News

News

Twisted Pink donates $100,000 to UofL’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center

Twisted Pink donates $100,000 to UofL’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center

Twisted Pink presents check to James Graham Brown Cancer Center

Twisted Pink, a charitable foundation dedicated to funding research to prevent and cure metastatic breast cancer, presented a check for $100,000 to the University of Louisville’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center on May 7. The funds will be used to seek improved survival for those diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer. Metastatic breast cancer is cancer that has spread from the breast to another part of the body.

The presentation included, left to right, Haval Shirwan, Ph.D., Nicola Garbett, Ph.D. and Paula Bates, Ph.D. of UofL, Constanze Coon, Ph.D., Lara MacGregor and Caroline Johnson of Twisted Pink, and UofL’s Beth Riley, M.D., Yoannis Imbert-Fernandez, Ph.D., Jason Chesney, M.D., Ph.D. and Brian Clem, Ph.D.

Travis

Travis
Full-size image:297 KB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

Symposium on heart disease in women to showcase healthy lifestyle and stress reduction programs

Symposium on heart disease in women to showcase healthy lifestyle and stress reduction programs

Kendra Grubb, M.D.

Cooking, exercise, acupuncture, yoga and tai chi demos, chair massages and more will help the community learn to reduce stress and improve heart health at the 2015 Louisville Symposium on Heart Disease in Women: Case Studies from the Heart of Louisville on Saturday, May 16.

The symposium is designed to provide the community, physicians, nurses and health professionals up-to-date information on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in women.

The event will be held from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at the Jewish Hospital Rudd Heart & Lung Center, part of KentuckyOne Health, in the Hank Wagner Conference Center, located on the top floor. Registration begins at 7 a.m.

In addition to presentations, case studies and panel discussions from leading experts, attendees can participate in a coping skills training session and learn about basic tenants and food prep for a heart-healthy Mediterranean diet used in the Ornish Program for Reducing Heart Disease.

The event is co-directed by Kendra Grubb, M.D., cardiovascular surgeon with University of Louisville Physicians, director of minimally invasive cardiac surgery for the University of Louisville at Jewish Hospital, and assistant professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, and Lorrel Brown, M.D., a cardiologist with University of Louisville Physicians, associate director of the Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship and assistant professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

“Heart disease can be prevented and, in some cases, even reversed through healthy lifestyle choices focusing on diet, exercise and stress reduction,” said Grubb. “In addition to case studies on treatment, the symposium will have a plethora of opportunities for learning about the latest recommendations and tools for heart disease prevention.”

Many of the wellness demos will be presented by staff from the KentuckyOne Health Healthy Lifestyle Centers, which offer cardiac rehab, medically supervised exercise, nutrition counseling, stress management and more to help individuals get healthy and stay well.

Admission is free to students, residents and fellows and $25 for community members. Continuing medical education credits are available for physicians ($100) and allied health professionals/nurses ($50). Registration is available at: louisvilleheartdiseasewomen.com or call 502.588.7600.


UofL pediatrician part of national study reported in New England Journal of Medicine

Therapeutic hypothermia doesn’t improve results in children who suffer heart attacks
UofL pediatrician part of national study reported in New England Journal of Medicine

Melissa Porter, M.D.

Dropping a child’s body temperature following a heart attack does not appear to improve the child’s chance of surviving or their heart function one year after the heart attack, reports a team of physicians including Melissa B. Porter, M.D., an associate professor in the University of Louisville Department of Pediatrics.

The study is in tomorrow’s edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. Porter was the principal investigator for the Louisville portion of the national clinical trial. The two participants included in the local portion of the study were seen by Porter at Kosair Children’s Hospital, where she serves as a pediatric intensivist.

While therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after such events, there was limited data about this intervention in children. The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, compared data for children who were treated with therapeutic hypothermia with those treated with the existing standard of care. The researchers concluded that therapeutic hypothermia did not offer significant benefit for the children’s survival and functional outcome at one year.

“It was a privilege to work with the team of physicians on this study,” Porter said. “It is gratifying to be a part of such wide-ranging research and to contribute to the improved standard of care for children with serious illnesses and speaks highly of the research practices here at UofL.”

This is the second large-scale, multi-center study involving UofL physicians published in the New England Journal of Medicine this spring, attesting to their increasing status among medical research centers nationwide.

In an earlier study, published March 5, 2015 in the journal, Charles R. Woods, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease specialist and acting chair of the UofL Department of Pediatrics, participated in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Valganciclovir therapy in newborns with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease.

CMV is the leading nongenetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Woods tested patients at Kosair Children’s Hospital over a three-year period, comparing a six-week period of treatment with the drug to six-month treatment. The researchers concluded that treatment with the drug for six months provided modest long-term improvements in hearing and development over the six-week treatment.

“This study of Valganciclovir showed that the drug improves hearing in infants with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection,” Woods said. “This also opens the door for more studies to see if this drug can help a broader group of infants with congenital CMV infection.”

University of Louisville physicians have long been at the forefront of pediatric medicine in Kentucky, providing state-of-the-art patient care at Kosair Children’s Hospital in addition to teaching and conducting research. Participation in studies such as these is an indication that their reputation for quality research is increasing among academic centers across the nation.

“Our contribution to these studies represents UofL’s growing connection and impact at the national level in research that improves health care for children,” Woods said. “UofL Pediatrics faculty members are becoming more widely recognized for quality research and contribution to medical knowledge.”

To read the NEJM articles, go to:

Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1411480

Valganciclovir for Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Disease
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1404599

Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.

Harper was selected as a fellow of the 2015-16 class of Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM).
Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.
Full-size image:99 KB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.

Harper was selected as a fellow of the 2015-16 class of Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM).
Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.
Full-size image:99 KB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., chosen for executive program

UofL department chair and researcher is the 17th member of UofL faculty selected for ELAM
Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., chosen for executive program

Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.

University of Louisville Family and Geriatric Medicine Chair Diane M. Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., has been selected as a member of the 2015-2016 class of the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program. Harper is one of only 54 women in the nation selected for the program.

ELAM is a year-long fellowship for women faculty in schools of medicine, dentistry and public health. The program develops professional and personal skills required for leadership and management in health care. More than 800 ELAM alumnae hold leadership positions in institutions around the world.

Harper was named the Rowntree Endowed Chair and professor in the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine at the UofL School of Medicine in 2013. She is an award-winning clinician, educator and researcher with a background in family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, epidemiology and biostatistics, as well as chemical engineering.

Harper was the U.S. principal investigator who designed the global trials to understand the efficacy of both of the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines to control cervical cancer. She was a lead author in multiple Lancet publications,New England Journal of Medicine and JAMA, and co-author of more than 140 additional articles on cervical cancer prevention. She also has consulted for and published with the World Health Organization on the use of prophylactic HPV vaccines. Harper is a member of the NIH’s Population Sciences and Epidemiology Integrated Review Group of the Epidemiology of Cancer Study Section, as well as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Special Emphasis Panel on HPV Vaccine Impact among Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) and Serosorting and Other Seroadaptive Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in the US.

In ELAM’s 20-year history, 16 faculty members from UofL have completed the fellowship, including UofL School of Medicine Dean, Toni M. Ganzel, M.D., M.B.A., who participated in 2003-2004.

For more information on the ELAM program, visit the program’s website. A complete list of UofL’s ELAM alumnae is included below.

 

The Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine® (ELAM®) Program

University of Louisville Alumnae

 

Lourdes C. Corman, M.D. (1996-1997)

Professor and Vice Chair of Medicine

Chief, Division of Medical Education

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Laura F. Schweitzer, Ph.D. (1998-1999)

Professor, Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology

Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs

Associate Dean of Student Affairs

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Linda F. Lucas, M.D. (1999-2000)

Associate Professor of Anesthesiology

University of Louisville School of Medicine

Director, One Day Surgery

University of Louisville Hospital

 

Barbara J. McLaughlin, Ph.D. (2000-2001)

Professor of Ophthalmology

Associate Dean for Research

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Connie L. Drisko, DDS (2001-2002)

Professor of Periodontics

Assistant Dean for Research

University of Louisville School of Dentistry

 

Susan Galandiuk, M.D. (2001-2002)

Professor of Surgery

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Mary Thoesen Coleman, M.D., Ph.D. (2002-2003)

Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine

Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs, Department of Family and Community Medicine

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Toni M. Ganzel, M.D., M.B.A. (2003-2004)

Interim Dean, School of Medicine

Professor of Surgery, and Otolaryngology

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

V. Faye Jones, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.P.H. (2007-2008)

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Professor of Pediatrics

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Kathy B. Baumgartner, Ph.D. (2008-2009)

Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences

 

Melanie R. Peterson, D.M.D., M.B.A. (2008-2009)

Associate Professor of Dentistry

University of Louisville School of Dentistry

 

Anees B. Chagpar, M.D., M.Sc., M.P.H. (2009-2010)

Academic Advisory Dean, School of Medicine

Director, Multidisciplinary Breast Program

Associate Professor of Surgery

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Jill Suttles, Ph.D. (2010-2011)

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Kelli Bullard Dunn, M.D. (2012-2013)

Professor of Surgery

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Sharmila Makhija, M.D., M.B.A. (2012-2013)

Chair, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health

Donald E. Baxter Endowed Chair in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Professor of Gynecologic Oncology

University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

M. Ann Shaw, M.D. (2013-2014)

Associate Dean for Medical Education

Academic Advisory Dean

Professor of Medicine

University of Louisville School of Medicine

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders created at UofL

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders created at UofL

Dean Toni Ganzel, M.D.

Strengthening the provision of clinical care to patients and education and training to future physicians is an ongoing goal of the University of Louisville School of Medicine. The UofL Board of Trustees approved action in furthering that goal on Thursday (May 14) by establishing the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders, elevating the program from two divisions within the Department of Surgery.

Otolaryngology – also sometimes known as otorhinolaryngology – is the oldest medical specialty in the United States, according to the American Association of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Otolaryngologists are physicians trained in the medical and surgical management and treatment of patients with diseases and disorders of the ear, nose, throat (ENT) and related structures of the head and neck. They are commonly referred to as ENT physicians.

The Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders is one of 23 departments – 18 clinical and five basic science – comprising the School of Medicine. At UofL, board-certified otolaryngologists practice with University of Louisville Physicians-Ear, Nose & Throat.

“Elevating the otolaryngology and communicative disorders divisions to departmental status puts UofL on par with other such programs at medical schools throughout the United States and reflects the growth of the UofL program,” said Toni Ganzel, M.D., dean of the UofL School of Medicine. “It further demonstrates the value of the program to the School of Medicine and the university.”

“Creation of this department will provide the opportunity for continued growth and expansion of the services provided in Otolaryngology and Communicative Disorders,” said Kelly McMasters, M.D., Ph.D., the Ben A. Reid, Sr., M.D. Professor and Chair, Department of Surgery. “By establishing autonomy for this department, UofL will be able to increase the focus on the specific needs of this subspecialty in education, research and clinical care.”

Scientists meet in Louisville to share research that could lead to improved treatments for spinal cord and head injury

Scientists meet in Louisville to share research that could lead to improved treatments for spinal cord and head injury

The second participant to receive an epidural stimulator as part of the investigation of standing, stepping and voluntary control in individuals with complete spinal cord injury.

More than a dozen leading basic scientists from around the nation and the world studying neurological function will make presentations to 160 fellow researchers in Louisville Wednesday and Thursday. The goal is to facilitate collaborations that will advance science leading to improved spinal cord and head injury rehabilitation.

Scientists from Sweden, Canada and the United States will share their latest neurotrauma research at the 21st Annual Kentucky Spinal Cord & Head Injury Research Trust Symposium.

The symposium, sponsored by Kentucky Spinal Cord and Head Injury Research Trust, Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, KentuckyOne Health, Craig H. Neilsen Foundation and University of Louisville School of Medicine, is organized to advance the study of neurotrauma and ultimately lead to methods of restoring function to those with spinal cord and head injuries.

Among those speaking are Abdel El Manira, Ph.D., and Tatiana Deliagina, Ph.D., of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, and Paul Kubes, Ph.D. and Christopher Power, M.D., F.R.C.P.C. of Canada. El Manira will discuss his research into locomotor circuits in zebrafish. His research shows that neuron groups are selectively wired for slow, intermediate or fast movement, and the fish’s nervous system selects distinct motoneurons for different swimming speeds.

Deliagina will discuss her work studying feedback mode of postural control in quadrupeds. Loss of postural control is one of the major motor disorders following spinal cord injury. Marc Freeman, Ph.D. of the University of Massachusetts Medical School will present the keynote address on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of nerve degeneration.

This work is similar to basic science research that led to the groundbreaking clinical studies, done at the University of Louisville and Frazier Rehab Institute, in which stimulators were transplanted into spinal cord injured patients who subsequently gained the ability for volitional movement in their legs (see the patient photo below).

The event will be held May 20-21, 2015 at the Louisville Marriott Downtown, 280 W. Jefferson St. Hours are 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Thursday.

The UofL Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center is dedicated to developing successful spinal cord repair strategies in the laboratory that can be taken to the clinic in a timely and responsible fashion.

Schapmire receives national award for leadership in oncology social work

Tara Schapmire, Ph.D., M.S.S.W., of the University of Louisville’s Interdisciplinary Program for Palliative Care and Chronic Illness, today receives the Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW)/American Cancer Society Leadership in Oncology Social Work Award for 2015. The national award recognizes an AOSW member for contributions to the field of oncology social work and leadership through administration, education, clinical practice or research.
Schapmire receives national award for leadership in oncology social work

Tara Schapmire, Ph.D., M.S.S.W.

 

Schapmire, an assistant professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine and affiliated faculty member at the Kent School of Social Work, will receive the award and give remarks today at the AOSW Conference in Seattle.

Schapmire is co-investigator on a five-year, $1.5 million National Cancer Institute grant to create and evaluate an interdisciplinary oncology palliative care curriculum known as iCOPE (Interdisciplinary Curriculum in Oncology Palliative Care Education). The program is implemented across schools of social work, medicine, nursing and chaplaincy residency programs.

In addition to her work on iCOPE, Schapmire is a co-investigator on the $7.5 Million Kentucky LEADS Collaborative dedicated to reducing the burden of lung cancer in Kentucky through community-based interventions to educate providers and care for survivors, and the prevention and early detection of lung cancer.

As a practicing oncology social worker, Schapmire was responsible for securing grant funds to provide support for all aspects of psychosocial adjustment in all phases of the cancer experience by providing direct financial support, social support and teaching coping skills to patients and their families. She also created a palliative care program, support groups and provided continuing education for hospital employees in these areas.

“Dr. Schapmire’s work affirms UofL’s emphasis at addressing the comprehensive needs of cancer patients and their families through an interdisciplinary approach in treatment and education,” said Donald Miller, M.D., Ph.D., the director of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center.

“My nominators, and the committee who voted for me are all leaders in this field who equally deserve this award.  To be ‘lifted up’ and celebrated by these amazing people is especially meaningful,” Schapmire said.

Paying attention to rising ADHD rates at the next "Beer with a Scientist" program

Find out what’s behind increased diagnoses at “Beer with a Scientist," Wednesday, June 10.
Paying attention to rising ADHD rates at the next "Beer with a Scientist" program

Paul Rosen, Ph.D.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has become one of the most common, controversial and important public health issues in the United States. Rates of ADHD have increased by more than 50 percent in the past 10 years, and the CDC reports that Kentucky has the highest rates of ADHD in the nation.

Is ADHD a real disorder or just a drug company scam? Why are the rates of ADHD going up so quickly, and why are they so high in Kentucky?

Paul Rosen, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at UofL, will address these and other questions in the next “Beer with a Scientist” program:  “Paying attention to increased ADHD rates:  increased prevalence, over diagnosis or a better understanding?”

Rosen is the director of UofL’s Research on ADHD and Children's Emotion Regulation (RACER) Lab, where his research focuses on emotion regulation and dysregulation in children with and without ADHD and emotional and behavioral problems in children with ADHD.

The program begins at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, June 10 at Against the Grain Brewery, 401 E. Main St. A 30-minute presentation will be followed by an informal Q&A session.

The Beer with a Scientist program began in 2014 and is the brainchild of UofL cancer researcher Levi Beverly, Ph.D. Once a month, the public is invited to enjoy exactly what the title promises:  beer and science.

Admission is free. Purchase of beer, other beverages or menu items is not required but is encouraged.

Organizers add that they also encourage Beer with a Scientist patrons to drink responsibly.

For more information and to suggest future Beer with a Scientist topics, follow Louisville Underground Science on Facebook.

UofL physicians, student win 2015 Louisville Medicine essay contests

Mary G. Barry, M.D., editor of Louisville Medicine, announced the winners of the eighth annual Richard Spear, M.D., Memorial Essay Contest during the Greater Louisville Medical Society Presidents’ Celebration on May 31 in the Muhammad Ali Center. The theme of the physician essay contest was “Medicine and the Unexpected” for the practicing/life category and “Using Technology in Medicine Without Becoming a Robot” for the in-training/medical student category.
Nina Vasavada, M.D., was the winner in the practicing/life category for “The Unexpected in Front of Us.” Vasavada is an assistant clinical professor with the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension in the University of Louisville Department of Medicine. She practices with University of Louisville Physicians-Kidney Disease Program.
There was a tie in the in-training/medical student category. Joseph Bales, M.D., was the first of two winners for his piece, “The Machine in All of Us.” Bales will graduate from his residency in UofL’s Department of Emergency Medicine this month and will practice in College Station, Texas, beginning in July.
Sarah Khayat, a third-year medical student at UofL, was the second winner in the in-training/medical student category for her piece, “Hold the Phone.”
Spear was a respected Louisville general surgeon who also served on the faculty of the UofL School of Medicine. When he died in 2007, he left GLMS a bequest to fund the annual essay contest. Spear wished to support high quality writing about the practice of medicine. The winning essays will be published in Louisville Medicine’s July edition.

Spike it to Cancer sand volleyball event benefits cancer center at UofL, June 13

Spike it to Cancer sand volleyball event benefits cancer center at UofL, June 13

Benefactors of a fund to support patients at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center at the University of Louisville are sponsoring their third annual sand volleyball event to raise money for the fund.

In 2013, Alex and Tommy Gift established the Mary Jane Gift Quality of Life Fund at the cancer center, a part of KentuckyOne Health, in honor of their late mother. The fund helps patients and their families enjoy life while facing a cancer diagnosis.

To benefit the fund, the Gifts are sponsoring the Third Annual Spike It to Cancer Sand Volleyball Tournament at Baxter Jack’s sand volleyball complex, 427 Baxter Ave. on Saturday, June 13. Player or spectator admission is $25 per person. Pre-registration is recommended and is now open at the cancer center’s secure online link. Games will begin at 2 p.m. and end by 6 p.m. Registration at the door will be accepted but only from 1-2 p.m.

“All proceeds from this event go to the Mary Jane Gift Quality of Life Fund that pays for extras provided to our patients and caregivers,” Michael Neumann, executive director of development, said. “Additionally, Ward 426 on Baxter Avenue directly across the street from Baxter Jack’s has agreed to donate a portion of all food and beverage sales to us during the event.

"These gifts go a long way in bringing cheer to our patients and their families. For example, the fund has provided Thanksgiving turkeys to many of our patients and their families over the past two years as well as provide picnic baskets to patients on Easter morning.”

For additional details, contact Neumann at 502-562-4642.

 

UofL medicine dean, education chair, professor to be honored

Presentation Academy’s Tower Awards on Oct. 8 will recognize women leaders

The dean of the University of Louisville School of Medicine and a professor and chair in UofL’s College of Education and Human Development will be among the recipients honored with Tower Awards from Presentation Academy of Louisville on Oct. 8 at the Louisville Marriott Downtown, 280 W. Jefferson St.

Now in its 20th year, the Tower Awards is an annual event honoring women leaders in their fields and highlighting the contributions and talents of these role models to Presentation Academy students and the Louisville community. Funds from this event are applied to the academy’s tuition assistance program. Since its inception, the event has raised more than $2 million.

From UofL, Toni Ganzel, M.D., M.B.A., dean of the medical school, will receive the Tower Award in Science and Health Care, and Gaëtane Jean-Marie, Ph.D.,professor and chair of the Department of Educational Leadership, Foundations andHuman Resource Education in UofL’s College of Education and Human Development, will receive the Tower Award in Arts and Communications.

Ganzel was named dean in 2013 and joined UofL in 1983 as an assistant professor in otolaryngology. She served as director of the division of otolaryngology at UofL from 1993 to 2001, when she was named associate dean of student affairs for the School of Medicine. A native of New Mexico, Ganzel earned her bachelor of science and medical degrees from the University of Nebraska. She earned a master’s degree in business administration/medical group management from the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis. She completed her residency in otolaryngology at the University of Nebraska before joining the faculty at the Creighton University School of Medicine. She is a fellow of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program for Women at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, the nation’s only in-depth program for women leaders in academic health care.

Jean-Marie came to UofL as chair and professor in 2013. She was previously a faculty member in educational leadership at the University of Oklahoma and Florida International University. She has a doctorate in educational leadership and cultural studies and post-baccalaureate certificate in women’s studies from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro. A native of Haiti, she obtained her masters’ and bachelor degrees from Rutgers University. Her research focuses on leadership preparation and development in the United States and global context, women and educational leadership and urban school reform through educational equity and social justice. She is co-principal investigator on two industry grants and contracts totaling approximately $1 million funded by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, and U.S. Department of the Army. She also is editor of the Journal of School Leadership and has authored more than 60 publications.

