

Dr. David Guidot, his friend and former colleague at Emory University where Roman served prior to his appointment at U of L, presented the award.

The medal is given to academicians based on their accomplishments in education, research and patient care consistent with the mission of the SSCI.

Roman served as president of SSCI in 2009 and remains on its External Advisory Committee. He also currently chairs the Membership and Fund Raising Committees and hosts the Lung Club during the meeting every year.

The SSCI currently boasts 34 members from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine.

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Roman receives 2014 SSCI Founders Medal

Award recognizes education, research and patient care accomplishments of academicians.
Roman receives 2014 SSCI Founders Medal

U of L Department of Medicine Chairman Dr. Jesse Roman (right) with the 2014 SSCI Founders Medal which was presented by Dr. David Guidot (left) of Emory University.


Recognition from your peers is always a good thing.

Such is the case for Dr. Jesse Roman, who recently received the 2014 Founders Medal presented annually by the Southern Society for Clinical Investigation.

Roman, Chairman of the University of Louisville Department of Medicine, was given the award at the SSCI part of the 2014 Southern Regional Meetings in New Orleans.

Dr. David Guidot, his friend and former colleague at Emory University where Roman served prior to his appointment at U of L, presented the award.

The medal is given to academicians based on their accomplishments in education, research and patient care consistent with the mission of the SSCI.

Roman served as president of SSCI in 2009 and remains on its External Advisory Committee. He also currently chairs the Membership and Fund Raising Committees and hosts the Lung Club during the meeting every year.

The SSCI currently boasts 34 members from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine.

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Gift helps Riley 'mow down' cancer

Delegation from Bush Hog, Inc., makes donation at recent Farm Machinery Show in Louisville.
Gift helps Riley 'mow down' cancer

Dr. Elizabeth Riley of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center at the University of Louisville checking out a pink Bush Hog.

Members of the Bush Hog company delegation at the National Farm Machinery Show in Louisville Feb. 11-14 presented $1,000 to the University of Louisville to support the breast cancer research of Dr. Elizabeth Riley and the James Graham Brown Cancer Center.

Riley is an assistant professor of medicine in the U of L Division of Medical Oncology & Hematology, and a breast cancer specialist at the cancer center.

Her research includes examining mastectomy and immediate reconstruction; caring for breast cancer patients who are medically underserved; and novel changes in scheduling radiation treatment following surgery to improve patient outcomes.

The Bush Hog booth at the show also featured a pink Bush Hog to help raise awareness of breast cancer with show participants.

Headquartered in Selma, Ala., Bush Hog Inc. is the leading North American manufacturer of rotary cutters, finishing mowers, landscape tools and tractor-mounted implements used in the agricultural market.

Popham & Gilbert at 100%

Dr. Rebecca Popham

AND

Dr. David Gilbert

have a 100% attendance record at House Staff Council meetings for the 2012-2013 academic year. Academic and clinical responsibilities of the residents sometimes mandate precedence over House Staff Council meetings and Martin Kramer, Program Coordinator of Graduate Medical Education, recognized that this was an extraordinary achievement from our family medicine residency program residents!

GREAT JOB!

It's another boy!!!

Congratulations, to one of our newest Alumnus, Dr. April Halleron! On Friday, July 26th, 2013 at 9:51 a.m., Thomas Vesper Dougherty was born. He weighed in at 8 lbs., 13 oz .and was 22 in. long!

 

2013-14 House Staff Council co-Vice President is...

Our very own Dr. Gilbert was recently voted as the co-VP of the council for the upcoming year! CONGRATULATIONS!!!

Dr. David Gilbert

co-Vice President

House Staff Council, 2013-14

Dr. Gilbert tells Greater Louisville Health Guide

2nd year, David Gilbert tellsGreater Louisville Health Guide 2013-14 why he chose family medicine over any other specialty.

Dr. Amy Kim Selected for Excellence in Graduate Medical Education

Dr. Amy Kim's performance during residency training ranks her among the top family medicine residents in America, says The American Academy of Family Physicians and the Commission on Membership & Member Services (supported by a grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb) salute her achievement. A recognition Breakfast will be held on Friday, September 27 at 7.am. during the AAFP Scientific Assembly in San Diego at the San Diego Marriott Marquis & Marina Hotel. The award includes a round-trip ticket and room accommodations, along with a monetary award of $1,000.

CONGRATS, Dr. Kim! Read her personal statement...

No Longer Sci-Fi! New Technology Saves Baby!

3-D printer helps save dying baby

By Stephanie Smith, CNN updated 5:07 PM EDT, Thu May 23, 2013

Editor's note: "Life's Work" features innovators and pioneers who are making a difference in the world of medicine.