Other Tower Award recipients scheduled to be recognized are Rebecca Matheny, Louisville Downtown Partnership, in the category of Business Technology and Trade; Susan Gatz, Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, in Education; Kathleen Quinn Abernathy, Frontier Communications, in Government and Law; and Maria Price, St. John Center, in Service and Advocacy. The Queen’s Daughters Inc. will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Tickets to the event are $100 per person or $1,000 for table of 10. For more information and to obtain tickets, contact Martha Brown Stephenson at Presentation Academy, 502-583-5935, extension 117, or mstephenson@presentationacademy.org.

Gaetane Jean Marie, Ph.D.

College of Education and Human Development; Tower Award recipient 2015 with SOM Dean Toni Ganzel, M.D.
Gaetane Jean Marie, Ph.D.
Full-size image:2.11 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

Single dose of HPV vaccine may prevent cervical cancer

Study shows one dose could be as effective as the three now recommended
Single dose of HPV vaccine may prevent cervical cancer

Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.

A single dose of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Cervarix appears to be as effective in preventing certain HPV infections as three doses, the currently recommended course of vaccination. That is the conclusion of a study published today in The Lancet Oncology and co-authored by Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., the Rowntree Endowed Chair and professor in the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

In the study, data from two large trials of the vaccine Cervarix were analyzed to compare the effectiveness of one, two or three doses of the vaccine in preventing HPV infection. In the trials, women were randomly chosen to receive three doses of Cervarix or a control vaccine. Although a number of the women received fewer than the three doses, follow-up tests were completed to evaluate the effectiveness of the vaccine in all the women for a period of four years.

The analysis determined the protection from one dose is similar to that achieved by three doses of the vaccine.

"These exciting findings address the fact that nearly two-thirds of people who get HPV vaccines do not get all three doses in a timely manner," said Harper, who was a principal investigator in one of the trials included in the analysis. “Knowing that Cervarix offers protection in one dose reassures public health agencies that they are not wasting money when most of their vaccines are given to those who never complete the three-dose series.”

“Kentucky is one of the states that has not had a program in place to make Cervarix available to all of its citizens, and has very low three-dose completion rates of Gardasil, the other HPV vaccine,” said Harper.

Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women. HPV types 16 and 18 are responsible for about 70 percent of cervical cancers worldwide. These and other types of HPV cause a cancer precursor known as CIN 3.

“From all studies done, we see that Cervarix protects against CIN 3 caused by all HPV types at 93 percent efficacy,” Harper said.

The study is published in The Lancet Oncology with the title, “Efficacy of Fewer than Three Doses of a HPV-16/18 AS04 adjuvanted Vaccine:  a Meta Analysis of Data from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial and the PATRICIA Trial.”

Bumpous named chair of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders

Bumpous named chair of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders

Jeffrey Bumpous, M.D.

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees has named Jeffrey “Jeff” Bumpous, M.D., chair of the newest department in the UofL School of Medicine, the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Disorders. Bumpous was named chair at the board’s meeting on June 4.

The board established the new department at its May 14 meeting by elevating the program from two divisions within the Department of Surgery in a move that strengthens the provision of clinical care to patients and education and training to future physicians as well as audiologists and speech pathologists. At UofL, otolaryngologists practice with University of Louisville Physicians-Ear, Nose and Throat. Communicative disorders professionals practice with UofL Physicians-Hearing & Balance and UofL Physicians-Speech Pathology.

“Dr. Bumpous brings a wealth of educational, clinical and research experience to the department chair’s position,” said Toni Ganzel, M.D., dean of the UofL School of Medicine. “We could have no one better to launch our new department for the benefit of our students, residents and faculty as well as the patients we serve.”

Bumpous is the J. Samuel Bumgardner Professor of Otolaryngologic Surgery and chief of the former Division of Otolaryngology in the Department of Surgery. He has been at UofL since 1994 and leads a multidisciplinary team of health care providers in treating cancers of the head and neck. These include cancers of the mouth, larynx (voice box), pharynx (throat), nasal cavity, sinuses, salivary glands and thyroid gland.

A native of Fort Benning, Ga., Bumpous earned his bachelor’s degree from Morehead State University and his medical degree from UofL. He completed his internship and residency in general surgery, otolaryngology and head and neck surgery at Saint Louis University and a post-graduate fellowship in advanced head and neck and cranial base surgery at the University of Pittsburgh.

Bumpous currently is president of the Society of University Otolaryngologists and a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Otolaryngology. He has served as associate editor of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery and on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Surgery and Laryngoscope. He also has served in leadership roles in the American Academy of Otolaryngology, the American Head and Neck Society, the Kentucky Society of Otolaryngology, the Louisville Otolaryngologic Society and other professional organizations.

Bumpous was named St. Louis University’s 1989 Intern of the Year. During his tenure at UofL, he has won three Vincent J. Hyams resident teaching awards signifying his leadership in mentoring young physicians. He is a 2003 Recipient of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Honor Award. In 2013, he was named Physician of the Year by UofL’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center, a part of KentuckyOne Health. He is board-certified in otolaryngology and is lead or co-author of more than 60 journal articles and scientific book chapters.

Health professionals to train in transgender care

UofL School of Medicine to host sessions for 140 area providers on June 11

Physicians without formal training in transgender health can be unprepared when a transgender patient needs basic health care, or help with a transgender specific issue such as hormonal transition. If the physician is unfamiliar with the typical barriers faced by transgender people in the health-care system or current standards of care, the patient’s health may suffer.

The University of Louisville will host two events on June 11 at the School of Medicine to close this gap by providing physicians and other health-care providers with a better understanding of treatment practices and standard of care for transgender patients.

First, a panel of physicians and community members will discuss best practices in transgender health care in a grand rounds presentation for approximately 80 physicians and other health professionals. Following the panel presentation, about 60 health-care providers and transgender community leaders will meet to network, identify gaps in care and discuss steps needed to improve care for this population.

The events are part of a UofL initiative, known as the eQuality Project,* established to ensure that individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT), gender nonconforming or born with differences of sex development (DSD) receive the best possible health care in the community.

“This is a topic that has been taboo for a long time. Physicians want to provide the best care for these patients, but they may not be aware of issues and how to address someone in a culturally responsive manner,” said Faye Jones, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.P.H., assistant vice president for health affairs -- diversity initiatives at UofL’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion. “This is a group that has many health disparities and this program will help alleviate these disparities.”

People who are LGBT, gender non-conforming or born with DSD often experience challenges when seeking care in doctors’ offices, community clinics, hospitals and emergency rooms. Research shows that these health disparities result in decreased access to care or willingness to seek care, resulting in increased medical morbidity and mortality for LGBT and DSD-affected patients.

“Ultimately, it is our goal to have an identified medical ‘home’ that provides all aspects of care for transgender patients in Louisville, as has been developed in other major clinical centers in the United States,” said Amy Holthouser, M.D., associate dean for medical education at the UofL School of Medicine.

Beginning in August, the UofL School of Medicine will serve as the nation’s pilot site for training future physicians on the unique health-care concerns and issues encountered by LGBT individuals and those who are gender nonconforming or DSD-affected.

The Institute of Medicine, The Joint Commission, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) have all recently highlighted the need for more in-depth provider education on LGBT health.

“At least forty hours of content in the UofL school of medicine curriculum have been targeted for revision to be more inclusive and affirming of LGBT and DSD patients,” Holthouser said. “This will reinforce the core stance that a competent physician is skilled in the care of all patients within their community and can approach each patient with sensitivity, compassion and the knowledge necessary to promote health and wellness.”

For more information about attending the event on June 11, contact Stacie Steinbock, director of the LGBT Center Satellite Office on the Health Sciences Center Campus at Stacie.steinbock@louisville.edu.

 

*About the eQuality Project:  The eQuality Project at UofL is an interdisciplinary initiative that includes the School of Medicine’s Undergraduate Medical Education Office, the Health Sciences Center’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and the UofL LGBT Center. The purpose of the eQuality Project is to deliver equitable quality care for all people, regardless of identity, development or expression of gender/sex/sexuality.

Conference to examine multidisciplinary approach to treating metastatic brain and spinal cancer

UofL James Graham Brown Center hosts meeting July 10 open to providers and public

Experts from around the country will join faculty experts from the University of Louisville’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center, a part of KentuckyOne Health, to look at the latest evidence-based medicine in treating metastatic cancer of the central nervous system.

“Evaluation and Management of Patients with Brain and Spinal Metastasis” will be held July 10 from 7:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the UofL Clinical and Translational Research Building, 505 S. Hancock St. Admission is free but pre-registration is strongly encouraged at the conference website.

“We are bringing together some of the leading clinicians and researchers from our cancer center and beyond to discuss the latest innovations in caring for patients with central nervous system cancer,” said Conference Director Eric Burton, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Neurology. “Disciplines represented include neurosurgery, radiation oncology, neuroradiology, neuro-oncology and more.”

The conference is designed both for health care providers and the general public, Burton said. “If you are a health care professional working in the neurological cancer field, if you are a patient with neurological cancer or if you are a caregiver to someone with neurological cancer, this conference will benefit you.”

In addition to Burton, presenters include:

 

  • Donald Miller, M.D., Ph.D., director, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, and James Graham Brown Foundation Chair, UofL
  • Michael Glantz, M.D., professor of neurosurgery, medicine and neurology, Penn State University
  • Roy Patchell, M.D., neurologist, Capital Health Medical Center-Hopewell and Capital Institute for Neurosciences, Pennington, N.J.
  • Warren Boling, M.D., interim chair and professor, Department of Neurological Surgery, UofL
  • Vinai Gondi, M.D., clinical assistant professor, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center and Radiation Oncology Consultants, Chicago
  • Maxwell Boakye, M.D., associate professor and the Ole A., Mabel Wise and Wilma Wise Nelson Chair in Clinical Geriatrics Research, UofL Department of Neurological Surgery
  • Shaio Woo, M.D., chair and professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the Kosair Children’s Hospital/Norton Healthcare Chair in Pediatric Oncology, UofL
  •  

    Continuing education credit is available to health care providers. For additional information, visit the conference website or contact Emily Rollins in the UofL Department of Neurological Surgery at emily.rollins@louisvilleneuroscience.com.

    UofL Physicians launches interactive game to raise awareness of academic medicine

    UofL Physicians launches interactive game to raise awareness of academic medicine

    University of Louisville Physicians today launched the “Academic Physician Precision Challenge,” a fun, interactive game to raise awareness of academic medicine.

    Every day, doctors make discoveries and develop innovative treatments that change the lives of patients and their families everywhere. Most of these breakthroughs are made by academic physicians, dedicated doctors who see patients in clinical practices while researching and teaching at universities like the University of Louisville. Because of their academic affiliation and research activities, they have the opportunity to take the latest in clinical research and apply it for real-world use. They also often help shape health policy, sitting on government and professional panels.

    The Precision Challenge measures anatomical knowledge while giving users insight into how academic doctors may have contributed to their health, or that of their family or friends.

    “The game is designed as a unique way to grow awareness of the groundbreaking contributions academic physicians have made in the field of medicine, and why people would want to choose an academic physician for their health care,” said Diane Partridge, vice president of Marketing and Communications for UofL Physicians.

    The game, designed by Louisville-based DBS>Interactive, invites users to test their knowledge of anatomy by placing 11 organs, such as the pancreas and liver, in the correct spot. If the user is precise, a box appears presenting them with a medical advancement or discovery relating to that organ made by an academic physician. If they aren’t, the user hears a buzzer and the screen shakes, and they have to try again.

    When all the parts are placed, the user gets a ranking, with a corresponding badge based on their number of errors:

    • Medical doctor
    • Medical resident
    • In med school
    • Pre-med
    • High school biology

    The game will be shared with teachers and schools across the U.S.

    Find the game here at www.uoflphysicians.com/academic-precision-challenge

    Five from UofL presenting at National Neurotrauma Society symposium

    Five from UofL presenting at National Neurotrauma Society symposium

    Scott Whittemore, Ph.D.

    Three faculty members holding endowed positions, an associate professor and an instructor from the University of Louisville Department of Neurological Surgery will share their expertise this summer at the annual meeting of one of the nation’s premiere organizations of brain and spinal cord injury specialists and researchers.

    Neurotrauma 2015, the 33rd Annual Symposium of the National Neurotrauma Society, will be held in Santa Fe, N.M., June 28-July 1. The annual symposium is considered the primary scientific forum for exchanging information in the fields of both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI).

    On Sunday, June 28, assistant professor Enrico Rejc, Ph.D., will present Lumbrosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing After Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans. At UofL, Rejc investigates the effects of different combinations of stimulation parameters, weight-bearing related sensory information and training on the modulation of the spinal neural networks, with the intent to promote the recovery of motor function for standing.

    On Monday, June 29, Scott Whittemore, Ph.D., will chair the presentation on Genetic Dissection of Locomotor Circuitry. Speaking during the presentation will be David Magnuson, Ph.D., on Conditional Silencing Propriospinal Neurons: Hopping to a New Tune.

    Whittemore is the Dr. Henry D. Garretson Chair in Spinal Cord and Head Injury Research and the scientific director of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, considered one of the largest such centers in the nation. Magnuson is the Friends for Michael Endowed Chair in Spinal Cord Injury Research and also serves on the Symposium Program Committee organizing the 2015 event.

    On Wednesday, July 1, Michal Hetman, M.D., Ph.D., will chair and Whittemore will co-chair the presentation, Cell Death is Still Alive, a look at the effect of cell death on TBI and SCI. Hetman is the Endowed Professor of Molecular Signaling and his research is concentrated on identification of the molecules controlling neural cell survival and  growth. Instructor Sujata Saraswat-Ohri, Ph.D., will present one of the three sessions of the presentation, Targeting the Homeostatic Arm of the ER Stress Pathway Improves Functional Recovery After SCI.

    “The Neurotrauma Annual Symposium has informative discovery, translational and clinical sessions and workshops, as well as programs for students and early career investigators,” Whittemore said. “We are proud to bring the accomplishments of the University of Louisville into this discussion of the latest research and evidence-based medicine with our peers from throughout the country.”

    Research to Prevent Blindness awards RPB Stein Innovation Award to UofL researcher

    Research to Prevent Blindness awards RPB Stein Innovation Award to UofL researcher

    Douglas Dean, Ph.D.

    Douglas Dean, Ph.D., the Robert W. Rounsavall Jr. and Gretchen C. Rounsavall Endowed Chair in Ocular Molecular Biology in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Louisville, has been awarded the 2015 RPB Stein Innovation Award from Research to Prevent Blindness.

    The award is $300,000 over three years and provides funding to scientists actively engaged in research that investigates the visual system and the diseases that compromise its function. Dean is one of seven researchers at six institutions who have received the award since it was established in 2014.

    “We are most grateful for the research support provided by Research to Prevent Blindness,” said Henry J. Kaplan, Evans Professor of Ophthalmology and chair of UofL’s Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. “Dr. Dean and his collaborators have recently made very important observations concerning the rescue of cone photoreceptors in retinitis pigmentosa, the leading form of hereditary retinal degeneration in the United States. His demonstration that cone photoreceptor demise in this disease appears related to ‘glucose starvation’ may have enormous translational impact.”

    Dean’s research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health. He has published more than 150 articles in peer-reviewed journals including Cell, Molecular Cell, Nature and Genes & Development.

    Prior to coming to UofL in 2004, Dean served on the faculty in the departments of Cell Biology and Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. He completed a three-year fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He then completed a second postdoctoral fellowship at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, Calif.

    Research to Prevent Blindness is the world’s leading voluntary organization supporting eye research. Since it was founded in 1960, RPB has channeled hundreds of millions of dollars to medical institutions for research into the causes, treatment and prevention of blinding eye diseases. For information on RPB, RPB-funded research, eye disorders and the RPB Grants Program, go to www.rpbusa.org.

    Cancer immunotherapy to be discussed at next "Beer with a Scientist" event

    Can we teach our own immune cells to kill cancer? Jason Chesney, M.D., Ph.D. of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center will discuss recent research at the next “Beer with a Scientist” program July 15
    Cancer immunotherapy to be discussed at next "Beer with a Scientist" event

    Jason Chesney, M.D., Ph.D.

    One of the most promising areas of research in the fight against cancer is immunotherapy, or stimulating the body’s own immune system to destroy cancer. Jason Chesney, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the University of Louisville Department of Medicine and the deputy director of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, is conducting clinical trials using checkpoint inhibitors as well as modified herpes virus in the treatment of melanoma with impressive results.

    Chesney will speak at the next “Beer with a Scientist” event about immunotherapy research being conducted at UofL and elsewhere and treatments that may be available in the next few years.

    “We finally understand how to activate the human immune system to clear cancer cells, having developed new classes of immunotherapies that dramatically improve the survival of cancer patients,” Chesney said.

    The program begins at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, July 15 at Against the Grain Brewery, 401 E. Main St. A 30-minute presentation will be followed by an informal Q&A session.

    The Beer with a Scientist program began in 2014 and is the brainchild of UofL cancer researcher Levi Beverly, Ph.D. Once a month, the public is invited to enjoy exactly what the title promises:  beer and science.

    Admission is free. Purchase of beer, other beverages or menu items is not required but is encouraged.

    Organizers add that they also encourage Beer with a Scientist patrons to drink responsibly.

    For more information and to suggest future Beer with a Scientist topics, follow Louisville Underground Science on Facebook.

    UofL, AARP host free aging conference ‘Watch Party’ on July 13

    Public, professionals invited to live-streamed 2015 White House Conference on Aging
    UofL, AARP host free aging conference ‘Watch Party’ on July 13

    The University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging and AARP will host a free “Watch Party” of the 2015 White House Conference on Aging, Monday, July 13. Registration opens at 9 a.m. and the conference will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    The conference is open to the general public as well as to professionals engaged in all aspects of senior caregiving and service provision. Space is limited, so RSVPs are needed by contacting Ann Burke at optimalaging@louisville.edu or 502-852-5629. For additional information, contact Mary Romelfanger, associate director of the Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging, mary.romelfanger@louisville.edu.

    The conference will be live-streamed in the recently renovated Lecture Hall, room B215 of the UofL School of Medicine Instructional Building, 500 S. Preston St. Metered parking is available on South Preston, East Muhammed Ali and East Chestnut streets and parking for a fee is available in the Chestnut Street Garage, 414 E. Chestnut St.

    President Barack Obama is scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the White House Conference on Aging, an event held once a decade since 1961 that helps chart the course of aging policy. Watch Party attendees will be able to send questions and comments directly to the conference and a panel of local aging specialists will be available to answer questions at the event.

    “The year 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security,” said Anna Faul, D.Litt., Executive Director of the Institute for Sustainable Health and Optimal Aging. “The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.”

    According to the conference website, the four areas the conference will examine were developed after hearing from older Americans in forums held across the country. The common themes that emerged from this input were the following:

    • Retirement security is a vitally important issue to older Americans. Financial security in retirement provides essential peace of mind for older Americans, but requires attention during their working lives to ensure that they are well prepared for retirement.
    • Healthy aging will be all the more important as baby boomers age. As medicine advances, the opportunities for older Americans to maintain their health and vitality should progress as well, and support from their communities, including housing, are important tools to promote their vitality.
    • Long-term services and supports remain a priority. Older Americans overwhelmingly prefer to remain independent in the community as they age. They need supports to do so, including a caregiving network and well-supported workforce.
    • Elder justice is important given that seniors, particularly the oldest older Americans, can be vulnerable to financial exploitation, abuse and neglect. The Elder Justice Act was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act, and its vision of protecting seniors from scam artists and others seeking to take advantage of them must be realized.

    Better Breathers Club to discuss nutrition, lung disease

    Monthly support group offers information for people with chronic lung conditions
    Better Breathers Club to discuss nutrition, lung disease

    “Nutrition and Lung Disease” will be the topic when the University of Louisville Better Breathers Club next meets from 2-4 p.m., Thursday, July 9. The free support group is open to the public and meets in room 120 of the UofL Physicians Outpatient Center, 401 E. Chestnut St.

    Metered parking is available on East Chestnut and parking for a fee is available in the Chestnut Street Garage at 414 E. Chestnut Street, directly across the street from the outpatient center.

    Participants will discuss the role diet plays in management of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, chronic bronchitis and others. UofL staff will be on hand to answer questions and provide information.

    Better Breathers Clubs are an initiative of the American Lung Association, giving people with lung disease, their caregivers and loved ones support, education and information. At UofL, the Better Breathers Club is sponsored by the American Lung Association, UofL Physicians-Pulmonology and the UofL School of Medicine.

    For information, contact the UofL Better Breathers Club at 502-852-1917.

     

    UofL medical student selected for Universal Notes student editorial panel

    Andrew Smith will help improve app designed to assist students with licensure exams

    University of Louisville medical student Andrew Smith has been selected as a member of the 2015-2016 Student Editorial Panel for Universal Notes, a subscription-based web application that assists students in preparation for Step 1, 2 and 3 exams as well as the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) assessments. Smith is one of 10 students selected from medical schools in the United States and abroad to serve on the panel for one year beginning this month.

    Smith, a third-year student in the School of Medicine, responded to a call for applicants who are interested in learning about medical education.

    “It sounded like a great opportunity because I hope to teach medicine. One of the things we get to do is write questions for the Q-bank, so I hope it will improve my question writing. Also, I will be studying as I am updating the questions, so it will improve is my knowledge base,” Smith said.

    Universal Notes was developed by Aaron McGuffin, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, as a tool for assisting medical students prepare for the exams they must pass on their way to becoming physicians. McGuffin created the student editorial panel to critique the material and to serve as a training ground for medical educators of the future.

    “Students are the lifeblood of the success of Universal Notes,” McGuffin said. “One job of the panel is to use it and evaluate it and say how it could be better. The other thing is we put them in the role of teacher so they have to look at the curriculum as if they are teaching it. That gives them a respect for the challenges of preparing information for delivery. My hope for these student editors is they eventually want to be academic clinicians.”

    Students were selected for the editorial panel based on their demonstrated desire to teach. Smith has been involved in teaching his fellow students at UofL both as an undergraduate and in medical school, tutoring students in chemistry and anatomy and teaching sections of the prematriculation program, which helps medical students get a head start on the curriculum for the following year of study.

    “Andrew was one of the best student instructors I have had in the prematriculation program. He went above and beyond in preparing and presenting the lectures. He even hosted evening and weekend review sessions and created a practice practical lab exam for the students,” said Mary Joshua, UofL’s director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and prematriculation program coordinator. “He has a real passion for sharing his knowledge with other people.”

    Smith already has begun evaluating the material in Universal Notes and developing questions.

    “It needs more information, but that’s what we are here to do,” Smith said. “It is pretty exciting. I do love this kind of thing.”

    About Universal Notes:  Universal Notes is a comprehensive online study and assessment tool for medical students, helping them prepare for Step 1, Step 2, Step 3 and NBME. A companion app is available for Android and iOS devices. Universal Notes is compiled and edited by medical students and educators. The database contains information on basic sciences, drugs, diseases, labs, competencies and board review questions.

    Childhood cancer vaccine photo1

    Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Ph.D., processes vaccine in the cell therapy lab.
    Childhood cancer vaccine photo1
    Full-size image:7.67 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Childhood cancer vaccine photo2

    Kenneth Lucas, M.D., works in the cell therapy lab [horizontal]
    Childhood cancer vaccine photo2
    Full-size image:7.72 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Childhood cancer vaccine photo3

    Kenneth Lucas, M.D., works in the cell therapy lab [vertical]
    Childhood cancer vaccine photo3
    Full-size image:8.59 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Childhood cancer vaccine photo4

    Kenneth Lucas, M.D., prepares Tyler Foster for the vaccine.
    Childhood cancer vaccine photo4
    Full-size image:8.31 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Childhood cancer vaccine photo5

    Nurse Jenn Comings checks the chemo line for Zach Hartwell
    Childhood cancer vaccine photo5
    Full-size image:9.00 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Childhood cancer vaccine photo6

    Kenneth Lucas, M.D., right, listens to Sam Rosebrock's heart after he receives the vaccine as his mother Danielle holds him
    Childhood cancer vaccine photo6
    Full-size image:8.82 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Childhood cancer vaccine photo7

    Tyler Foster is injected with the cancer vaccine
    Childhood cancer vaccine photo7
    Full-size image:5.82 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    UofL physicians conducting vaccine trial for children with relapsed tumors at Kosair Children’s Hospital

    UofL physicians conducting vaccine trial for children with relapsed tumors at Kosair Children’s Hospital

    Kenneth Lucas, M.D., injects Tyler Foster with a cancer vaccine made from Tyler's own cells.

    Zach feels “pretty good.” Sam wants to be “done with shots!” And Tyler finds it helps to “just keep thinking that at least I’m getting out of school.”

    They are normal boys who had normal lives until cancer came into the picture. All have faced the disease for two years or more, with surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. All were diagnosed with various malignant solid tumors, went into remission and then relapsed.

    Today, however, they and their parents are finding hope in a Phase I research study led by Kenneth G. Lucas, M.D., chief of the division of pediatric hematology/oncology and stem cell transplantation at the University of Louisville. Leading a team of his colleagues at Kosair Children’s Hospital and in the UofL Department of Pediatrics, Lucas is making progress in developing a vaccine that one day could possibly prevent recurrence of some childhood cancers.

    Lucas began the trial – the only one of its kind – while on the faculty of Penn State in 2011. Coming to Louisville in 2012, he now has three patients enrolled in the trial. Another 13 have previously completed the regimen. He uses the patient’s own blood cells in developing the vaccine.

    “The vaccine is designed to stimulate the patient’s immune system to attack specific tumor proteins, and then fight the tumor,” said Lucas, who also is the chief of pediatric hematology/oncology at Kosair Children’s Hospital.

    The vaccine is prepared and frozen in a cell therapy lab and then thawed for injection. Patients come to UofL’s Kosair Charities Pediatric Clinical Research Unit for a week of chemotherapy that helps make the tumor cells express these cancer proteins. These proteins enable the tumors to be killed by immune cells that are stimulated by the vaccine.

    The following two weeks are devoted to vaccination, followed by another two weeks of observation for side effects to the vaccine. The process is repeated four times, making the treatment take anywhere from four to five months. Thus far, the vaccine has been well tolerated by most patients, Lucas said.

    Patients may be referred by their own physician or can self-refer, Lucas said. Anyone interested in the trial should contact KCPCRU@louisville.edu or 502-629-5820.

    The trial is partially funded by the Children’s Hospital Foundation and raiseRED, a dance marathon fundraising effort organized by UofL students to support pediatric cancer research.

    Sam Rosebrock, age 5, Morganton, N.C.

    Like any 5-year-old, Sam Rosebrock of Morganton, N.C., is anxious prior to his injection.

    “I don’t want a shot,” he repeatedly said amid tears as mom Denielle Rosebrock comforted him. After the injection, he asked her, “Are we done with our shots?” Hearing that there would be no more injections, he was happy to repeat, “Done with shots! Done with shots!”

    Sam had neuroblastoma, a type of cancer most commonly found in young children that develops from immature nerve cells found in several areas of the body. Sam’s neuroblastoma was originally diagnosed in 2012 in the adrenal glands. Following chemotherapy, surgery, radiation, stem cell transplantation and antibody immunotherapy, he went into remission.

    The cancer later came back in the groin area and left testicle. More chemo and immunotherapy followed, putting Sam into remission again. Sam’s oncologist in Charlotte, N.C., learned about the trial in Louisville and Denielle said it was easy to make the decision to enroll him.

    “With neuroblastoma, even when you have no evidence of disease, the likelihood of it coming back is extremely high,” said Denielle, who with her husband, Mark, has another son, Isiah, age 10. “When you relapse, you have to do something.”

    Zach Hartwell, age 20, Lyndonville, Vt.

    Doing “something” also is uppermost in the mind of Bill Hartwell, father of 20-year-old Zach who was diagnosed in 2011 with a medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor found in children and occurring in the cerebellum, which is the part of brain located at the base of the skull, just above the brainstem. Bill, wife Nancy and Zach have been on a four-state odyssey since diagnosis, from their home in Lyndonville, Vt., to Dartmouth, N.H., where the diagnosis was confirmed, to treatment in Boston and now to Louisville.

    Along the way, Zach had surgeries, chemotherapy, radiation and more. He also experienced posterior fossa syndrome, a condition that affected his ability to move and speak.

    Through a Facebook group, Parents of Kids with Medulloblastoma, Nancy learned about the experimental therapy.

    “At 8 o’clock on a Saturday night, Nancy is checking Facebook and she saw information about Dr. Lucas and his trial, so she emailed him,” Bill said. “At 10 o’clock, he returns the email – it was just that quick – and says he thinks Zach may be eligible.”

    Zach is the first patient in the trial with medulloblastoma. He receives a similar round of treatment as Sam: First week of chemotherapy, second and third weeks for vaccination, and fourth and fifth weeks for observation.

    In speech halted by posterior fossa syndrome but still clear, Zach said, “I knew I was going to have to do something – chemo or radiation or both – and this just seemed like it was the better option.”

    “To us, this treatment seems like a very logical thing to do, a very logical approach. And much less invasive than the other treatments he has had,” Bill said.

    Tyler Foster, age 14, Beechmont, Ky.

    The fact that the vaccine therapy is less invasive is a plus for Tyler Foster’s dad, Michael Foster of Beechmont, Ky.

    “This is a lot milder than any other treatment he has had,” Michael said.  “I believe this has been the easiest treatment he has faced.”

    Tyler is 14 and was originally diagnosed with osteogenic sarcoma in 2013 in his right knee, femur and lung. It also is known as osteosarcoma and is a type of bone cancer. It often starts in the ends of the bones where new bone tissue forms as a young person grows.

    After chemotherapy and surgeries, Tyler went into remission at Christmastime in 2013. In September 2014, the cancer came back, followed by more surgeries, including removing all of his femur and hip. He then underwent a rigorous chemotherapy regimen known as “ICE” – a three-drug combination of ifosamide, carboplatin and etoposide.

    “It’s hard enough to hear your child has cancer. That’s a blow out of this world,” said Michael, who with wife Susan has another child, Alexis, age 20. “And then to hear it a second time is even harder.

    “ICE was hard, very, very hard. We almost lost Tyler a couple of times. He had feeding tubes. He was vomiting. He vomited up around 17 liters (of fluid) in one day.

    “So that was a pretty rocky road. But he got better and had radiation after that.”

    Tyler speaks with the wisdom of a teenager who tests above his grade level but still is … well, a teenager.

    “When I heard I had cancer, my first thought was that I was going to get out of school for awhile,” he said with a laugh.

    The journey since, however, has the ginger-haired teen philosophical. “I just really have tried to not think too much about what was happening,” he said, “and just look towards the future, that one day, I can get over this.”

    Hope for the future

    That focus on the future is what keeps Bill Hartwell going, too. “We feel like this treatment is going to be the cure. People always talk about statistics, but we don’t even think about that kind of stuff.

    “We saw this trial, the treatment seemed to make good sense, and so we think … this is going to cure Zach, and we’re going to move forward from there.”

    Denielle Rosebrock has hope as well. “We don’t get ‘definites’ (definitive answers) because it is a trial and it’s very new,” she said. “We also know that participating in the trial is one of our choices. We have to do something to prevent the cancer from coming back. We know there is a lot of promise in it.”

    “If this works, man, it would be terrific for other kids that face this,” said Michael Foster. Adds Tyler: “It helps me to know that if this does work, it wouldn’t put other kids through the same thing I’ve been through.”

    HD digital video accompanying this story is available at https://youtu.be/jvUks4uwl9U. Print-quality still photos can be found at http://louisville.edu/medicine/news/photos-childhood-cancer-vaccine-research-at-uofl-kosair-childrens-hospital-1. Video and still photography furnished byKosair Children’s Hospital.

    Bolli recognized for lifetime of achievement by international research society

    Bolli recognized for lifetime of achievement by international research society

    Roberto Bolli, M.D.

    The International Society for Heart Research (ISHR) has honored University of Louisville’s Roberto Bolli, M.D. for his contributions to cardiovascular science. The Peter Harris Distinguished Scientist Award, which recognizes a senior investigator for lifetime contributions of major discoveries in cardiovascular science, was presented to Bolli at the organization’s European Section meeting in Bordeaux, France earlier in July.

    “This award is significant because it comes from an international community. I was chosen not by people I work more closely with in the United States, but by people from all over the world. It is truly an international recognition,” said Bolli, chief of UofL’s Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, director of the Institute of Molecular Cardiology and director of the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute, as well as vice chair for research in the Department of Medicine.

    The Peter Harris Distinguished Scientist Award is the most prestigious award presented by the ISHR, an international organization devoted to the discovery and dissemination of knowledge in the cardiovascular sciences on a world-wide basis. The ISHR’s 3,000 members are affiliated with seven sections based on five continents.

    As recipient of the 2015 award, Bolli received a $3,000 honorarium and presented a keynote lecture at the meeting on July 2 on the state of cell-based therapies for ischemic cardiomyopathy. His research is focused on the use of stem cells to treat patients with coronary artery disease. Bolli led the Louisville-based SCIPIO trial that pioneered treatment with a patient’s own heart stem cells to regenerate dead heart muscle. Larger studies are underway which could lead to widespread use of this treatment.

    “Smaller studies, including what we did in Louisville, have shown promise and the data are encouraging. We are awaiting final demonstration that the cells are truly beneficial in patients,” Bolli said.

    Bolli also has conducted research on preventing damage caused during heart attacks by studying ischemic preconditioning, the phenomenon in which heart muscle exposed to brief periods of stress becomes resistant to the tissue death that might be caused by a heart attack.

    Three siblings pursue dreams at UofL School of Medicine

    Youngest member of the Eid family joins her brothers in medical school at white coat ceremony July 26
    Three siblings pursue dreams at UofL School of Medicine

    Eid family - Ryan, Nemr, Sabine, Nada and Mark

    When Nemr Eid, M.D., joined the staff at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in 1988, he could not have guessed that his children would ultimately attend medical school there – all at the same time. As of July 26, when Eid’s youngest child, Sabine, received her white coat and formally became a medical student, all three children of Eid and his wife, Nada, are students in the UofL School of Medicine.

    “When I think about it, it fills my heart with joy and with pride,” said Eid, chief of UofL’s division of pediatric pulmonology. “And to have them in the same medical school with me is even more joyful.”

    At the White Coat Ceremony, held on July 26 at the Downtown Marriott (280 W. Jefferson), the UofL School of Medicine faculty and medical community members formally welcomed first-year medical students by presenting them with a white coat. The coats, a gift from the Greater Louisville Medical Society, are shorter than the physicians’ coats, and are worn until the student graduates from medical school. Once they received their coats, members of the incoming class recited the Declaration of Geneva, promising to serve humanity and honor the traditions of the medical profession.

    Eid never assumed his children would follow in his footsteps. He encouraged them to pursue their own paths.

    “We would sit at the dinner table and talk about what you want to be. I did not discourage them. I did not say ‘you should not be a doctor.’ But I never encouraged them, either,” Eid said. “I would tell them to ‘follow your dream; do whatever makes you happy.’ I never thought all three of them would go into medicine!”

    Eid’s three children, Mark, Ryan and Sabine, each decided on a career in medicine via different routes. The eldest, Mark, originally set his sights on a career in economics or law. Sabine considered a career in broadcast communications. Only the middle child, Ryan, always knew he wanted to be a physician.

    “I knew I would go into medicine since the third grade. Science was one of my passions,” Ryan said. “I also have always been interested in cultures and people and the world and travel. That took me to the University of Miami in Florida. It is the most diverse school in the country, so I have friends in China, the Cayman Islands, Europe and Africa.”

    Mark enrolled as an undergraduate at UofL with a law degree in mind.

    “I was a political science and economics major for my first two and a half years of college,” Mark said. However, he realized he missed science and appreciated his father’s relationships with his patients. So he backtracked to catch up on undergraduate science courses in preparation for medical school.

    In 2013, both Mark and Ryan enrolled at UofL School of Medicine as members of the class of 2017.

    Having also decided on a career in medicine, Sabine received her bachelor’s degree from UofL this spring with a major in biology, and will formally join her brothers in medical school as a member of the Class of 2019.

    “I had the privilege of working with Dr. Nemr Eid on mutual patients with pediatric airway problems for many years. It has been such a treat to have his sons, Mark and Ryan, as medical students at UofL. Their strong intellect, commitment and altruistic spirit certainly came as no surprise,” said Toni Ganzel, dean of the UofL School of Medicine. “I’m delighted to see the Eid legacy continue at UofL and look forward to working with Sabine as she begins her medical school journey.”

    Although they had individual mentors outside the family, each of the Eid children say their father inspired them to enter medicine through his attitude toward his work.

    “He gets up every single morning and goes to work happy,” Sabine said. “He comes home every single evening happy. He loves what he does. He has never said anything negative. Hopefully, in the chapter I choose, I will wake up every morning and feel excited to go to work.”

    They also credit their mother, Nada, for encouragement and support.

    “She is a lawyer so she knows exactly what a rigorous curriculum is like. My mom has been there to help us through the tasks at hand from grade school and college and now med school,” Ryan said.

    “Each of them has had a different journey that brought them to this day,” Dr. Eid said. “Each will have a different path that will propel them to their dream. It is up to them to follow that dream.”

     

    About Pediatric Pulmonology – During his first ten years at UofL, Nemr Eid, M.D., was the only pediatric pulmonologist in Louisville. Although other physicians in his specialty now have joined him, a critical need for these physicians remains throughout the nation and in Kentucky, where there is only one pediatric pulmonologist for every 170,000 children. Under Eid’s direction, UofL began a pediatric pulmonology fellowship two years ago, but he hopes more physicians will pursue the specialty since those positions are not always filled.

    UofL diabetes and obesity researcher to chair NIH study section

    Bhatnagar will lead group in evaluating grant requests in cardiovascular science
    UofL diabetes and obesity researcher to chair NIH study section

    Aruni Bhatnagar, Ph.D.

     

    For the next two years, Aruni Bhatnagar, Ph.D., will have significant influence over the funding of certain types of scientific research as he leads a panel that considers grant applications to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Bhatnagar, the Smith and Lucille Gibson Chair in Medicine at the University of Louisville, will serve as chair of the 15-member Clinical and Integrative Cardiovascular Science Study Section, a part of the Center for Scientific Review (CSR) that evaluates grant requests for patient-oriented research involving the cardiovascular system and related regulatory organ systems.

    Bhatnagar is the director of the UofL Diabetes and Obesity Center, where he leads a group of 30 investigators focused on developing a better understanding of the cardiovascular complications of diabetes. His research focuses on the mechanisms by which oxidative stress affects cardiovascular function.

    “Aruni Bhatnagar’s recognition by the NIH reflects the quality of research at the University of Louisville. Having him participate as the chair of this NIH study section elevates our programs even further on the national scale and emphasizes the importance of his work in the larger scientific community,” said David L. Dunn, M.D., Ph.D., executive vice president for health affairs at UofL.

    Members of the CSR study sections are selected based on their achievements in their scientific disciplines, demonstrated by their research accomplishments, publications and other activities. The study section chair is in place for a two-year term. Bhatnagar’s term began July 1, 2015 and runs through June 2017.

    Bhatnagar says serving as a study section chair is both an honor and a responsibility.

    “Being appointed as a chair of a study section is a clear recognition of the leadership role of a scientist, both in conducting research as well as in contributing to the discussion of specific research ideas and projects,” Bhatnagar said. “With a diminishing NIH budget, it is becoming increasingly important that only the best science is funded and that the new, untested ideas that have high potential are not subsumed by a process that favors the status quo and is reluctant to support innovative research.”

    UofL researchers propose new concept on how brain interprets visual information

    UofL researchers propose new concept on how brain interprets visual information

    Martha Bickford, Ph.D.

    One of the many functions of the brain is to collect and process visual information so that people know how to respond to the movement of objects around them. A study published in July in The Journal of Neuroscience by researchers at the University of Louisville provides a new concept for how the brain functions to achieve this.

    “Looking at the visual pathways of the brain, it had been thought that the thalamus primarily filtered visual signals that it received from the retina,” said Martha Bickford, Ph.D., professor of anatomical biology sciences and neurobiology at the UofL. “We found that the thalamus plays a bigger role in that it actually may help to sort and interpret visual information so that the brain can accurately gauge the movement of surrounding objects”

    Examining the visual pathways of mice, Bickford and her colleagues, including William Guido, Ph.D., chair of anatomical sciences and neurobiology at UofL, found that the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), a part of thalamus, not only serves as a filter of information, but may change the information in such a way that it helps us account for our own eye or body movements when tracking the movement of objects around us.

    “It is very exciting to uncover this expanded role for the dLGN,” Bickford said. “We now have a new avenue to explore the relationships between sensory and motor pathways of the brain. Continued study of these relationships may help us to understand sensory deficits that occur in conditions such as Parkinson’s Disease, other movement disorders and spatial and visual attention disorders.”

     

    July 21, 2015

    Daniel Pitino Foundation grant ensures 5,600 Kentucky children continue to receive cardiac care

    New custom vehicle enables UofL Physicians staff to reach patients around the state who need specialized care
    Daniel Pitino Foundation grant ensures 5,600 Kentucky children continue to receive cardiac care

    Thanks to a nearly $57,000 gift from the Daniel Pitino Foundation, 5,600 children throughout the state of Kentucky will continue to receive life-saving cardiac care from doctors with University of Louisville Physicians.

    On Tuesday, July 21, a new van was dedicated that is critical to delivering those services. The van, bought with the gift from the foundation, was unveiled during a news conference at the UofL Physicians Health Care Outpatient Center.

    For more than four decades,doctors and staff affiliated with the University of Louisville have packed their bags every week and traveled the state to give those thousands of children with heart problems specialized care close to their homes.

    The pediatric cardiology team travels to eight rotating sites from Ashland to Paducah and places in between, bringing all their supplies and medical equipment - such as EKG and echocardiogram machines - in a customized van made just for the task. The team, which lives on the road four days a week, reaches up to 50 patients a day and more than 5,600 per year.

    For many of these children, the van makes it possible to get the care they need without having to travel hours to Louisville and have their parents take time off work and spend precious resources on travel expenses and hotels. For some with very limited resources, it makes the difference between getting the care they need and not getting care at all.

    But over the years as the latest van aged, it became unreliable, at times leaving the doctors and staff without a way to transport their equipment to patients. Now, thanks to the $56,901 grant from the Daniel Pitino Foundation, the pediatric cardiology travel team has a brand new van made just for them to reach the patients they serve.