(CNN) -- When he was 6 weeks old, Kaiba Gionfriddo lay flat on a restaurant table, his skin turning blue. He had stopped breathing.

His father, Bryan, was furiously pumping his chest, trying to get air into his son's lungs.

Within 30 minutes, Kaiba was admitted to a local hospital. Doctors concluded that he had probably breathed food or liquid into his lungs and eventually released him.

But two days later, it happened again. Read more...

IT'S A GIRL!!!

Congratulations to Dr. Rebecca Popham on the birth of her baby girl!

 

Emerie Rose Oakman was born on Wednesday, July 27, 2013 at 9:32 p.m. She was 8 lbs., 4 oz..

IT'S A BOY!!!

Congratulations to Dr. Arthi Kaundar on her baby boy! Born on Wednesday, May 22nd, baby Ganesh weighed in at 7lbs. 4oz.

Mom and baby are doing well.

Representation at AAFP National Conference

The AAFP National Conference is a three-day event designed for family medicine residents and medical students. Family medicine leaders and educators conduct special lectures, workshops, procedures courses, and clinics. More than 300 family medicine residency programs are represented in the Exposition Hall. The National Congress of Family Medicine Residents and the National Congress of Student Members hold their annual meetings during the conference. This year, the conference will be held August 1st - August 3rd at Kansas City, MO's, Kansas City Convention Center. More information

UofL Family Medicine Residency Program will send the following representatives:

Dr. Rimy Brar, PGY-2

Dr. Cristina Fernandez, PGY-2

Dr. David Gilbert, PGY-2

Dr. Amy Kim, PGY-2

Dr. Shalonda Newcomb, PGY-1

Dr. Eli Pendleton, Family Medicine

Residency Asst. Program Director

U of L group named as 'Best Doctors in America' for 2014

Doctors picked by consensus peer review.
U of L group named as 'Best Doctors in America' for 2014

A group of doctors from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine were named to the 'Best Doctors in America' list for 2014.


It is no secret in the community that doctors from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine are among the nation's best.

Now, a group of of them are earning well-deserved national recognition as they were selected to the list of Best Doctors in America 2014 by BestDoctors.com.

The Best Doctors in America database is a valued resource that contains the names and professional profiles of approximately 47,000 of the best doctors in the United States.

Only those who earn the consensus support of their peers are included. Doctors cannot buy listings, so, for this reason, inclusion in the Best Doctors in America database is a remarkable honor.

Among those University of Louisville doctors who earned the distinction are:

Based in Boston, Massachusetts, Best Doctors was founded in 1989 by physicians affiliated with the Harvard Medical School to provide expert medical consultation services.

Today, Best Doctors provides its services globally to more than 20 million people, serving large employers, insurance plans, government, and other groups in more than 30 countries.

The organization is privately held with employees and offices in the United States, Canada, UK, Ireland, Spain, Japan, Portugal, and Ecuador, and helps individuals and their treating physicians be absolutely sure they have the right diagnosis and the right treatment.

Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a member's medical condition -- providing value to both patients and treating physicians.

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U of L group named as 'Best Doctors in America' for 2014

Doctors picked by consensus peer review.
U of L group named as 'Best Doctors in America' for 2014

A group of doctors from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine were named to the 'Best Doctors in America' list for 2014.


It is no secret in the community that doctors from the University of Louisville Department of Medicine are among the nation's best.

Now, a group of of them are earning well-deserved national recognition as they were selected to the list of Best Doctors in America 2014 by BestDoctors.com.

The Best Doctors in America database is a valued resource that contains the names and professional profiles of approximately 47,000 of the best doctors in the United States.

Only those who earn the consensus support of their peers are included. Doctors cannot buy listings, so, for this reason, inclusion in the Best Doctors in America database is a remarkable honor.

Among those University of Louisville doctors who earned the distinction are:

Based in Boston, Massachusetts, Best Doctors was founded in 1989 by physicians affiliated with the Harvard Medical School to provide expert medical consultation services.

Today, Best Doctors provides its services globally to more than 20 million people, serving large employers, insurance plans, government, and other groups in more than 30 countries.

The organization is privately held with employees and offices in the United States, Canada, UK, Ireland, Spain, Japan, Portugal, and Ecuador, and helps individuals and their treating physicians be absolutely sure they have the right diagnosis and the right treatment.

Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a member's medical condition -- providing value to both patients and treating physicians.

Bookmark and Share

U of L scientists find simple indicator for cervical cancer

Further clinical study could result in the plasma thermogram as a compliment test to the traditional screening method for cervical cancer.
U of L scientists find simple indicator for cervical cancer

University of Louisville investigators noted that plasma thermograms have different patterns associated with different demographics, as well as for different diseases.