    “We are so thankful to the Daniel Pitino Foundation for this generous grant that helps us reach so many children in Kentucky who need our services,” said Dr. Walter Sobczyk, senior pediatric cardiologist at UofL Physicians and an associate professor at the UofL School of Medicine.

    “Getting care in rural and outlying areas, far from large cities like Louisville, is a very tough task for many families. They have enough to worry about without adding travel and the associated expenses to the mix. We believe that every child deserves access to the health care they need, no matter their circumstances. The van helps ensure they get expert care and have access to the latest in medical advancements and treatments so they can live the best possible life.”

    The Daniel Pitino Foundation was founded by UofL men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino and his wife, JoAnne, to honor the memory of their infant son, Daniel, who died of a congenital heart condition in 1987. The foundation’s mission is to benefit underprivileged children and other charitable causes.

    “In recognizing the quality care and treatment provided by the doctors and staff of UofL Physicians across the Commonwealth, our board is pleased that we can provide support for the transportation needs of these dedicated individuals,” said Ron Carmicle, executive vice president of the Daniel Pitino Foundation’s board.

    For many patients, the van’s services are invaluable.

    “It’s made a huge difference in our lives,” said Jill Story, of Benton, Ky., whose daughter Jacee, 16, sees the van’s doctors because of a congenital heart defect. Her husband Matt, 45, also has a congenital heart defect and has been seeing the van’s doctors since he was a child. “It keeps us from having to routinely travel more than three hours to Louisville for their care.”

    More about the pediatric cardiology outreach program

    The outreach van travels to sites around Kentucky, including Owensboro, Bowling Green, Paducah, Ashland, Murray and Elizabethtown. On most days, the team consists of two doctors and six support staff.  At each site, the team leases office space for the day, where the staff sees up to 50 patients a day, four days a week, Monday through Friday.

    The staff also sees referrals from pediatricians and local hospitals. Some patients of the outreach program, like Matt Story, are adults who have been seeing the team’s doctors since they were children.

    For patients who need surgery or more complex procedures, the team can arrange for care at Kosair Children’s Hospital in Louisville, as well as transport there.

    Back in Louisville, the team also is part of a statewide telemedicine network, where staff at 27 hospitals around the state can digitally transmit results of a heart test for immediate analysis by pediatric cardiology specialists with UofL Physicians at Kosair Children’s Hospital. The UofL Physicians staff at the hospital read up to 2,500 echocardiograms a year.

    Initially a state-funded program in the 1950s and 1960s, funding for the outreach van dried up in the late 1970s, leaving the pediatric cardiology clinical practice of the University of Louisville, now part of University of Louisville Physicians, to supply the funding and keep it going.

    About University of Louisville Physicians

    University of Louisville Physiciansisthe largest multispecialty physician practice in the Louisville region, with nearly 600 physicians in more than 78 specialties and subspecialties, including primary care. Our doctors are the professors and researchers of the University of Louisville School of Medicine, teaching tomorrow’s physicians and leading research into medical advancements. For more information, visit www.uoflphysicians.com.

    About the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center

    The University of Louisville Health Sciences Center is the city’s only academic medical center. Approximately 1,000 faculty members are involved in education, research and clinical care.  The UofL HSC is home to more than 650 medical and dental residents, 3,000 students pursuing degrees in health-related fields within the Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing and Public Health and Information Sciences, as well as 14 interdisciplinary centers and institutes. Approximately $140 million in extramural funding enables researchers to uncover the causes of disease and better ways to prevent, treat and cure those diseases. Patients are seen at the Ambulatory Care Building, The James Graham Brown Cancer Center, the UofL Physicians Outpatient Center and University Hospital, which is the primary adult teaching hospital for the School of Medicine. University Hospital’s public mission is steeped in history and now is most clearly visible through its provision of nearly $90 million of health care to the uninsured annually.

    High school students do summer right with medical research internships at UofL

    Students mentored by James Graham Brown Cancer Center scientists present research posters.
    High school students do summer right with medical research internships at UofL

    JGBCC High School Research Interns 2015

    When Mary Osborne and some of her classmates toured the James Graham Brown Cancer Center (JGBCC) and research facilities at the University of Louisville, she had a lot of questions. The sophomore at Central Hardin High School was fascinated by the research and treatments that Brian Clem, Ph.D. described for the students.

    “When we got to ask him questions. I basically ended up grilling him about what he was doing,” Osborne said.

    Clem, an assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics at UofL and a researcher with JGBCC, appreciated her curiosity and encouraged her to apply for the Summer Research Intern Program sponsored by JGBCC for high school students.

    “Mary asked me probably 30 questions on that tour. Her interest and enthusiasm stood out,” Clem said. “I definitely requested to have her as an intern.”

    The 2015 Summer Research Intern Program provided 14 high school students from the Greater Louisville area with the opportunity to work in a University of Louisville medical research lab under the guidance of some of the top cancer researchers in the nation. Each student is assigned one of the Cancer Center’s research faculty as a mentor and works in that researcher’s lab for eight weeks. JGBCC has hosted the program for the past 13 summers as a way to reach out to the area’s budding scientists.

    “I love science and I love that there never is really an answer to everything. There is always another question,” said Osborne, who hopes to pursue a career in medicine or science. “We can find treatments for cancer, but we want to find treatments for individual people. Every cancer is different.”

    Many of the students in the program aspire to careers in medicine or research, and having spent a summer working in a medical lab and with an established researcher is an impressive point on the student’s resume and college applications. Another student in the program, Kyle Bilyeu, graduated from Louisville’s Trinity High School this spring and has been working with John Eaton, Ph.D., and Chi Li, Ph.D., this summer. He sees the program as a chance to get ahead on the path to becoming a clinical oncologist.

    “This experience is invaluable. This introduction puts me ahead of everyone as I progress through my career goals,” said Bilyeu, who will enroll at UofL this fall as an undergraduate.

    The program also gives UofL the chance to introduce the University’s vibrant research community to bright, curious students from the local area like Osborne and Bilyeu.

    “UofL and the Cancer Center are trying to get high school students interested in science,” Clem said. “We want to highlight what UofL has to offer in terms of research to keep them in the city instead of going elsewhere for their education. Plus, it gets my foot in the door with them. If I find a really good student, I like to have them come back.”

    Clem says that the researchers also benefit from having the young students in the lab.

    “They bring a lot of different dynamics to the lab during the summer. It reinforces your teaching and mentorship ability,” Clem said. “High school students are inexperienced in the science background and knowledge necessary to work in the lab. You have to start from scratch. It is amazing to see how they progress in their knowledge base and ability to grasp new ideas and gain hands-on experience.”

    Clem said one of the most difficult lessons for a high school-age student is understanding that experiments don’t always work the first time.

    “The students get a crash course in the ups and downs of things not working and troubleshooting. They realize that research isn’t about everything working; 80 to 90 percent of it is about why stuff isn’t working,” Clem said.

    The high school students presented posters representing their summer research work on Thursday, July 30 in the lobby of the Kosair Charities Clinical and Translational Research Building, along with undergraduate summer research students from other programs.

    Spinal cord injury patient's foundation sponsors Crawford's Kid for therapy visit

    Becomes first child to use new tools designed especially for children
    Spinal cord injury patient's foundation sponsors Crawford's Kid for therapy visit

    Evander Conroy is the first to use a treadmill specially designed for pediatric Locomotor Training

    Four-year-old Evander Conroy is visiting Louisville this summer from his home in Sydney, Australia to continue therapy designed to help him gain the ability to walk. Evander is receiving Locomotor Training (LT) with University of Louisville researcher Andrea Behrman, Ph.D., director of the Kosair Charities Center for Pediatric NeuroRecovery, a clinical services division of UofL’s Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC).

    To make this trip to Louisville even more special, Evander will be the first child to utilize a newly developed locomotor treadmill designed specifically for children. Previously, Behrman and her team had to adapt adult devices to fit Evander and other children who come from around the world for the therapy.

    Helping make the visit possible is the Crawford's Kid program, created by the Todd Crawford Foundation to Cure Paralysis, which provides funds to help cover the family’s expenses related to the trip to Louisville. Evander, the second “Crawford's Kid,” will spend five weeks in Louisville receiving booster LT therapy and participating in research to better understand the muscle activity contributing to his progress for sitting, standing and stepping.

    Evander’s spine was damaged by a malignant tumor present in his chest cavity at birth, and his family was told he would spend his life in a wheelchair. However, his mother, Clare, met Behrman at a spinal cord injury conference in Australia and learned about LT, an activity-based rehabilitation approach Behrman provides at Frazier Rehab Institute, a part of KentuckyOne Health, in Louisville. Evander previously came to Louisville for therapy with Behrman in 2013 and again in 2014, and has experienced significant progress. Through the therapy, Evander has been able to move his legs and take independent steps.

    The Todd Crawford Foundation grew out of efforts to assist Crawford following his own injury in 2002. Crawford was 22 years old and had just graduated from college when he suffered a spinal cord injury that left him in a wheelchair. His family and friends organized fundraisers to help during his physical rehabilitation. Crawford, who earned an MBA from UofL, is president of Crawford Designs and continues the fundraising events, including the 5K Run, Walk or Roll. Funds from the events support Crawford’s Kids and other programs affiliated with KSCIRC, as well as spinal cord awareness and advocacy organizations.

    “We are able to help financially assist these kids coming to Louisville because we have a large group of wonderful people who come to our events and support our mission. For this, we are continually grateful,” Crawford said.

    The new treadmill is the result of a collaborative effort of Behrman and her colleagues in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center and others throughout the university, especially from the UofL Speed School of Engineering. Funding for the development of the prototype came from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. Additional funding from the Coulter Foundation will be used in this collaborative effort throughout the university to move this device forward to commercialization as a clinical unit for use in pediatric rehabilitation.

    About Locomotor Training

    Andrea Behrman, Ph.D.,is a professor in UofL’s Department of Neurological Surgery and director of the Kosair Charities Center for Pediatric NeuroRecovery. Her research focus is to develop and test therapeutic methods that promote recovery after spinal cord injury in children and adults. Behrman has found that early, intensive therapy harnesses the damaged system’s remarkable capacity to change. With intensive, specific therapies capitalizing on this plasticity of the spinal cord and nervous system, children like Evander Conroy who were never expected to get better are getting better. While intensive activity-based therapy does not always lead to fully independent walking, evidence shows it improves mobility, functional skills, quality of life and overall health.

    Registration now open for UofL Geriatric Health Care Symposium

    ‘Maximizing Independence for Optimal Aging’ theme of Sept. 18th event
    Registration now open for UofL Geriatric Health Care Symposium

    Registration is now open for the 15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium, “Maximizing Independence for Optimal Aging,” presented by the University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging.

    The symposium will be held 7:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m., Friday, Sept. 18, at the Founders Union Building of UofL’s Shelby Campus, 9001 Shelbyville Road.

    Keynoting the event will be David Morris, Ph.D., interim chair of the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. A licensed physical therapist and known nationally for his expertise in physical therapy for seniors, Morris will speak on “Fitness for Life.”

    Other sessions at the symposium include “Google Glass in Rural Nursing Homes and Home Health,” “Preventive Care in Older Adults,” “Polypharmacy 2.0 – Antipsychotic Meds,” “Maximizing Oral Health,” “Update on Dementia” and more.

    Faculty include Amelia Kiser, M.D., Laura Morton, M.D., Christian Furman, M.D. and Daniela Neamtu, M.D., all from the UofL Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine; Demetra Antimisiaris, Pharm.D., UofL Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Mike Mansfield, D.M.D., and Gustavo Oliveira, D.M.D., UofL School of Dentistry; Belinda Setters, M.D., Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Benjamin Mast, Ph.D., UofL Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences; and Anne Veno, R.N., Episcopal Church Home.

    Continuing education credits are available through the UofL Department of Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development for physicians, nurses, physical therapists and dentists. Continuing education credit for social workers is in process, and the program is pending approval by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

    Registration before Aug. 15 qualifies for early bird discounts. Registration before Aug. 15 is $125 for physicians; $35 for students; and $100 for all others. Valid identification is required to qualify for registration categories.

    To register and for more information, go to the symposium website.

    Combination vaccine could reduce number of shots for infants

    UofL physician-led study showing hexavalent vaccine safe and effective against six diseases
    Combination vaccine could reduce number of shots for infants

    Gary S. Marshall, M.D.

    A new combination vaccine may reduce the number of injections required to keep infants and toddlers up to date with the United States infant immunization schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a phase III trial reported in the August 2015 issue of Pediatrics, the vaccine was determined to be effective, safe and well-tolerated. Gary S. Marshall, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Louisville, was the principal investigator of the multi-center trial and first author of the report.

    The hexavalent vaccine combination, known as DTaP5-IPV-Hib-HepB, is aligned with the recommended immunization schedule and is expected to protect children against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and hepatitis B. The trial, coordinated at UofL, included nearly 1500 children in multiple centers across the United States.

    The long list of immunizations in the recommended immunization schedule can lead to deferred injections and limit the addition of new vaccines. Depending on which vaccine combinations are used by an individual medical practice, this new vaccine combination may mean an infant receives 1 to 4 fewer injections.

    “It has gotten complicated because there are so many vaccines, which is good news because there are fewer sick children. Having combination vaccines is more good news – it makes things simpler without compromising protection,” Marshall said. “Hopefully, this vaccine combination will improve coverage rates. Studies show that when you use combination vaccines, more kids get vaccinated on time and by two years of age more are fully protected. When you make it easier, you get better coverage.”

    A similar hexavalent vaccine has been available in Europe for more than a decade and has resulted in more timely immunizations.

    The report in Pediatrics, entitled “Immunogenicity, Safety, and Tolerability of a Hexavalent Vaccine in Infants,” indicates that children who were given the new vaccine developed immunity to the listed diseases equivalent to that received from an existing immunization regimen. The children experienced a slightly higher rate of redness at the injection site and slightly higher rate of self-limited fever following the injections, as compared with the established regimen. Children receiving both the new vaccine and the established regimen were followed for serious adverse health events for six months following the final dose, with no safety signals raised in either of the two groups.

    The new vaccine is currently under review by the Food and Drug Administration. After approval, the vaccine will be available for incorporation into the routine childhood schedule.

    “Once it is licensed, we can take pride in having brought this new vaccine to the pediatric community and having done our part to simplify the routine immunization schedule,” Marshall said.

    FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE:  Dr. Marshall has been an investigator on clinical trials funded by GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer and Sanofi Pasteur, and he also has received honoraria from these companies for service on advisory boards.

    How can 3D printing advance medicine and scientific research?

    UofL's Tim Gornet will explain at the next “Beer with a Scientist” program August 26
    How can 3D printing advance medicine and scientific research?

    Tim Gornet, manager of the Rapid Prototyping Center at UofL

    As the manager of the Rapid Prototyping Center (RPC) at the University of Louisville, Tim Gornet has collaborated on numerous exciting and groundbreaking research and medical applications. Most recently, the center created a three-dimensional model of a child’s defective heart to allow the surgeons to plan and prepare for his surgery.

    At the next “Beer with a Scientist” event, Gornet will discuss more potential applications for 3D printing in medicine, scientific research and advanced manufacturing.

    The program begins at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, August 26 at Against the Grain Brewery, 401 E. Main St. A 30-minute presentation will be followed by an informal Q&A session.

    The Beer with a Scientist program began in 2014 and is the brainchild of UofL cancer researcher Levi Beverly, Ph.D. Once a month, the public is invited to enjoy exactly what the title promises:  beer and science.

    Admission is free. Purchase of beer, other beverages or menu items is not required but is encouraged.

    Organizers add that they also encourage Beer with a Scientist patrons to drink responsibly.

    For more information and to suggest future Beer with a Scientist topics, follow Louisville Underground Science on Facebook.

    On August 29, 'Do Good, Be Bad'

    Scoppechio kicks off million-dollar campaign to 'Splat Out Cancer'
    On August 29, 'Do Good, Be Bad'

    The countdown to “Splat Out Cancer” has officially begun. After months of preparation, the large-scale fundraising event dedicated to raising $1 million for the University of Louisville’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center (JGBCC) is set to kickoff Aug. 29 on the corner of Sixth and Market streets in downtown Louisville.

    With the goal of 1,000-plus balloons being launched from catapults in one day, the “Splat Out Cancer” team is preparing to use over 50 gallons of Benjamin Moore’s Aura® Exterior paint to create one of the largest community-generated works of art in Louisville history.

    “You get to do good and be bad,” said Jerry Preyss, CEO of Scoppechio, the Louisville-based ad agency that created and is overseeing the execution of Splat Out Cancer. “For $25 bucks you get to launch a balloon filled with paint and see it splat against a giant wall. And nobody gets arrested. Now how much fun is that?”

    Currently the JGBCC has over 165 cancer trials in process, and nearly a third of those are new, groundbreaking treatments developed by JGBCC researchers.

    “We rely heavily on philanthropic dollars to move many of our most promising drugs and therapies into human clinical trials,” said JGBCC Director Donald Miller, M.D., Ph.D. “The money from this event will be used exclusively to accelerate research projects to the clinical trials. One million dollars can help transfer multiple projects out of the lab into a Phase 1 clinical stage trial.”

    “We have a sense of urgency at UofL,” said UofL President James R. Ramsey. “We need to take translational research to the clinic to improve the quality of life for people with cancer. The support for Splat Out Cancer will enable us to take the research to the clinic and move forward. We are proud to be part of this initiative and the work being done at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center.”

    “Every dollar donated by sponsors, groups and participants goes directly to reaching the goal of $1 million. And besides the activities on the 29th, there will be other components to this program to raise the $1 million,” Preyss added.

    Event sponsors include Benjamin Moore Paints, the Yum! Brands Foundation, KFC, Interapt, Outfront Media, KentuckyOne Health, Humana, LG&E-KU, Onco360, Old National Bank, NPC Internatonal and Babs and Lee Robinson.

    “We are so thankful for the generous involvement and donations from our sponsors and, particularly, Benjamin Moore,” said Scoppechio Founder and Executive Chairman and UofL Board of Trustees Member Debbie Scoppechio. “As a four-time cancer survivor, this initiative hits home for me. In fact, I believe one of the reasons I’m alive today is because of the work being done at the JGBCC.”

    With nine Benjamin Moore retail locations in the Louisville area, the paint maker is playing a critical role in Splat Out Cancer with its expertise, donated paint and coordinated fundraising efforts in all Benjamin Moore area stores.

    The festivities begin at 11 a.m. at Sixth and Main with inaugural splats by local figures, James Graham Brown Cancer Center doctors and cancer survivors. Decked out in a lab coat and goggles, groups and individuals will be able to splat throughout the day from one of three giant balloon launchers that will target a framed canvas on the wall of 539 W. Market St. Other activities include a kid’s area splat wall, photo wall, food trucks and booths with information and fun giveaways. Local celebrities, mascots and Louisville sports teams representatives also will be in attendance.

    The film production company 180 Degrees Film will shoot throughout the day for an upcoming documentary about Splat Out Cancer. The company's “Cancer Confessions” booth also will allow people the opportunity to share their personal cancer story.

    Individuals and groups who preregister with donations on SplatOutCancer.com also will receive a commemorative t-shirt.

    “The Louisville community is extraordinary in the way it supports the great sports teams at the University. At the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, they are doing championship work in the field of cancer research. It’s important to support them too and bring visibility to what they are doing to beat cancer. We are looking forward to seeing a lot of people on the 29th,” Preyss said.

    ###

    Visit SplatOutCancer.com to sign up, donate, sponsor or learn more about this event.
    Also follow Splat Out Cancer on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @SplatOutCancer and #SplatOutCancer

    About the James Graham Brown Cancer Center
    The James Graham Brown Cancer Center is a key component of the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center. As part of the region's leading academic, research and teaching health center, the cancer center provides the latest medical advances to patients, often long before they become available in non-teaching settings. The JGBCC is a part of KentuckyOne Health and is affiliated with the Kentucky Cancer Program. It is the only cancer center in the region to use a unified approach to cancer care, with multidisciplinary teams of physicians working together to guide patients through diagnosis, treatment and recovery. For more information, visit our website, http://browncancercenter.louisville.edu.
    About Benjamin Moore
    Founded in 1883, Benjamin Moore is North America’s favorite paint, color and coatings brand. A leading manufacturer of premium quality residential and commercial coatings, Benjamin Moore maintains a relentless commitment to innovation and sustainable manufacturing practices. The
    portfolio spans the brand’s flagship paint lines including Aura®Regal® Selectben® as well as the most environmentally friendly premium paint in the marketplace today, Natura®. Benjamin Moore is renowned for its expansive color portfolio, offering consumers and designers more than 3,500 colors. Benjamin Moore paints are available exclusively from its more than 5,000 locally owned and operated paint and decorating retailers.
    About Scoppechio
    Scoppechio (previously known as Creative Alliance) is an independent, full-service advertising agency located in the heart of the Louisville business district. With over 165 employees, it serves a broad portfolio of clients in the restaurant, healthcare and B2C verticals. Founded in 1987 and now the largest agency in Kentucky, Scoppechio provides a broad range of strategic communications services that includes broadcast, digital, print, multicultural and experiential marketing programs. Clients include restaurant brands from Yum! Brands, Inc., and Darden, to a broad range of clients that include GE, LG&E, CHS (Community Health Systems), Thorntons and Kentucky Travel & Tourism. To learn more, visit Scoppechio.com

     

    spirit of 45 logo

    spirit of 45 logo
    Full-size image:43 KB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    UofL honors veterans on 70th anniversary of WWII’s ending

    Events on Aug. 15th and 16th highlight Louisville war contributions, veterans, more

    Several units at the University of Louisville will join together with groups from throughout Louisville and the United States to commemorate the end of World War II.

    “Keep the Spirit of ’45 Alive! 70th Anniversary of the End of WWII” will be held Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 15 and 16.

    With the surrender of Japan on Aug. 14, 1945, the Second World War came to a close. Activities for the 70th Anniversary are planned throughout the United States. The website www.spiritof45.org provides more information.

    “As time goes on, we lose more and more of the people whose service, both in the theater of war and on the home front, protected our freedoms during the dark days of World War II,” said University of Louisville President James R. Ramsey. “That is why the University of Louisville is honored to take part in commemorations such as Keep the Spirit of ’45 Alive.

    “We must never forget what our Greatest Generation sacrificed so that we can all be free.”

    In Louisville, Saturday’s commemoration will take place at the Vintage WarBirds Hangar 5 at Bowman Field, 2700 Gast Blvd. From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., exhibits, demonstrations and entertainment will evoke memories of Louisville during World War II. Vintage military equipment, vehicles and aircraft will be on display, along with other historical exhibits. Attendees who remember the war will have the opportunity to record their WWII memories for future generations. Entertainment will be provided by the Ladies of Liberty, a three-woman singing troupe that performs 1940s hits in the style of the Andrews Sisters. Admission is free.

    From 6 to 10 p.m. in the same location, a “Canteen Dinner and Dance” will be held, also featuring the Ladies of Liberty and the Don Krekel Orchestra performing big-band hits of the period. Admission is $45 per person.

    Sunday, Aug. 16, is “Honor Flight Night” at VFW Post #1170, 107 Evergreen Rd. in Middletown. The Honor Flight Network is a non-profit organization dedicated to making it possible for veterans to travel to Washington, D.C., to see the World War II, Korean and Vietnam War memorials.

    Kentucky’s Bluegrass Chapter of Honor Flight will honor those World War II veterans who are unable to make the trip. Dinner will feature a video showing the 2015 D-Day Honor Flight on June 6 to the World War II Memorial. Admission for veterans and their guests is free.

    Honor Flight Night is sponsored by the Office of the President at the University of Louisville. Participating in Saturday’s events will be UofL’s Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging, School of Dentistry, Kent School of Social Work and Department of History. Other sponsors include the Frazier History Museum, the Kentucky Historical Society, Jean Frazier and a variety of military and veterans organizations.

    For information on Saturday’s events, contact the local Spirit of ’45 office, 502-387-4412 or Dell Courtney, dellcourtn@aol.com.

    Stanford medicine chair to present UofL Leonard Leight Lecture Sept. 30

    Stanford medicine chair to present UofL Leonard Leight Lecture Sept. 30

    Robert Harrington, M.D.

    The chair of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University will present the 2015 Leonard Leight Lecture at the University of Louisville.

    Robert Harrington, M.D., will speak at noon, Wednesday, Sept. 30, at the 16th Floor Conference Center of the Rudd Heart and Lung Center, 201 Abraham Flexner Way. Admission is free.

    The Leonard Leight Lecture is presented annually by the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. For 30 years until 1996, Leight was a practicing cardiologist in Louisville and played a major role in developing cardiology services and bringing innovative treatment modalities in heart disease to Louisville.

    The Leonard Leight Lecture series was established in 1994 and is made possible by gifts from Dr. and Mrs. Kurt Ackermann and Medical Center Cardiologists to the Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation.

    About Robert Harrington, M.D.

    The Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine at Stanford since 2012, Harrington is an interventional cardiologist and experienced clinical investigator in the area of heart disease. At Stanford, he leads a department of 220 faculty members in 14 divisions.

    Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Harrington spent five years as the director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute, regarded as the world’s largest academic clinical research organization. The institute has conducted studies in 65 countries while building diverse research programs in clinical trials and health services research. He joined the faculty at Duke in 1993.

    As a clinical investigator, he has worked primarily in the area of acute ischemic heart disease, or heart disease resulting from restricted blood flow to the heart muscle. He has established clinical research collaborations that involve investigators from around the world.

    “My science has progressed from the focused study of thrombosis to using more broadly the tools of clinical science to answer clinical questions while finding new and innovative ways to design clinical trials and use clinical data to improve the care of patients,” Harrington said. “Society needs academic centers to step up and figure out how we are going to deliver health care while also advancing science and educating the next generation of clinical leaders.”

    Harrington is a native of Massachusetts. He has an undergraduate degree in English from College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass. He received his medical degree from Tufts University in 1986 and completed an internship, residency and served as chief resident at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. He trained in general and interventional cardiology as a fellow at Duke.

    He has served as an associate editor of the American Heart Journal, an editorial board member of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and one of the editors of the 13th edition of Hurst's the Heart, a leading textbook in cardiovascular medicine. He is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians as well as a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Intervention, the American College of Chest Physicians and the European Society of Cardiology. He is a member of the board of trustees for the American College of Cardiology.

    September golf tourneys benefit UofL cancer center

    September golf tourneys benefit UofL cancer center

    Two golf tournaments in September will benefit the University of Louisville’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center, a part of KentuckyOne Health.

    The 7th Annual Don Happel Memorial Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, Sept. 12, at Eagle Creek Golf Course in La Grange, Ky., and the 5th Annual Hammertime Golf Scramble will be Monday, Sept. 14, at Iroquois Golf Course in Louisville.

    About the Don Happel Tournament

    The Happel Tournament tees off at 8:30 a.m., Sept. 12, with a shotgun start. The tournament is a scramble and has payouts for the 1st, 2nd and “Lucky” 13th” holes. Cost is $300 per team of four and each player can purchase two red tees for $10. Hole sponsorships are available for $50 each.

    The Eagle Creek Golf Course is located at 2820 S. Highway 53, La Grange. Since the tournament’s inception, it has raised almost $18,000 for the cancer center, helping to provide education, transportation and other non-clinical services.

    Registration deadline is Aug. 29. For details, contact Bret Happel at 502-253-2207 or Cindy Hall at 502-767-3752.

    About the Hammertime Golf Scramble

    The Hammertime Scramble benefits the Larry Smith Lung Cancer Fund at the cancer center and will start at 1 p.m.  on Aug. 14. The event features a putting contest, long drive contest, silent auction, door prizes and the chance to win a new car. Individual fee is $75 and a team of four is $300. Sponsorships range from $100 to $3,500.

    The Iroquois Golf Course is at 1501 Rundill Road, Louisville. The tournament is affiliated with the UofL Alumni Association. The tournament’s goal is $50,000 to help fund a new cancer screening van that will provide cancer screenings to underserved populations across Kentucky.

    For details and to register, go to the tournament web page or contact Linda Dame at linda.dame@louisville.edu.

    About the James Graham Brown Cancer Center

    The James Graham Brown Cancer Center is a key component of the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center. As part of the region's leading academic, research and teaching health center, the cancer center provides the latest medical advances to patients, often long before they become available in non-teaching settings. The JGBCC is a part of KentuckyOne Health and is affiliated with the Kentucky Cancer Program. It is the only cancer center in the region to use a unified approach to cancer care, with multidisciplinary teams of physicians working together to guide patients through diagnosis, treatment and recovery. For more information, visit our website, http://browncancercenter.louisville.edu.

    Focused electrical blasts increase survival for patients with pancreatic cancer

    Focused electrical blasts increase survival for patients with pancreatic cancer

    Robert Martin, M.D., Ph.D.

    Use of irreversible electroporation (IRE) doubles the survival time for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer say researchers at the University of Louisville in a paper in the September edition of the Annals of Surgery (http://journals.lww.com/annalsofsurgery/Abstract/2015/09000/Treatment_of_200_Locally_Advanced__Stage_III_.10.aspx).

    “The appropriate and precise use of IRE in appropriately selected patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer can result in a median overall survival close to 24 months, which is nearly double the survival rate with the best new chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy,” said Robert Martin, M.D., Ph.D., director of surgical oncology at UofL.

    IRE uses ultra-short but strong electrical fields to create holes in cell membranes, ultimately leading to cell death. The main use of IRE lies in tumor removal in regions where precision and conservation of the basic cellular matrix, blood flow and nerves are of importance.

    In the study, 200 patients at six sites throughout the United States received IRE following chemotherapy. The patients were followed for up to seven years following their initial diagnosis and initiation of treatment. The average survival time for patients was close to two years.

    IRE is commonly performed as an open surgery with an incision of about six to eight centimeters. This allows for better visualization for probe placement, as well as combined tumor removal as dictated for individual patients. This commonly requires a five- to seven-day hospital stay and a two- to three-week recovery for the patient to get back to their baseline quality of life

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers and is expected to climb from the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States to the second by 2020. Ninety four percent of pancreatic cancer patients will die within five years of diagnosis, and 74 percent of patients die within the first year of diagnosis.

    “This study demonstrates that IRE, in conjunction with standard-of-care, may substantially prolong the survival rates of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer,” Martin said. “While additional research is needed, ablation may represent an addition to the current standard of care for Stage III pancreatic cancer patients whose only treatment options until now have been chemotherapy or a combination of chemo-radiation therapy.”

    Patients in the study were seen at UofL James Graham Brown Cancer Center, a part of KentuckyOne Health, Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, the Cleveland Clinic, Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta, Swedish Medical Center in Denver and Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Atlanta.

    Martin initially reported these finding at the American Surgical Association annual meeting in April 2015.

    New Optimal Aging Lecture Series kicks off Sept. 9

    Event launches Optimal Aging Month by UofL Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging
    New Optimal Aging Lecture Series kicks off Sept. 9

    Robert Friedland, M.D.

    The Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging at the University of Louisville has established September as “Optimal Aging Month” with several events planned. The month’s activities kick off Sept. 9 with the Optimal Aging Lecture Series designed to explore the science of aging.

    Robert Friedland, M.D., professor of neurology, will present “Gene Therapy, Diet and the Biology of Neurodegeneration” at 11:30 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 9, at The University Club, 200 E. Brandeis Ave.

    Admission is $17 per person and includes lunch. Reservations are required online. For information, call 502-852-8953 or email ann.burke@louisville.edu.

    Holder of the Mason C. and Mary D. Rudd Endowed Chair in Neurology, Friedland is a clinical and research neurologist devoted to the study of brain disorders associated with aging. His work has focused on clinical and biological issues in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders.

    Friedland has authored or co-authored more than 200 scientific publications and has current research funding from the National Institute on Aging as well as several foundations, institutes, corporations and families. He has had more than $1 million in research funding to support his work every year since 1985.

    UofL medical students and Parkinson’s Disease patients to gather for “Buddy” program kickoff September 3

    Pairs to meet monthly for one-on-one exchange benefiting patients and students
    UofL medical students and Parkinson’s Disease patients to gather for “Buddy” program kickoff September 3

    Kathrin LaFaver, M.D.

    Take a walk in the park.

    Meet for a cup of coffee.

    These simple social interactions can make a world of difference to patients with Parkinson’s Disease and to University of Louisville medical students who will have the opportunity to see what daily life is like for individuals with the disease.

    The Parkinson’s Buddy Program, a unique new partnership between the UofL School of Medicine and the Parkinson Support Center, has matched 25 “buddies” from the first-year class of medical students with patients served by the center. In the first program of its kind for Parkinson’s patients, the pairs are participating in a year-long program designed to give the patients social interaction and allow them to share their stories with the medical students, who in turn gain first-hand knowledge about living with a nervous system disorder.

    The program kicks off Thursday, September 3 when the buddy pairs will meet for the first time from 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. at the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, 1640 Lyndon Farm Ct., #100 in Louisville. (Editor’s note:  Members of the media are invited to attend.)

    Student-patient pairs then are encouraged to meet on their own about once a month for a board game, lecture or exercise class to share their stories and enjoy time together. Kathrin LaFaver, M.D., Raymond Lee Lebby Chair for Parkinson’s Disease Research in the Department of Neurology at UofL, said the exchanges will give the students a deeper understanding of how patients cope with the disease.

    “This program will educate medical students on Parkinson’s and neurological disease and help them understand the day-to-day issues faced by individuals living with Parkinson’s,” LaFaver said.

    Allie Hanson, assistant director of the Parkinson Support Center, proposed the idea for the program as a way to improve the wellbeing of patients served by the center.

    “The patients will be able to share their stories, plus the meetings will reduce some of the social isolation that people with Parkinson’s can experience,” Hanson said.

    In addition to meeting with their patient buddies, students will keep a journal reflecting on their experience after each buddy meeting. Students also will attend hour-long mentoring sessions each month with LaFaver, the director of the Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Clinic at UofL Physicians. The seminars will provide additional medical information and inform the students about research and career opportunities in neurology and movement disorders.

    Parkinson’s Disease is a chronic and progressive brain disorder of the central nervous system. The motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease result from the death of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, a region of the midbrain. Dopamine is the chemical that sends messages to the part of the brain that controls movement and coordination. The loss of dopamine causes neurons to fire without normal control, leaving patients less able to control their movement. Patients are also frequently suffering from so-called “non-motor” symptoms including loss of smell, constipation, fatigue, anxiety and depression. Muhammad Ali and Michael J. Fox are notable individuals living with Parkinson’s Disease.

    Saving lives from suicide topic of Sept. 8th program

    UofL Depression Center lecture discusses new developments in suicide prevention
    Saving lives from suicide topic of Sept. 8th program

    David Goldston, Ph.D.

    “Saving the Lives of Adolescents and Adults: New Developments in Understanding Suicidal Behavior” will be presented at the next “Building Hope” lecture sponsored by the University of Louisville Depression Center.

    The program will begin at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 8, at Second Presbyterian Church, 3701 Old Brownsboro Rd. Admission is free.

    Co-sponsored by the Louisville Chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the program will provide participants with information on new developments in understanding suicidal behavior and approaches to treatment and interventions for suicidal individuals.

    The speaker will be David Goldston, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, in the Department of Psychiatry’s Division of Child & Family Mental Health & Developmental Neuroscience at the Duke University School of Medicine. He also serves as director of the Duke Center for the Study of Suicide Prevention and Intervention.

    The University of Louisville Depression Center is Kentuckiana’s leading resource for depression and bipolar disorder treatment, research and education. It is a charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, a consortium of leading depression centers that develops and fosters connections among members to advance scientific discovery and provide stigma-free, evidence-based care to patients with depressive and bipolar illnesses.

    For more information, contact the Depression Center at 502-588-4450.

    About the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

    The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention is the leader in the fight against suicide. It funds research, offers educational programs, advocates for public policy and supports those affected by suicide. Headquartered in New York, AFSP has 75 local chapters, including Louisville, with programs and events nationwide.

    UofL vice dean receives KMA educational achievement award

    Monica Ann Shaw, M.D., honored by Kentucky Medical Association
    UofL vice dean receives KMA educational achievement award

    Monica Ann Shaw, M.D. received the Educational Achievement Award from the KMA’s David Bensema, M.D.

    Monica Ann Shaw, M.D., M.A., vice dean for the University of Louisville School of Medicine, has received the Kentucky Medical Association’s Educational Achievement Award for 2015.

    The award is presented to individuals who have made outstanding contributions and achievements in the area of medical education. David Bensema, M.D., immediate past president of the KMA, presented the award to Shaw during the organization’s annual meeting on August 29.

    “Throughout her tenure, Dr. Shaw has been committed to changing the way medical students are educated,” Bensema said. “Her passion and dedication to the growth and development of future physicians are keystones of the KMA Educational Achievement Award criteria.”

    As principal investigator on a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Grant, Shaw developed and implemented an interdisciplinary palliative care curriculum for medical students that serves as a national model for successful palliative care education. Since 2010, Shaw has served as co-investigator on a five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute for which the team has developed, implemented, and evaluated a mandatory, interprofessional palliative oncology curriculum for medical, nursing, social work and chaplaincy students. Shaw is a 2014 graduate of the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine® (ELAM®) program. She joined the University of Louisville in 1995.

    “Dr. Shaw has devoted her career to medical education. She is an exceptional teacher, physician, and mentor. She remains passionate about medicine and palliative care. She was the first clerkship director to include a reflective writing requirement for students to encourage them to focus on the patient’s story and to foster more humanistic patient care,” said Jesse Roman, M.D., chair of the UofL Department of Medicine, in nominating Shaw for the award.

    Established in 1851, the Kentucky Medical Association is a professional organization for physicians throughout the Commonwealth. The KMA works on behalf of physicians and the patients they serve to ensure the delivery of quality, affordable health care.

    Future physician-scientist wins funds for training and research

    M.D./Ph.D. student Heather Clair joins elite group of students to earn NIH grant
    Future physician-scientist wins funds for training and research

    Heather Clair

    It is never too early for medical researchers to begin obtaining funding for their work.

    Heather Clair, a student in the M.D./Ph.D. program at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, has secured a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help fund her research and education. The Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award, an F30 fellowship from the NIH, is designed to support highly promising predoctoral students in a dual-doctoral degree training program such as the M.D./Ph.D. to increase the pool of highly trained clinician-scientists in biomedical research.

    Clair won the grant in consultation with her mentor, Matt Cave, M.D., associate professor of medicine at UofL with expertise in liver disease and transplantation. Clair and Cave have designed a research plan to study of the effects of exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on the liver. Clair will be investigating how synthetic organic chemicals change the programming of the body’s cells.

    “We believe that PCBs are one of the factors leading to liver disease and other types of metabolic dysfunction – maybe diabetes, cardiovascular disease or obesity,” Clair said.

    Clair earned a master’s degree in biotechnology and worked in laboratories and other settings for a number of years, including lab work at UofL. After talking with medical students who shared their enthusiasm for working with patients, Clair decided to add clinical work to her professional palette and applied to the School of Medicine.

    “I wasn’t ready to leave research, however, so I applied to the M.D./Ph.D. program. When I got in, it was like winning the lottery – I get to do two things I love at the same time,” Clair said.

    Earning a grant from the NIH is a precocious accomplishment for a student, preparing her to obtain grants as a professional researcher.

    “Just writing the grant was a tremendous learning experience,” Clair said. “When I go back to write a K award or an RO1 as an independent investigator, I will have already done it once. It also gives me the opportunity to show the NIEHS and the NIH that I can do what I said I was going to do.”

    Students in the M.D./Ph.D. program study medicine for two years, followed by three to four years of doctorate-level biomedical research, finishing off with the final two years of medical school. Upon completing the program, the physician-scientists have fulfilled the requirements for both an M.D. and a Ph.D. degree and are ready to care for patients and conduct biomedical research at the doctorate level. The UofL program has 13 students, with enrollment having been as high as 22. The school receives between 80 and 100 applications each year for the two to three positions available.

    “These are the best medical students and the best graduate students. Having a group of students this bright at UofL helps in every possible way with the educational process,” said Donald Miller, M.D., Ph.D., director of the M.D./Ph.D. program at UofL and director of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center.

    In the past 12 years, 10 students at UofL have been awarded F30 grants, including nine In the M.D./Ph.D. program and one in the D.M.D./Ph.D. program at the School of Dentistry.

    “These grants raise the visibility of the university,” said Brian “Binks” Wattenberg, Ph.D., assistant director of the M.D./Ph.D. program. “When study sections – expert scientists in a specific area who review the grant applications – see the quality of the applications that are coming from UofL, they start to recognize this is a substantial, high quality institution.”

    Funding from an F30 grant typically adds more than $100,000 to the institution over a period of three to five years. This allows existing funds to support additional research activities in the mentor’s lab or to assist other students at the School of Medicine.

    “These grants release funds from the principal investigator whose lab they are in to support other activities,” Wattenberg said. “And if the grant pays for part of the medical school tuition, that money can be used for other students. Every dollar we get in from the outside helps everyone.”

    One of the previous grant-winning students, Janelle Fassbender, M.D., Ph.D., was mentored by Scott Whittemore, Ph.D., in neurobiology and presented a dissertation on "Improving Functional Recovery Following Spinal Cord Injury by Therapeutically Targeting the Vasculature.” After receiving her degrees in 2012, Fassbender completed a preliminary year of residency in general surgery and is back at UofL serving as a medical resident in ophthalmology.

    Other graduates from UofL’s M.D./Ph.D. program who received F30 awards have gone on to residency positions at Washington University in St. Louis, Yale University and Icahn School of Medicine at The Mt. Sinai Medical Center.

    Success in receiving the grants reflects on the quality of the research being done at UofL and the mentors.

    “As funding gets more and more competitive, it’s very important that we turn out people who have good training, good science and can compete for grants, and I think this program does that,” Miller said.

    Renewable energies topic of Beer with a Scientist Sept. 16

    Renewable energies topic of Beer with a Scientist Sept. 16

    Mahendra Sunkara, Ph.D.

    As concerns over the availability and side-effects of fossil fuels increase, scientists look for renewable energy sources to satisfy the modern world’s insatiable appetite for power. But are renewable energy sources up to the task?

    Mahendra Sunkara, Ph.D., director of the Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research at the University of Louisville’s J.B. Speed School of Engineering, will discuss the need for renewable energies and challenges associated with them at the next “Beer with a Scientist” event. Those in attendance will learn what renewable energies are, how they are used and, most importantly, how they will save our planet for future generations.

    Sunkara’s research interests include discovery of new materials, solar cells, Li Ion batteries, production of hydrogen from water and growing large crystals of diamond, gallium nitride and bulk quantities of nanowires.