Researchers at the University of Louisville have confirmed that using the heat profile from a person's blood, called a plasma thermogram, can serve as an indicator for the presence or absence of cervical cancer, including the stage of cancer.

The team, led by Nichola Garbett, Ph.D., of the University of Louisville Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, published its findings online Jan. 8 in PLOS ONE ("Detection of Cervical Cancer Biomarker Patterns in Blood Plasma and Urine by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Mass Spectrometry").

"We have been able to demonstrate a more convenient, less intrusive test for detecting and staging cervical cancer," Garbett said. "Additionally, other research has shown that we are able to demonstrate if the current treatment is effective so that clinicians will be able to better tailor care for each patient."

Other team members from the U of L Department of Medicine include Brad Chaires, Ph.D., also of the oncology division, and Michael Merchant, Ph.D., and Jon Klein, M.D., Ph.D., of the Division of Nephrology and Hypertenstion.

To generate a plasma thermogram, a blood plasma sample is “melted” producing a unique signature indicating a person’s health status. This signature represents the major proteins in blood plasma, measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC).

The team demonstrated that the plasma thermogram profile varies when a person has or does not have the disease, and they believe that molecules associated with the presence of disease, called biomarkers, can affect the thermogram of someone with cervical disease. They used mass spectrometry to show that biomarkers associated with cervical cancer existed in the plasma.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

READ THE STUDY

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PFF tabs U of L for new patient registry

Louisville named as one of nine centers for new initiative aimed at aiding pulmonary fibrosis research and treatment.
PFF tabs U of L for new patient registry

The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation selected the University of Louisville as one of nine pilot centers for its new PFF Patient Registry.


The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) in late December announced its plans to establish the PFF Care Center Network (CCN) and the PFF Patient Registry at nine pilot sites, including at the University of Louisville.

Aimed at improving the health and quality of life of patients suffering from pulmonary fibrosis (PF), these initiatives will help provide critical insights enabling the medical research community to develop more effective therapies.

Sites were selected because of their demonstrated commitment to pulmonary fibrosis patient care and research, and their willingness to collaborate in the creation of the PFF Care Center Network.

Besides U of L, those sites include the University of California, San Francisco, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, National Jewish Health, University of Pittsburgh, Vanderbilt University, University of Washington and Yale University.

Dr. Rafael Perez, director of the U of L Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) program in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Disorders Medicine will lead the University of Louisville site.

The ILD program will bring its multidisciplinary core of experts in lung pathology and radiology, pulmonary hypertension, rheumatology, lung transplantation, and research coordinators into the PFF Care Center Network.

Additionally to furthering the mission of outstanding care to individuals with interstitial lung disease, the U of L site will contribute detailed information about interstitial lung diseases through an anonymous patient registry.

"The creation of the registry is a great step forward by the PFF," Dr. Jesse Roman, Chairman of the University of Louisville Department of Medicine said. "The benefits to my patients are that they can contribute to the endeavor and partner with us in identifying new areas for intervention. In short, they become an integral part of their care—they truly are the essence of the network."

Affecting 132,000 to 200,000 individuals in the United States, pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the lung tissue becomes thickened, stiff, and scarred. In most cases, there is no known cause and the disease is called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). There is no cure for IPF, and there is no FDA-approved treatment for IPF in the U.S.

"To make progress with this disease, we need a multidisciplinary approach by teams of expert medical professionals, we need more data, and we need to track the natural history of the disease," Daniel M. Rose, M.D., CEO and Chairman of the Board at the PFF said. "The PFF Care Center Network and Patient Registry will provide these critical cornerstones for improved patient care and progress towards a cure."

The PFF Care Center Network will provide a standardized, multidisciplinary approach to patient care. This model of comprehensive patient care will help identify and establish best practices, determine the impact of specific interventions, and improve the quality of life of patients. The Care Center Network will incrementally expand to eventually include 40 medical centers by 2015.

Meanwhile, the PFF Patient Registry will eventually be the largest database of PF patient records with the furthest demographic reach in the country. It will provide data essential for improving the understanding of the epidemiology, incidence, prevalence, natural history, and other clinical characteristics of PF. The Registry will use consistent data gathering methodology so that the information obtained will be useful to all clinicians and researchers seeking to better understand the disease and develop new therapies for PF.

All the pilot sites of the Care Center Network will participate in the Patient Registry. A principal investigator at each Network site will work with a team of allied health professionals to enroll PF patients into the Registry. The Duke Clinical Research Institute will host and maintain the PFF Patient Registry, and they will oversee the implementation of the Registry.

For more information, please visit www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org or call 888-733-6741.