    The program begins at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, September 16 at Against the Grain Brewery, 401 E. Main St. A 30-minute presentation will be followed by an informal Q&A session.

    The Beer with a Scientist program began in 2014 and is the brainchild of UofL cancer researcher Levi Beverly, Ph.D. Once a month, the public is invited to enjoy exactly what the title promises:  beer and science.

    Admission is free. Purchase of beer, other beverages or menu items is not required but is encouraged.

    Organizers add that they also encourage Beer with a Scientist patrons to drink responsibly.

    For more information and to suggest future Beer with a Scientist topics, follow Louisville Underground Science on Facebook.

    UofL Optimal Aging Month continues with cooking demo, walks

    The University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging’s Optimal Aging Month continues this week with a healthy cooking demo and participation in community walks.

    The institute will host a healthy eating demonstration at Aposento Alto Food Pantry, 2093 Midland Trail in Simpsonville, at 4:45 p.m., Friday, Sept. 11. The program will feature information, recipes and demonstrations on ways to make healthy eating fun and flavorful for the entire family.

    On Saturday, Sept. 12, the institute will participate in two community walks: the Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s and the Kentuckian Rural Diabetes Coalition Community Walks.

    The Walk to End Alzheimer’s begins with registration and check-in at 8:30 a.m. at the Great Lawn at Waterfront Park in Downtown Louisville, 231 Witherspoon St. For information and to register, visit the Walk to End Alzheimer’s website.

    The Kentuckian Rural Diabetes Coalition Walks will take place at several venues: Clear Creek Park in Shelby County; Shepherdsville City Park in Bullitt County; and Henry County Recreational Park. Registration and check-in will be at 9:30 a.m. with the walks getting underway at 10 a.m. For information, visit the coalition’s Community Walks website.

    For information about Optimal Aging Month and the Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging, contact the institute at 502-852-5629.

    Antidepressants shown to worsen depression in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder

    Antidepressants shown to worsen depression in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder

    Rif S. El-Mallakh, M.D.

    In patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, antidepressants can increase incidents of depression and mood cycling. Rif S. El-Mallakh, M.D., director of the Mood Disorders Clinical and Research Program at the University of Louisville, along with Nassir Ghaemi, M.D., of Tufts University and other researchers, conducted the first randomized clinical trial that analyzes how modern antidepressants affect patients with rapid-cycling (RC) bipolar disorder (BD). The results are published in this month’s issue of Journal of Affective Disorders.

    In the trial, the authors tracked patients with BD following an acute depressive episode. They found that rapid-cycling patients who continued antidepressants following initial treatment for the episode experienced three times the number of depressive episodes the following year as those who discontinued use of antidepressants. RC patients who continued antidepressants were episode-free 52 percent of the time, while RC patients who discontinued antidepressants were episode-free 64 percent of the time.

    Patients are considered rapid cycling in bipolar disorder if they experience at least four episodes within a 12-month period. In the United States, approximately 25 percent of bipolar patients are considered rapid cycling.

    The research was conducted within the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study, in which patients were classified as either rapid cycling or non-rapid cycling. Patients in both groups received standard mood stabilizers.

    “Whether or not antidepressants cause rapid cycling in BD is a controversial issue,” the authors said in the article. “Antidepressants are the most commonly prescribed class of medication in BD. If they cause or worsen rapid cycling, found in about 25 percent of patients with BD, this presents a major public health problem. Safely and effectively treating rather than exacerbating mood episodes in the most severely ill among this patient population is a priority.”

    Physicians and researchers have debated for years about whether antidepressants should be used over long periods of time for patients with bipolar disorder.

    El-Mallakh, professor of psychiatry in the UofL School of Medicine, has published articles on several situations in which continued use of antidepressant medications potentially was detrimental.

    In a 2008 article in Journal of Affective Disorders, El-Mallakh described a condition he attributed to long-term antidepressant use which he called “antidepressant-associated chronic irritable dysphoria” (ACID). In the article, El-Mallakh cited a number of patients who took antidepressants for long periods of time and subsequently developed a consistent state of low mood, irritability and sleep disturbance. These symptoms were relieved when the patients discontinued antidepressants.

    In a 2011 article in Medical Hypothesis, El-Mallakh analyzed data on patients whose depression initially improved with antidepressants, but later worsened. He hypothesized that some patients experienced a condition he called “tardive dysphoria,” in which antidepressants lose their effectiveness and may actually induce depression with long-term use.

    “Antidepressants are useful medications, and you don’t know if someone will be rapid cycling when you begin treating them. However, if someone has rapid cycling, you want to avoid using these drugs because the medication will probably increase mania, cycling and depression,” El-Mallakh said.

    Donna Brazile featured as speaker for minority medical educators meeting

    UofL hosting five-day conference; political strategist’s address set for Friday, Sept. 18
    Donna Brazile featured as speaker for minority medical educators meeting

    Donna Brazile

    Political strategist Donna Brazile will be a featured speaker at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the National Association of Medical Minority Educators Inc. (NAMME), hosted by the University of Louisville Sept. 16-20. The conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency Louisville, 311 S. 4th St.

    Brazile will address the group at the Friday, Sept. 18, breakfast session beginning at 8 a.m. She will speak on “Health Care Reform and the Future Health Care Provider or Why Diversity Matters.”

    For conference attendees, the cost to attend Brazile’s address also is included in the conference registration fee. Participants may register as either single-day or full-conference attendees, and both members and non-members of NAMME may attend the annual meeting. The 2015 Annual Meeting registration fee schedule is available on the NAMME website.

    NAMME is a national organization dedicated to developing and sustaining productive relationships as well as action-oriented programs among national, state and community stakeholders working to ensure racial and ethnic diversity in all of the health professions. NAMME also seeks to provide critical guidance and professional development opportunities for individuals dedicated to these efforts and the students they serve.

    The five-day conference includes panel discussions, lectures and workshops on a variety of topics related to increasing diversity among the nation’s health professions. The event also features a College Student Development and Recruitment Fair where students can learn about health professions education at colleges and universities from throughout the United States.

    About Donna Brazile:

    Veteran Democratic political strategist Donna Brazile is an adjunct professor, author, syndicated columnist, television political commentator, Vice Chair of Voter Registration and Participation at the Democratic National Committee and former interim National Chair of the Democratic National Committee, the former chair of the DNC’s Voting Rights Institute and the first African-American woman to manage a presidential campaign.

    Aside from working for the full recovery of her beloved New Orleans, Brazile’s passion is encouraging young people to vote, to work within the system to strengthen it, and to run for public office. Since 2000, Brazile has lectured at over 150 colleges and universities across the country on such topics as “Inspiring Civility in American Politics,” “Race Relations in the Age of Obama,” “Why Diversity Matters,” and “Women in American Politics: Are We There Yet?”

    She first got involved at the age of nine when she worked to elect a City Council candidate who had promised to build a playground in her New Orleans neighborhood; the candidate won, the swing set was installed, and a lifelong passion for political progress was ignited. Brazile worked on every presidential campaign from 1976 through 2000, when she became the first African-American to manage a presidential campaign.

    Author of the best-selling memoir Cooking with Grease: Stirring the Pots in American Politics, Brazile is an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, a syndicated columnist for Universal Uclick, a columnist for Ms. Magazine and O, the Oprah Magazine, and an on-air contributor to CNN and ABC, where she regularly appears on ABC’s This Week.

    In August 2009, O, The Oprah Magazine chose Brazile as one of its 20 “remarkable visionaries” for the magazine’s first-ever O Power List. In addition, she was named among the 100 Most Powerful Women by Washingtonian magazine, Top 50 Women in America by Essence magazine, and received the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s highest award for political achievement.

    She is currently on the board of the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, the National Democratic Institute, the Professional Diversity Network, the National Institute for Civil Discourse, Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and the BlackAmericaWeb.com Relief Fund Inc.  She also serves as Co-Chair for Democrats for Public Education.

    Brazile is founder and managing director of Brazile & Associates LLC, a general consulting, grassroots advocacy and training firm based in Washington.

     

    Annual UofL Geriatrics Symposium provides up-to-date interdisciplinary information on care of older adults

    The University of Louisville Geriatrics Symposium, sponsored by the Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging, is a regional resource for up-to-date training and information regarding the care of older adults. The annual event is part of Optimal Aging Month during September and will be held Friday, Sept. 18, from 7:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m. at the Founders Building on UofL’s Shelbyhurst campus, 312 N. Whittington Parkway.

    This year’s event is titled “Maximizing Independence for Optimal Aging.” Cost to attend is $150 for physicians; $125 for all other health care professionals; and $35 for medical residents and students. Continuing education credit is available. Registration is available on the conference website.

    The world’s population, including in the United States, is aging at an exponential rate. Currently there are only 7,162 allopathic and osteopathic certified geriatricians in the United States. This translates to one geriatrician for every 2,620 Americans over 75 years old.

    The projected increase in the number of older Americans is expected to change this ratio to one geriatrician for every 3,798 older Americans in 2030. Due to the projected shortfall of experts in geriatrics to provide for the rapidly aging U.S. population, it is necessary for all providers to have some exposure and ideally expert training in geriatrics principles in order to fulfill the increasing need to provide care for older adults.

    The University of Louisville Annual Geriatrics Symposium is a daylong event that  offers an interdisciplinary audience immersion in geriatric training skills. The symposium presents the most updated skills training and theories on varied topics related to the care of the geriatric patient. It is designed for a broad multidisciplinary audience including physicians, nurses, dentists, nurse practitioners, social workers, long-term care professionals, in-home care providers to elders and anyone involved in the care of elder Americans.

    Speakers include:

    • David Morris, Ph.D., Interim Chair and Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    • Belinda Setters, M.D. , Director, Mobile Acceptable Clinical Evidence Unit  and Transitional Care, Robley Rex VA Medical Center, Louisville
    • Kathy Shireman, R.N., Director of Clinical Services, Episcopal Church Home, Louisville
    • Demetra Antimisiaris, Pharm.D., Associate Professor, UofL Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
    • Christian Furman, M.D., Vice Chair, Geriatric Medicine and Professor, Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, UofL Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine, and Interim Medical Director, UofL Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging
    • Amelia R. Kiser, M.D., Assistant Professor, UofL Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine, Glasgow, Ky.
    • Mike Mansfield, D.M.D., Assistant Professor, UofL Department of General Dentistry and Oral Medicine
    • Benjamin Mast, Ph.D., Vice Chair and Associate Professor, UofL Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
    • Laura Morton, M.D., Assistant Professor, UofL Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine
    • Daniela Neamtu, M.D., Assistant Professor, UofL Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine
    • Gustavo Oliveira, D.D.S., Assistant Professor, UofL Department of Dentistry and Oral Health
    • Mary Romelfanger, R.N., Associate Director, UofL Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging

    Romelfanger is course director of the conference. For more information, visit the conference website.

     

    Posted 09-16-15

    Scholar to discuss diseases, epidemics in ancient Mesopotamia

    Scholar to discuss diseases, epidemics in ancient Mesopotamia

    Walter Farber

    A scholar who works on decoding civilization’s earliest forms of writing will speak Thursday, Sept. 24 at the University of Louisville about new clues into ancient life.

    University of Chicago Professor of Assyriology Emeritus Walter Farber, Ph.D., will discuss “Diseases and Epidemics in Ancient Mesopotamia: Medical Conceptualization and Responses.”

    Farber’s free, public lecture will begin at 4 p.m. in Ekstrom Library’s Chao Auditorium on UofL's Beknap campus. The College of Arts and Sciences’ Liberal Studies Project is the event sponsor.

    Farber is curator of the tablet collection at UChicago's Oriental Institute. He continues his academic writing since his 2013 retirement from UChicago’s Near Eastern languages and civilizations department, where he had worked since 1980.

    He has published texts of cuneiform, or inscriptions made by using reed tools to press marks into damp clay tablets. Scholars continue to scour such artifacts to decipher signs from ancient languages for glimpses into Mesopotamian life.

    For more information, contact John Hale at 502-852-2248 or john.hale@louisville.edu

    Stanford medicine chair to present 'Cardiovascular Clinical Research in the U.S.: Realities, Challenges and Opportunities'

    22nd Annual Leonard Leight Lecture set for Sept. 30
    Stanford medicine chair to present 'Cardiovascular Clinical Research in the U.S.: Realities, Challenges and Opportunities'

    Robert Harrington, M.D.

    Robert Harrington, M.D., chair and Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, will deliver the 22nd Annual Leonard Leight Lecture at the University of Louisville. The address will be held at noon, Wednesday, Sept. 30, at the Jewish Hospital Rudd Heart and Lung Center Conference Center, 16th Floor, 201 Abraham Flexner Way.

    Harrington will present “Cardiovascular Clinical Research in the U.S.: Realities, Challenges and Opportunities.” Admission is free and continuing medical and nursing education credit is available. For details, contact 852-1162.

    The Leonard Leight Lecture is presented annually by the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. For 30 years until 1996, Leight was a practicing cardiologist in Louisville and played a major role in developing cardiology services and bringing innovative treatment modalities in heart disease to Louisville. The Leonard Leight Lecture series was established in 1994 and is made possible by gifts from Dr. and Mrs. Kurt Ackermann and Medical Center Cardiologists to the Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation.

    Harrington is an interventional cardiologist and experienced clinical investigator in the area of heart disease. At Stanford, he leads a department of 220 faculty members in 14 divisions.

    Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Harrington spent five years as the director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute, regarded as the world’s largest academic clinical research organization. The institute has conducted studies in 65 countries while building diverse research programs in clinical trials and health services research. He joined the faculty at Duke in 1993.

    As a clinical investigator, he has worked primarily in the area of acute ischemic heart disease, or heart disease resulting from restricted blood flow to the heart muscle. He has established clinical research collaborations that involve investigators from around the world.

    Surgeons with Jewish Hospital / University of Louisville / University of Louisville Physicians perform first islet cell auto-transplantation procedures in Kentucky

    People with a debilitating and painful disease have a new treatment option available to them thanks to the collaborative efforts of Jewish Hospital, the University of Louisville and University of Louisville Physicians.

    Jewish Hospital, a part of KentuckyOne Health, and faculty members from the UofL School of Medicine are providing total pancreatectomy with islet cell auto-transplantation for some patients with chronic pancreatitis. Since the start of the year, six patients have undergone the procedure and all have functioning islet cells. The program is funded by an $800,000 grant from the Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence.

    Chronic pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas, can only be cured with complete removal of the pancreas (total pancreatectomy). However, removing the entire pancreas creates diabetes that is extremely difficult to control, with alternating very high and dangerous, life-threatening low blood sugars. Therefore, only a portion of the pancreas typically is removed in an attempt to prevent post-operative diabetes. This treatment does not very effectively treat the episodes of pain that lead to recurrent hospital admissions for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    The total pancreatectomy with auto-transplantation of islet cells from the pancreas is an alternative treatment being performed by a handful of facilities around the world, including Jewish Hospital. This procedure involves complete removal of the pancreas. The patient’s islet cells are isolated in a “cleanroom” facility at the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute (a partnership between UofL and the Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence) and then re-implanted into the patient to prevent diabetes.

    “Chronic pancreatitis is a disabling disease that results in constant, unremitting pain” said Michael Hughes Jr., M.D., transplant surgeon, Jewish Hospital, and assistant professor of surgery at UofL, and a surgeon with University of Louisville Physicians. “Until now, we have been unable to safely perform these procedures. Islet cell auto-transplant immediately following total pancreatectomy allows us to do this.”

    “Complete removal of the pancreas leads to diabetes due to loss of insulin-producing islet cells,” said Balamurugan Appakalai, Ph.D., known as “Dr. Bala,” an associate professor of surgery, director, Clinical Islet Cell Laboratory at UofL and an investigator with the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute. “Islet cell auto-transplantation is a clinical procedure that is performed to prevent diabetes or reduce the severity of diabetes after removal of the pancreas. After pancreatic tissue is removed during surgery, insulin-producing islet cells are immediately separated from the pancreas in a special cleanroom facility. These islet cells are then infused into the patient's liver and the islet cells continue to produce insulin to control blood sugar levels in the body.”

    Most patients who have had total pancreatectomy with islet auto-transplantation find a dramatic lessening of abdominal pain, reduction in the use of narcotic pain medicine and improved blood sugar control. Since the process involves the re-implantation of the patient’s own cells, the patient does not have to take immunosuppressive medication to ensure the viability of the treatment.

    According to Hughes, in addition to helping patients with chronic pancreatitis, the auto-transplantation of pancreas islet cells has the potential to impact people with type 1 diabetes. The techniques and skills acquired in auto-transplantation may be applied to patients with diabetes in the future.

    The Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence grant has funded the creation of the islet cell auto-transplant program at Jewish Hospital. The Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence provides financial assistance to not-for-profit organizations offering programs focused on Jewish culture/identity, health, human services and education.

    “We are grateful to the Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence for its support of Jewish Hospital’s islet cell auto-transplantation program,” said Joe Gilene, president, Jewish Hospital and downtown market leader. “We are among a select group of medical centers in the world undertaking this work that will benefit our patients and help us to become a regional leader in the treatment of pancreatitis.”

    “Pioneering the latest treatments in diseases and conditions is one of the primary goals of the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center,” said David L. Dunn, M.D., Ph.D., executive vice president for health affairs at the University of Louisville. “We know that chronic pancreatitis results in more than 122,000 outpatient visits and more than 56,000 hospitalizations per year nationwide. As the only health care provider in the Commonwealth offering islet auto-transplantation, we can drastically reduce the pain and suffering experienced by Kentuckians with chronic pancreatitis.”

    Referring physicians or patients with chronic pancreatitis can learn more about the procedure by calling 502-407-3220.

     

    About KentuckyOne Health

    KentuckyOne Health, the largest and most comprehensive health system in the Commonwealth, has more than 200 locations including, hospitals, physician groups, clinics, primary care centers, specialty institutes and home health agencies in Kentucky and southern Indiana. KentuckyOne Health is dedicated to bringing wellness, healing and hope to all, including the underserved.  The system is made up of the former Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare and Saint Joseph Health System, along with the the University of Louisville Hospital and James Graham Brown Cancer Center. KentuckyOne Health is proud of and strengthened by its Catholic, Jewish and academic heritages.

    About the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center

    The University of Louisville Health Sciences Center is the city’s only academic health center. Approximately 1,000 faculty members are involved in education, research and clinical care. The UofL HSC is home to more than 650 medical and dental residents, 3,000 students pursuing degrees in health-related fields within the Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing and Public Health and Information Sciences, as well as 14 interdisciplinary centers and institutes. Approximately $140 million in extramural funding enables researchers to uncover the causes of disease and better ways to prevent, treat and cure those diseases. Patients are seen at the Ambulatory Care Building, The James Graham Brown Cancer Center, the UofL Physicians Outpatient Center, Norton Children’s Hospital and University of Louisville Hospital.

    About University of Louisville Physicians

    University of Louisville Physiciansisthe largest multispecialty physician practice in the Louisville region, with nearly 600 primary care and specialty physicians in more than 78 specialties and subspecialties. Our doctors are the professors and researchers of the University of Louisville School of Medicine, teaching tomorrow’s physicians and leading research into medical advancements. For more information, visit www.uoflphysicians.com

    Sept. 30, 2015

    Appalakai Balamurugan

    Appalakai Balamurugan
    Full-size image:1.66 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Michael Hughes

    Michael Hughes
    Full-size image:211 KB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Michael Hughes

    Michael Hughes
    Full-size image:211 KB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    UofL Health Sciences Center holds first ‘Thank A Donor Day’ Oct. 14

    UofL Health Sciences Center holds first ‘Thank A Donor Day’ Oct. 14

    The University of Louisville Health Sciences Center will show appreciation to supporters who have provided donations to the institution in the inaugural “Thank A Donor Day” event on Wednesday, Oct. 14. The celebration will be held 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the HSC Quad, located on South Preston Street between Kornhauser Library and the HSC Instructional Building.

    Students, faculty and staff will sign a large sign at the event expressing thanks to donors. They also will create video and photo messages of gratitude, said Eileen Chapoton, UofL director of donor relations. These messages will be shared with donors throughout the coming year. They and the public also can share messages of thanks and follow news of the day’s events on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #UofLThanks.

    The messages will show appreciation for all types of support provided to the HSC: endowed chairs and professorships, scholarships, funding for research and facilities, sponsorships and other donations to student, faculty and staff groups, and more.

    “Thank a Donor Day gives the University of Louisville community an opportunity to publicly thank our many benefactors,” Chapoton said.  “As funding from public sources has decreased over the past decade, private donations now and in the future are critical for UofL if we are to be competitive in attracting the finest students, faculty and staff.”

    An identical “Thanks A Donor Day” event will be held in the Humanities Quad on UofL’s Belknap Campus on Tuesday, Oct. 13, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. For details on both events, contact 502-852-5064 or visit the Thank A Donor Day website.

     

    Oct. 1, 2015

     

     

     

    National aging expert comes to UofL Oct. 8 to challenge perceptions of growing older

    National aging expert comes to UofL Oct. 8 to challenge perceptions of growing older

    Bill Thomas, M.D.

    A national expert known for “disruptive aging” will challenge perceptions about getting older in an Aging Reconsidered Workshop addressing “Louisville’s Aging Revolution: Becoming an Age-Friendly City.” The one-day event will be held at the Brown & Williamson Club of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium, Thursday, Oct. 8 from 2:30 to 4 p.m.

    The event is free to the public and hosted by the University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging. Reservations are requested at ann.burke@louisville.edu.

    This event is part of Bill Thomas’ national Age of Disruption2015 Tour. A medical doctor, Thomas is traveling to multiple states throughout the southeastern United States to spread what he terms his highly disruptive understanding of aging with the mission to inspire positive change for the communities he reaches. In Louisville, Thomas will be featured in four events throughout the day of Oct. 8; another event in Louisville includes a “non-fiction” theatrical performance at the Kentucky Center for the Preforming Arts at 7 p.m.

    At the afternoon workshop, participants will learn how to challenge community leaders and members to have a voice and to take charge in making changes to better support livable aging. The afternoon forum will feature a dialogue about age-friendly cities, with participants sharing expectations of what an age-friendly city looks like. The community will be invited to engage with Thomas to develop an action plan in the development of an age-friendly city map for Louisville and surrounding communities.

    Thomas’ presentation will be followed by a panel discussion of area aging leaders who have been identified by the institute as community change agents. Panelists include:

    • Keith Knapp, President/CEO, Christian Care Communities
    • Keisha Deonarine, Economic Development Manager, Louisville Forward: Lifelong Wellness & Aging Care
    • Barbara Gordon, Executive Director, KIPDA
    • Hannah Ruggles, Western Kentucky University student

    “Thomas’ message is invigoratingly simple – the transition into our elder years should not be spent in frenzied disharmony,” said Anna Faul, D.Litt., director of the institute. “To successfully ‘play life’s most dangerous game’ – aging – we need to reimagine and create a clear and satisfying purpose to how we spend the rest of our lives.”

    “Everything we think we know about getting older is wrong,” said Thomas, a Harvard-educated physician and author of the book Second Wind: Navigating the Passage to a Slower, Deeper, and More Connected Life. “It’s time we shake ourselves out of the misery of aging and repurpose and restore the wonders and integrity of the second half of life.”

    For more information about the Aging Reconsidered Workshop and the Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging, call 502-852-5629.

    Alzheimer’s disease focus of UofL lecture Oct. 14

    Alzheimer’s disease focus of UofL lecture Oct. 14

    Benjamin Mast, Ph.D.

    The Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging at the University of Louisville continues its Optimal Aging Lecture Series with “Understanding the Person with Alzheimer’s Disease: Person-Centered Perspectives on Dementia Care,” Wednesday, Oct. 14. The lecture will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the University Club, 200 E. Brandeis Ave.

    Benjamin Mast, Ph.D., associate professor in the UofL Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, will debunk stereotypical thinking about Alzheimer’s disease and dementia and discuss ways in which “person-centered care” can help improve the quality of life of people with these conditions.

    Person-centered care aims to see the person with dementia as an individual, rather than focusing on the illness or abilities lost due to disease. This lecture explores the principles of person-centered assessment and care and how these apply to the individual and their unique experiences of living with dementia.

    Admission is $17 per person and includes lunch. Reservations are required online. For information, call 502-852-8953 or email ann.burke@louisville.edu.

    Latest treatments for depression discussed Oct. 15

    Building Hope Lecture Series features UofL Depression Center director
    Latest treatments for depression discussed Oct. 15

    Jesse Wright, M.D., Ph.D.

    “What Works for Depression” will be presented at the next “Building Hope” lecture sponsored by the University of Louisville Depression Center. Speaking will be Jesse H. Wright, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Depression Center and professor and vice chair for academic affairs of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the UofL School of Medicine.

    The program will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 15, in Room 251 of Second Presbyterian Church, 3701 Old Brownsboro Rd. Admission is free.

    The program will examine the most effective methods for treating clinical depression, including effective treatment methods for people who find themselves stuck in a depressive state. Wright also will answer audience members’ questions about treatment for depression.

    Recent research indicates clinical depression is a topic Kentuckians are familiar with, either from firsthand experience or through a family member or friend. A 2014 study found that Kentucky is ranked third in the United States for incidence of depression, with 23.5 percent of adult Kentuckians experiencing depression at some point during their lives, compared to 18 percent nationally.

    Wright is well-known in the psychiatric profession as an authority on depression and cognitive behavioral therapy. He has authored award-winning books for both mental health professionals and the general public, the most recent being “Breaking Free from Depression: Pathways to Wellness.” He was founding president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, is a Fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists and is a past recipient of UofL’s Distinguished Educator of the Year Award.

    The University of Louisville Depression Center is Kentuckiana’s leading resource for depression and bipolar disorder treatment, research and education. It is a charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, a consortium of leading depression centers that develops and fosters connections among members to advance scientific discovery and provide stigma-free, evidence-based care to patients with depressive and bipolar illnesses.

    For more information, contact the Depression Center at 502-588-4450.

     

     

    Finding the right stuff

    Research!Louisville keynoter to discuss how the Law of the Few can lead to improved health
    Finding the right stuff

    Clay Marsh, M.D.

    To effectively improve the health of people and the delivery of health care, you don’t need everything – just the right things.

    That is the premise behind the keynote address at Research!Louisville, to be presented at 1 p.m., Friday, Oct. 30, by Clay B. Marsh, M.D., vice president and executive dean of health sciences at West Virginia University. Admission is free to the event which will be held in Rooms 101/102 of the Kosair Charities Clinical & Translational Research Building at the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, 505 S. Hancock St.

    Celebrating its 20th anniversary, Research!Louisville is an annual conference that highlights research conducted by the institutions in the Louisville Medical Center. Research!Louisville will be held Oct. 27-30 in several locations in the medical center area.

    Marsh will present “Leveraging Nature to Create an Anti-Fragile Health Care System: From Black Swans to the Marines.” His address will focus on issues uncovered in the asymmetry found in complex systems, or as author Malcolm Gladwell postulated in his 2002 book The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, the Law of the Few.

    Gladwell noted that achieving a result – such as making something go viral – requires “connectors,” or people who know many others; “mavens,” people who know the best things; and “salespeople,” people who try things first. With the right grouping of connectors, mavens and salespeople, you don’t need to involve everyone, just the “right” ones to achieve your result.

    “This Law of the Few extends to all systems in nature,” Marsh said. “Only a few elements out of many are most important. In health, for example, although a complex series of events define every individual’s health status, one very simple approach is to examine the natural process that makes each of us less healthy: aging.

    “In this paradigm, the things that indicate a lower biological age improve health. Things that indicate an elevated biological age decrease health.” From that perspective, Marsh said, we can identify those behaviors and activities that foster health and wellness.

    Marsh will discuss how the Law of the Few also can help lead to novel designs in new health care systems that both learn from and meet the needs of people. Health care providers are advised to create systems that embrace and benefit from volatility, and change the model of care from an emphasis on disease to one on health.

    “By identifying the key elements that identify health – what it means to be a healthy person – we begin to know how to create the social systems needed to nudge behavior to health and measure it at a personal level,” he said.

    Research!Louisville is sponsored by the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, University of Louisville Hospital/KentuckyOne Health, Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation/KentuckyOne Health and Norton Healthcare.

    For the full schedule of presentations, go www.researchlouisville.org.

    UofL School of Medicine professor to deliver talk as ACC Distinguished Lecturer

    UofL School of Medicine professor to deliver talk as ACC Distinguished Lecturer

    Maureen McCall, Ph.D.

    As the Louisville Cardinals and the Florida State Seminoles prepare to face off on the football field Saturday, the two universities will come together in a different type of exchange in the lecture hall.

    As part of the ACC Distinguished Lecture Series, University of Louisville School of Medicine Professor Maureen A. McCall, Ph.D., will give a public lecture at the FSU College of Medicine on the impact of eye disease, the search for therapies and the challenges in curing blindness.

    The lecture will take place Friday, Oct. 16, at 2 p.m. in the Durell Peaden Auditorium & Atrium, 1115 W. Call St. in Tallahassee, Fla. The FSU graduate program in neuroscience is hosting the event. A reception will immediately follow the lecture.

    McCall holds joint appointments as professor in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology and Psychological and Brain Sciences. She came to UofL in 1997.

    In August, McCall was named chair of the 20-member Neurotransporters, Receptors and Calcium Signaling Study Section of the Center for Scientific Review of the National Institutes of Health. The panel reviews research grant applications, helping determine which are worthy of NIH support. She is the only Kentuckian on the panel, which has representatives from universities in 14 states

    The author of approximately 60 journal articles, McCall uses electrophysiological techniques in her research to evaluate normal retinal function, dysfunction caused by blinding retinal diseases, and the restoration of function using a variety of therapeutic strategies. Particular areas of emphasis are in the study of retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma and congenital stationary night blindness.

    Each year, outstanding faculty members from ACC schools are chosen to be ACC Distinguished Lecturers. These scholars are invited to make special presentations by other ACC universities.

    Honored as current ACC Distinguished Lecturers are Anthony Atala, Wake Forest University; Gregory Boebinger, Florida State University; Rory Cooper, University of Pittsburgh; Stefan Duma, Virginia Tech;  Rob Dunn, North Carolina State; Robin Fleming, Boston College; Peter Holland, Notre Dame; Eric Johnson, Clemson University; Neil Johnson, University of Miami, and McCall.

    Each has been identified as an excellent speaker with a strong capacity for catalyzing creative thinking and collaboration. In addition to an award stipend, the ACC Academic Consortium provides financial support to enable each of our 15 universities to sponsor a “distinguished lecture event” involving one of the lecturers on their campuses.  Lectures are to be scheduled during the 2015-16 and 2016-17 academic years.  More information can be obtained from brown@wfu.edu.

    Casey named chair of psychiatry, behavioral sciences at UofL

    Casey named chair of psychiatry, behavioral sciences at UofL

    David Casey, M.D.

    David A. Casey, M.D., has been named chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He has served as interim chair since Jan. 1.

    “The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at UofL is known for its robust program in academic psychiatry across all areas of education, research and clinical care,” said Toni Ganzel, M.D., MBA, dean of the UofL School of Medicine. “We are fortunate to have Dr. Casey’s expertise in leading the department to continued growth.”

    Casey, a professor in the department, has served as senior vice chair and head of clinical services, charged with oversight of the patient care activities of the department. Previously, he was director of the geriatric psychiatric program and he practices as a geriatric psychiatrist with University of Louisville Physicians. He joined the faculty in 1985.

    In addition to his clinical service, Casey trains psychiatry residents on topics such as psychodynamic psychotherapy, psychopathology and administrative psychiatry. His interests include Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, geriatric depression, psychiatric education and the history of psychiatry, on which he has lectured and published. He also serves as an editor of Psychiatrists In-Practice Examinationof the American College of Psychiatrists, an evaluation tool that provides comprehensive self-assessment of professional skills for practicing psychiatrists.

    Casey received his undergraduate degree in biology with honors and his medical degree, summa cum laude, from the University of Louisville.  He completed his psychiatric residency training at the University of Washington School of Medicine where he served as chief resident. He earned board certification in general psychiatry in 1988 and in geriatric psychiatry in 1991.

    Casey’s appointment was approved by the UofL Board of Trustees at its Oct. 8 meeting.

    New UofL chair for pathology

    New UofL chair for pathology

    Eyas Hattab, M.D.

    Eyas Hattab, M.D., M.B.A, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and neurological surgery at Indiana University School of Medicine, will be appointed as the new chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. Toni Ganzel, M.D., M.B.A., dean of the UofL School of Medicine, said that Hattab’s appointment will begin Jan. 1, 2016.

    “We are very excited to have a physician researcher and leader of the caliber of Dr. Hattab join us at the University of Louisville School of Medicine,” Ganzel said. “He brings with him extensive experience as a clinician, educator, researcher and leader that will enable us to continue our upward trajectory as a premier metropolitan research institution.”

    Hattab is currently the vice chair of education for pathology and laboratory medicine at Indiana University and serves as the director of the residency program. He joined Indiana University in 2002 and has risen through the ranks during the past 13 years.

    Hattab earned his medical degree from Jordan University of Science and Technology in Irbid, Jordan. He completed his residency in combined anatomic and clinical pathology at the University of Florida Health Science Center – Jacksonville, where he also served as chief resident. He then performed a fellowship in neuropathology at Stanford University Medical Center and surgical pathology fellowship at Washington University Medical Center in St. Louis.

    Hattab also earned his Business of Medicine M.B.A. from Indiana University Kelley School of Business.

    With a research interest in the diseases and abnormalities of the central nervous system, Hattab has authored more than 80 scientific writings and has been an invited speaker at highly prestigious national and international meetings. He is a member of the editorial board of the journal Modern Pathology and reviewer of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Consensus Committee on Quality Systems and Laboratory Practices. Hattab is an active member of the neuropathology community and serves on several national committees governing the field, including chairing the College of American Pathologists Neuropathology Committee, the CAP Cancer Biomarker Reporting Committee (CBRC) CNS panel and the Lower Grade Gliomas Disease Working Group of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, the National Cancer Institute.

     

    UofL School of Medicine transforms medical education program

    Accrediting body lifts probationary status
    UofL School of Medicine transforms medical education program

    Toni Ganzel, M.D., M.B.A.

    Having transformed the curriculum and the educational space in which it is delivered, the University of Louisville School of Medicine was notified by phone yesterday by its accrediting entity that it is in compliance with all educational standards and probationary status has been lifted. UofL anticipates receiving the detailed written report in the coming weeks.

    “During the past two years, we have worked diligently to address the concerns raised by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME),” said Toni Ganzel, MD, MBA, dean of the UofL School of Medicine. “We reformed our preclinical curriculum from a discipline-based model to an integrated model with more active learning and engaged pedagogies. We completed a major renovation of our instructional building, implemented new educational technologies and strengthened our educational governance and organizational structure.

    “We continue our efforts to assure that we consistently meet or exceed expectations for compliance with LCME standards.”

    UofL began implementing a redesigned curriculum in 2011, but significantly increased the speed during the past few years. Separate courses have been integrated to create a better fundamental understanding of the way the human body works in health and disease, and to link all of the courses throughout the four-year program. The faculty and students now are more focused on teamwork, communication, and application of knowledge using enhanced teaching technology and methods to take better care of patients.

    The most visible change at the school is the $7.5 million renovation of the instructional building that redesigned the school’s instructional space that opened in 1970, including two large interactive lecture halls that will better meet the needs of current class size and enable UofL to potentially expand its class size to meet the growing physician shortage in Kentucky and beyond. There also are new small group learning labs and classrooms, a new student lounge and expanded student study areas. Additionally, the infrastructure was upgraded to better support innovative, cutting edge academic technologies.

     

    October 16, 2015

    UofL researchers awarded patents for innovations to improve cancer treatments, bone grafts and therapies for spinal cord damage

    UofL researchers awarded patents for innovations to improve cancer treatments, bone grafts and therapies for spinal cord damage

    Trabs, particles used in Trabexus EB bone graft material

    Technologies to improve bone grafts and cancer immunotherapies, protect lung tissue during radiation treatment, reverse neurological damage and improve recovery from spinal cord injury are among the patents issued to the University of Louisville Research Foundation recently. Two of the inventions have been licensed and are in the process of making their way into the health-care system to improve the lives of patients.

    Bone graft cement - A substitute bone graft material called Trabexus EB has been patented and cleared by the FDA for use by orthopaedic surgeons in patient care. The product, developed by Michael Voor, Ph.D., associate professor of orthopaedic surgery and bioengineering at UofL, along with Robert Burden, M. Eng., a former student and employee of the Orthopaedic Bioengineering Lab, is a bone replacement cement that provides both strength and resorbability in bone repairs. Licensed and marketed by Vivorte, Trabexus EB contains specially shaped bone particles, called Trabs, which interconnect to provide a biologically active framework for the bone repair. The specially formulated calcium phosphate that binds the particles together allows the material to flow into irregular void spaces then provides strength while allowing the body to resorb the material and replace it with living bone. Trabexus EB is used by orthopaedic surgeons in repairing bones damaged through injury, tumor or other defects.

    Revolutionary treatment for paralysis - A three-pronged approach to the treatment of paralysis following spinal cord injury has received a patent based on the research of Susan Harkema, Ph.D., and Claudia Angeli, Ph.D., of UofL’s Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, along with researchers at UCLA and elsewhere. The treatment method centers on the use of epidural stimulation to activate the spinal cord, along with physical training and medications that when combined, allow individuals with spinal cord injury to have voluntary control of body movements and improve heart, lung and other autonomic functions. To activate the spinal circuits, an electrode array, controlled by the patient, is implanted in the lower spine. Participants in epidural stimulation research at UofL have experienced the ability to move and stand unassisted with some improvements in heart, pulmonary and bladder function.

    Cancer therapy improvement - Haval Shirwan, Ph.D., endowed chair and professor in UofL’s Institute for Cellular Therapeutics, along with Esma Yolcu, Ph.D., of UofL and Kutlu Elpek, Ph.D., now of Boston, have developed a method of using a series of ligands, molecules that bind to cell receptors, to enhance immunotherapies used for the treatment of cancer and chronic viral infections, such as HIV. When diseases such as cancer and HIV have overcome the patient’s immune system, the T cells, which provide a natural immune response, are “switched off.” The patented compositions utilize specific ligands in combination with antigens or infectious agents to reactivate and generate new T cells, allowing the patient’s immune system to respond more vigorously in eliminating the tumors or disease and preventing recurrence. This method of stimulating the immune system has significant potential to make immunotherapies more effective and provide protection against recurrence of the disease.

    Protecting lung function - Software to detect areas of depleted lung function during radiation treatment for lung cancer is the subject of a patent based on the work of Shiao Woo, M.D., chair, and Neal Dunlap, M.D., assistant professor of radiation oncology at UofL, along with Amir Amini, Ph.D., professor and endowed chair in bioimaging at UofL’s J.B. Speed School of Engineering, and Mohammadrezza Negahdar, Ph.D., now at Stanford University. The group developed 4-D computed tomography (CT) image analysis software that can be incorporated into existing lung imaging used during radiation therapy to detect early changes in lung elasticity. If specific areas of the lung have been damaged by radiation, the treatments can be adjusted to prevent permanent breathing problems. The process also may be used in other lung diseases, such as fibrosis, to detect early changes in lung function.

    Repairing the spinal cord - Fred Roisen, Ph.D., former chair of the UofL Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, along with UofL researchers Meng Qiu, Ph.D., and Chengliang Lu, M.D., and UofL graduate Meng Wang, Ph.D., developed a method for a tissue biopsy from a patient’s nasal passages and from those cells, isolating progenitor stem cells called RhinoCytes. These RhinoCtyes regenerate the spinal cord to repair an injury. The stem cells also can be used in the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. The method of generating the RhinoCytes has been licensed from UofL by RhinoCyte, Inc., and is scheduled for a concept study at the University of Louisville Hospital with Phase I/II clinical trials beginning in 2016.

    These patents have been awarded to the University of Louisville Research Foundation, Inc., in the current fiscal year, which began in July, 2015, according to the office of Technology Transfer & Industry Engagement. That office works with UofL researchers to submit patent applications and negotiates commercialization opportunities for patented technologies. The university received 60 U.S. patents in the past two fiscal years, half of which are related to medical research at the School of Medicine. The Speed School of Engineering is responsible for most of the other patent applications.

    UofL is the only university with three of the most prestigious innovation-associated commercialization grants, having received grants from the Coulter Translational Research Partnership, the National Science Foundation’s I-Corps and the National Institutes of Health Research Evaluation and Commercialization Hub (REACH).

     

    October 19, 2015

    History and future of vaccines the topic of next Beer with a Scientist Oct. 28

    What was the world like before vaccines, and what would happen without them now?
    History and future of vaccines the topic of next Beer with a Scientist Oct. 28

    Ruth Carrico, Ph.D., R.N.

    At the next Beer with a Scientist event, Ruth Carrico, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor of medicine at the University of Louisville and the associate founding director of the Global Health Initiative, will discuss life before vaccines, what life would be like without them now and what we can expect in the future. This month’s event is held in conjunction with Research!Louisville.

    “We will focus on the history of infectious diseases and their impact on society as well as what vaccines have done for us in terms of health and disease prevention. The emphasis will be on smallpox, polio, flu, childhood diseases and pneumonia,” said Carrico, who also is a family nurse practitioner, a fellow of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and clinical director of the Vaccine and International Travel Center.

    The program begins at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, October 28 at Against the Grain Brewery, 401 E. Main St. A 30-minute presentation will be followed by an informal Q&A session. The timing coincides with the 20th annual Research!Louisville conference, taking place October 27-30 throughout the city.

    The Beer with a Scientist program began in 2014 and is the brainchild of UofL cancer researcher Levi Beverly, Ph.D. Once a month, the public is invited to enjoy exactly what the title promises:  beer and science.

    Admission is free. Purchase of beer, other beverages or menu items is not required but is encouraged.

    Organizers add that they also encourage Beer with a Scientist patrons to drink responsibly.

    For more information and to suggest future Beer with a Scientist topics, follow Louisville Underground Science on Facebook.

    Research!Louisville, an annual conference that highlights research conducted by the institutions in the Louisville Medical Center, is sponsored by the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, University of Louisville Hospital/KentuckyOne Health, Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s Foundation/KentuckyOne Health and Norton Healthcare. For the full schedule of presentations, go www.researchlouisville.org.


    October 19, 2015

    LMPD officers train to save lives at UofL

    Willed Body Program provides resources to help officers learn to stop arterial bleeding
    LMPD officers train to save lives at UofL

    Police officers are often first on the scene when someone receives a serious injury. For victims with arterial bleeding, every second that passes puts them at greater risk of dying from their injuries. If emergency medical personnel cannot get there in time, it could be up to the police officer to save an individual’s life.

    Thanks to the University of Louisville’s Willed Body Program, 16 Louisville police officers received special training this month in how to stop arterial bleeding – and potentially save a life. At the fresh tissue lab in the UofL Department of Anatomical Sciences & Neurobiology, members of the Louisville Metro Police Department participated in a day-long session to learn how to handle life-threatening arterial bleeds they may encounter at an accident or crime scene.

    Emergency Medical Technician Brandon Heming and other emergency medical personnel instructed the officers using cadavers made available in the lab. It was the first such training held at the UofL lab for police officers.

    “We are teaching police officers to save lives. No other form of training allows for the realism that is provided by utilizing a tissue lab,” Heming said.

    Joe Heitzman, LMPD officer and one of the organizers of the training, said this was the first time many of the officers had worked with cadavers.

    “The officers who were in the class had a great learning experience and a lot of them told me that the training was the first time they actually got to see how trauma affects our bodies and how to use a tourniquet correctly to save a life,” Heitzman said. “This was an opportunity that not many officers will ever get a chance at and they were excited about the lab.”

    Nicole Herring, Ph.D., director of the Fresh Tissue and Willed Body Programs at UofL, said this type of training is part of the mission of the program, which provides cadavers for medical training within the UofL Health Sciences Center, as well as health-care professional students from Spalding, Bellarmine and Sullivan Universities, and Army Medical Corps team members from Ft. Knox.

    “One of our primary goals for the Willed Body Program is not only to provide a resource for education for our medical and dental students, but for health-care professionals in our community as well,” Herring said.


    October 20, 2015

    Annual UofL Depression Center dinner spotlights ‘Psychiatry and the Movies’

    Annual UofL Depression Center dinner spotlights ‘Psychiatry and the Movies’

    Glen O. Gabbard, M.D.

    Tickets are still available for the University of Louisville Depression Center’s annual dinner on Friday, Nov. 6, featuring Glen O. Gabbard, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine, speaking on “Psychiatry and the Movies.”

    Cocktail hour gets underway at 6 p.m. with dinner to follow at the University Club, 200 E. Brandeis St. Admission is $125 per person with proceeds going to support the UofL Depression Center. For information on tickets, email carol.wahl@louisville.edu or call 502-588-4886.

    The University of Louisville Depression Center is Kentuckiana’s leading resource for depression and bipolar disorder treatment, research and education. It is a charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, a consortium of leading depression centers that develops and fosters connections among members to advance scientific discovery and provide stigma-free, evidence-based care to patients with depressive and bipolar illnesses.

    Gabbard is the author of more than 300 journal articles and 23 books. He is known for his works on psychoanalysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy, personality disorders, psychiatric evaluation of professionals and more.

    The son of professional actors turned a hobby of examining psychiatry in the movies into his first book on the subject and today has something few other psychiatrists can cite: his own listing on the Internet Movie Database. He is author of two books that examine how the profession is portrayed by filmmakers – Psychoanalysis and Film and Psychiatry and Cinema. A third book looks at one of the most dysfunctional families ever created in The Psychology of ‘The Sopranos’: Love, Death, Desire and Betrayal in America’s Favorite Gangster Family.

    While filmmakers continue to be fascinated by psychiatry, Gabbard said, they don’t always accurately portray the profession or its practitioners. Hollywood has mostly preferred distortion and stereotype over more true-to-life representations.

    “People don't make distinctions between what's reality and what's on the great silver screen,” Gabbard said in a New York Times interview.

    Yet inaccurate as such portraits are, they are also compelling. In the same interview, Gabbard recalled a 1980 encounter with a patient who wanted to introduce hugs into the therapy he provided. Why? She had just seen Ordinary People and the psychiatrist in the movie portrayed by Judd Hirsch hugged the patient played by Timothy Hutton. “It helped (Hutton’s character) a lot,” she said, so she was certain it should be part of her sessions with Gabbard.

    Occasionally however, he said, screenwriters and directors who tackle the subject of mental disorders and their treatments get it right. In Gabbard's view, The Sopranos is the best depiction of psychotherapy “ever to appear on film or television.” And A Beautiful Mind, director Ron Howard's award-winning drama chronicling the genius and the battle with schizophrenia of the mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr., who won the Nobel Prize for economics in 1994, is as accurate a portrait of the illness as Hollywood has produced.

    Yet most on-screen portrayals fall short, Gabbard said. “The technique depicted is … simplistic and similarly naïve about therapeutic change,” he wrote in an essay in Psychiatric Times.

    “While (psychiatrists) can commiserate with one another about the impact such depictions have on our public image and potential patients, we also can learn something about the image we project to those outside our field,” he said. “…no profession likes the way they’re depicted. We may actually take heart from the old Hollywood axiom that there’s no such thing as negative publicity.”

    Posted October 21, 2015

    'Noah and Dr. B'

    UofL business professor, wife with son facing serious illness start fund to help other families
    'Noah and Dr. B'

    Salvatore Bertolone Jr., M.D., talks with 16-year-old Noah as parents Geneva and Mike Barone look on.

    A University of Louisville College of Business professor and his wife have created a new fund to help families with children who are patients of the UofL Physicians-Pediatric Cancer and Blood Diseases clinic.

    Donations are being accepted by the fund which has been set up to help families pay for expenses not covered by insurance and to help improve the clinic’s ability to treat patients. Approximately $16,000 of the $50,000 goal the family has set has been raised thus far.

    The Dr.Salvatore Bertolone Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fund has been created by Michael Barone, Ph.D., professor of marketing, and his wife Geneva to assist families with children who are patients of Salvatore J. Bertolone Jr., M.D., and other physicians at the clinic. Bertolone is a specialist in pediatric cancer and blood diseases with UofL Physicians and chief clinical operations officer for subspecialties with the Department of Pediatrics at UofL.

    Nicknamed the “Noah and Dr. B” fund on Facebook and GoFundMe, the fund is named for Bertolone and the Barone’s 16-year-old son, who has been battling a rare brain disorder, inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT), since 2006. Bertolone has treated Noah since the family moved to Louisville from Iowa shortly after his diagnosis.

    IPTs are non-cancerous lesions that can affect organ systems but originate in the central nervous system. In Noah, the IPTs have attacked his brain stem, affecting his ability to move, speak, see and maintain balance.

    A variety of treatments were prescribed for Noah before Bertolone hit upon a chemotherapy-type drug known as Revlimid® (lenalidomide) and another chemotherapeutic agent, VP-16.

    “We kept looking, and then decided to try an anti-inflammatory,” Bertolone said. “Now, Noah is in school every day. He’s walking, and we hope he can keep his disease at bay.”

    “After these treatments, Noah saw improvement in just a week’s time,” said Geneva Barone. “His speech is better, his whole body is more mobile, and he has more energy.”

    “During the summer, he worked hard in physical therapy, and his balance, strength, endurance and ability to get around greatly improved,” Michael Barone said.

    Noah, who is a junior at North Oldham High School, said, “I believe that this disease has been a blessing in disguise because it has allowed me to have relationship with great people such as Dr. B and the others at the clinic.  The care I have received there has made me want to help other kids at the clinic and their families deal with their diseases.”

    Noah’s success as a patient of Bertolone’s inspired the family to give back. In December 2014, Michael and Geneva made an initial gift of $10,000 to start the Noah and Dr. B fund, which assists the families of Bertolone’s patients with expenses not associated with their treatment but are just as necessary.

    “We know not every family has the means for all the expenses associated with a serious illness of their child,” Michael Barone said. “The fund we have set up is designed to help with those ‘extras’ – gas money, transportation, meals – as well as medical-related expenses that aren’t covered by their health plan.” To date, the fund has been used by the clinic to purchase new infusion pumps used in treatment and to help some families with first-time prescription co-payments.

    “We’re looking forward to raising more funds and seeing those monies being used to help the clinic and families in more ways. We have just recently been selected a Kentucky Derby Marathon Charity and are looking for other ways to raise money for the fund. Bottom line, we just want the fund to help families have less to worry about,” he said. “They already have so much to worry about as it is.”

    “The fund that Noah’s family has set up is just so typical of that family,” Bertolone said. “They have seen the needs of the patients and the parents in the clinic, and they are just such loving, wonderful people.

    “In spite of this overwhelming disease that their son has, they look out and say, ‘What can we do for others who come here (to the clinic) and help make life a little better for them?’”

    For more information about this fund, visit the Noah and Dr. B page on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/NoahAndDrB, and to donate, go to www.gofundme.com/sqb554.

    Associate dean for research releases book on risks of arsenic exposure

    Associate dean for research releases book on risks of arsenic exposure

    J. Christopher States, Ph.D.

    University of Louisville School of Medicine’s associate dean for research has edited a new reference book covering the most current information on the health and environmental risks of arsenic exposure. J. Christopher States, Ph.D., vice chair for graduate education in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at UofL, is the editor of “Arsenic:  Exposure Sources, Health Risks, and Mechanisms of Toxicity,” scheduled for release November 2.

    Arsenic exposure has been linked to increased risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as several types of cancer, abnormal fetal development and even death from other chronic diseases in humans. Arsenic occurs naturally but also is used in the production of pesticides, herbicides and insecticides, leading to exposure through arsenic-containing drinking water and in some foods, particularly seafood and rice.

    Recent research, covered in the book, has produced more details about how arsenic affects the body and what levels of exposure are harmful. Scientists also are studying how an individual’s genetic makeup and exposure to other toxins or diseases can increase damage from arsenic exposure.

    “The issue of how to capitalize on these ideas and how to integrate research findings into models of human pathology is a very exciting topic that requires an updated book on arsenic as a toxicant,” States said.

    The book uses novel modeling techniques, population studies, experimental data and future perspectives to help readers understand the potential health risks and how research can improve and contribute to characterization and risk assessment of arsenic exposure. It was written to serve as a resource for toxicologists, risk assessors, epidemiologists, environmental chemists, medical scientists and other professionals and researchers in government, academia and industry.

    Arsenic:  Exposure Sources, Health Risks, and Mechanisms of Toxicity” is published by Wiley and will be released on November 2, 2015. It is currently available for preorder.

     

    October 27, 2015

    Bertolone receives Marc Lehmann Spirit of Service Award for patient care in pediatric oncology & hematology

    Bertolone receives Marc Lehmann Spirit of Service Award for patient care in pediatric oncology & hematology

    Salvatore J. Bertolone, Jr., M.D.

    Salvatore J. Bertolone, Jr., M.D., professor and previous chief of pediatric oncology and hematology at the University of Louisville, will receive the third annual Marc A. Lehmann Spirit of Service Award for physicians on Oct. 30. The award recognizes Louisville-area physicians in hematology & oncology and is presented in memory of Marc A. Lehmann, a Louisville native and UofL student who succumbed to acute myeloid leukemia in 2012.

    The Marc A. Lehmann Spirit of Service Award Foundation endeavors to seek out and identify physicians and support staff in the field of blood cancers and hematology to honor long-standing service to patients and their families that encompasses exceptional proficiency, empathy and understanding. Each year the foundation presents an award to one physician and to three support staff members from the Greater Louisville area.

    “I am humbled  by this award – humbled because all I have tried to do is simply what every physician has pledged to do in the Hippocratic Oath:  Remember that there is art to medicine as well as science and that warmth, sympathy and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drugs,” Bertolone said.

    Marc Lehmann was stricken with acute myeloid leukemia at age 18, while a student at UofL’s J.B. Speed School of Engineering. Marc endured an eight-year battle with AML, graft vs. host disease and numerous immunosuppressed blood‐borne infections. Following his death in 2012, his family and friends created the Marc A. Lehmann Spirit of Service Award Foundation to honor his memory and the many compassionate health-care workers Marc encountered during his journey.

    George J. Lehmann, III, Marc’s father and president and director of the foundation, said previous award recipients nominated Bertolone for the 2015 award. Committee members and directors then conferred with associates, fellow physicians and affected patients concerning Bertolone’s history of patient care.

    “Dr. Bertolone was found, by both the nominating committee and by the Foundation directors, to be a more than suitable nominee,” Lehmann said. “The more telling quality that this process reveals lies in the nearly countless stories and accolades provided by affected members of our community, both lay and physician, who enthusiastically endorse Dr. Bertolone's qualifications.”

    Along with one physician, awards are presented each year to one support staff member from each Baptist Health System, KentuckyOne Health and Norton Healthcare. The 2015 support staff recipients are Katherine Mitchell, A.P.R.N., A.O.C.N.P. (Baptist), Melissa Pritchett, B.S.N./O.C.N. (KentuckyOne) and Rebecca Champion, Pharm.D., B.C.O.P. (Norton). The 2015 awards will be presented at a dinner on Friday, Oct. 30 at Vincenzo’s Italian Restaurant.

     

    October 29, 2015

    New immunotherapy treatment may clear cancer-causing HPV infections faster

    Women with HPV 16, 18 infections needed for trial of therapeutic vaccine

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most frequently occurring cancer in women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in 99 percent of cervical cancers and is considered to be their cause. While most HPV infections will clear naturally within a few years, there has been no treatment available to hasten or improve the chance of natural eradication.

    A new therapeutic vaccine, GTL001, developed by Genticel to clear HPV strains 16 and 18 – the types most likely to cause cancer – is being evaluated for safety in a Phase I clinical trial at the University of Louisville. Unlike prophylactic vaccines, which prevent diseases, therapeutic vaccines fight diseases after an individual is infected in a process known as immunotherapy. Physicians at UofL are seeking women with these infections to participate.Although HPV infections are detected in a Pap smear, there has been no standard treatment to eradicate an infection other than hoping it will clear naturally and monitoring for the development of precancerous lesions. Thus, finding a treatment for HPV will be an important step in preventing cancer. Prophylactic vaccines can prevent some HPV infections, but they are not effective against existing infections.

    “While prophylactic vaccines such as Gardasil® are available for those who choose to use them, many women are not choosing to be vaccinated. In addition, most of the women in our population are older than the vaccine movement, so they may not have had the vaccine and may have acquired HPV infections,” said Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., chair of the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine at UofL and a professor of obstetrics and gynecology.

    Women age 25-65 who have been diagnosed with HPV 16 or HPV 18are needed to participate in a small Phase I tolerability clinical trial of GTL001 with only a three-month follow-up period. Participants must not have high-grade lesions (HSIL) as determined by Pap smear. In addition, participants must not have received an HPV vaccine and must not be pregnant or breastfeeding.

    Participants in the study will receive two injections at six-week intervals, as well as various tests and assessments. All study-related visits, tests and medications will be provided at no cost. In addition, participants may be reimbursed for travel expenses.

    Participants will be enrolled through early 2016. Current trial locations include Louisville, Philadelphia and Columbus, Ohio.

    Women who would like to participate in the trial may contact Angela Siegwald at angela.siegwald@louisville.edu or 502-852-2043.

     

    October 28, 2015

    UofL physician to participate in UN Day panel Saturday

    Mittel will discuss health consequences of human trafficking
    UofL physician to participate in UN Day panel Saturday

    Olivia Mittel, M.D.

    October 28, 2015

    Olivia Mittel, M.D., assistant dean for student affairs at the University of Louisville School of Medicine and assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, will be among an expert panel discussing human trafficking Saturday, Oct. 31. The event is part of the 70th United Nations Day Commemoration Conference, hosted by the Kentucky Division of the United Nations Association of the United States of America (UNA-USA).

    The event will kick off at 11 a.m. at the University Club Ballroom, 200 E. Brandeis Ave.

    At UofL, Mittel is among the team that educates and trains medical students and residents to recognize the signs of human trafficking in patients and to intervene on their behalf.

    In advance of the UN Day panel, Mittel shares the following statement:

    “It is well known that human trafficking victims suffer severe mental and physical health consequences as a result of their exploitation. Because they often require immediate attention for violence-related injuries, serious psychological illness, pregnancy and substance abuse, health care workers are likely to be the only professionals to interact with these victims while they are being trafficked.

    “For this reason, the University of Louisville School of Medicine, together with KentuckyOne Health, are committed to developing training protocols to teach our students, nurses and physicians how to identify these patients and refer them to safety.

    “By increasing our efforts to understand the nature and scope of the problem in our community, we can better intervene on behalf of these patients and ultimately play a vital role in the fight to eliminate modern-day slavery.”

    Mittel will be joined on the panel with Dianna Anderson, chair, Louisville Metro Human Trafficking Task Force; Amy Leenerts, founder and director, Free2Hope Inc.; and Jeanette Westbrook, UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.

    Other speakers during the UN Day program include Rep. John Yarmuth, District 10 Louisville Metro Councilman Steve Magre and lecturer Ambassador Shabazz. Speakers in the afternoon include Mike Beard, executive director of UN Foundation Advocacy and global health director of the Better World Campaign; and Karen Mulhauser, national chair, UNA-USA.

    For information, contact Teena Halbig, 502-267-6883 or teenahal@aol.com.

     

    Bolli to receive Schottenstein Prize for cardiovascular research from Ohio State University

    Bolli to receive Schottenstein Prize for cardiovascular research from Ohio State University

    Roberto Bolli, M.D.

    Roberto Bolli, M.D., chief of the University of Louisville’s Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, will receive the 2015 Jay and Jeannie Schottenstein Prize in Cardiovascular Sciences from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Heart and Vascular Center. The Schottenstein Prize is among the largest monetary prizes in the United States dedicated to cardiovascular research.

    “We congratulate Roberto for achieving this award. He is such a scientist,” said Thomas Ryan, M.D., director of the Ohio State Heart and Vascular Center. “His work on heart muscle protection and regeneration has greatly increased our understanding of the cellular changes that occur during a heart attack and how to minimize and repair the damage that results.”

    The Schottenstein Prize was established in 2008 with a $2 million gift from Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein for an endowed fund for a biennial award. The prize goes to a physician or researcher who is an international leader in cardiovascular medicine, cardiothoracic surgery or molecular or cellular cardiology. Bolli will receive his award during a ceremony on Nov. 4 in Columbus, Ohio. The prize includes an honorarium of $100,000.

    “I am deeply honored to be the recipient of this prestigious award. I would like to thank the leadership of the University of Louisville for their steadfast support of my research efforts over the past 20 years and all of the members of our research team for their outstanding work and dedication, which have made this recognition possible. The Schottenstein Prize recognizes all of them,” Bolli said. “This award will further strengthen our resolve to advance the research agenda of the University of Louisville, focusing on pioneering studies of new therapies such as the use of adult stem cells to regenerate heart muscle in patients with heart failure and to improve blood flow in patients with peripheral arterial disease.”

    Bolli is the Jewish Hospital Heart & Lung Institute Distinguished Chair in Cardiology and serves as director of UofL’s Institute of Molecular Cardiology, scientific director of the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute and executive vice chair in the Department of Medicine. He has conducted research on preventing damage caused during heart attacks by studying ischemic preconditioning, the phenomenon in which heart muscle exposed to brief periods of stress becomes resistant to the tissue death that might be caused by a heart attack.

    Previous biennial Schottenstein Prize winners include Garret FitzGerald, M.D., the McNeil Professor in Translational Medicine and Therapeutics at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Christine Seidman, M.D., professor in the Departments of Medicine and Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Pascal Goldschmidt, M.D., the senior vice president for medical affairs and dean at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

     

    October 29, 2015

    Optimal aging lecture provides practical legal information for seniors, Nov. 11

    October 28, 2015

    The Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging at the University of Louisville concludes its fall Optimal Aging Lecture Series with “Practical Legal Information for Seniors and Those Who Love Them,” Wednesday, Nov. 11. The lecture will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the University Club, 200 E. Brandeis Ave.

    Misty Clark Vantrease and Kelly Gannott, partners at Kentucky ElderLaw PLLC, will engage the audience on how to navigate the financial maze and challenges that aging poses for individuals and their families.

    The financial decisions of advancing age can be challenging for both individuals and their loved ones. Families who are faced with long-term care and increasing medical expenses can feel overwhelmed in managing the financial demands of this life-phase. This lecture will provide essential “financial caregiving” tips to help individuals and their families stay financially stable.

    The Institute’s Optimal Aging Lecture Series will resume in February for the spring season.

    Admission is $17 per person and includes lunch. Reservations are required online. For information, call 502-852-8953 or email ann.burke@louisville.edu.

    Kelly Gannott

    Kelly Gannott
    Kelly Gannott
    Full-size image:2.00 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    Misty Clark Vantrease

    Misty Clark Vantrease
    Misty Clark Vantrease
    Full-size image:1.60 MB | View imageViewDownload imageDownload

    New option may help age-related hearing loss

    UofL seeking trial participants for drug that may improve hearing in noisy environments
    New option may help age-related hearing loss

    New drug may help with age-related hearing loss

    Over the past 10 years, Tom Schlindwein noticed it gradually became more difficult to follow conversations in public places.

    “I have most difficulty in a restaurant or a venue where there is a lot of background noise,” Schlindwein said.

    The 69-year-old Schlindwein is not alone. Many people find that as they get older, they have difficulty understanding conversations in crowded rooms or when there is significant background noise. Although hearing aids can help, age-related hearing loss can result from not only reduced loudness of speech, but also changes in central auditory processing in the brain. Thus, even with a hearing aid, people may find that understanding speech in noise is a problem.

    “I have talked to people with hearing aids who say they do not work well in these situations,” Schlindwein said. “If there is an alternative, I am eager to pursue it.”

    Schlindwein is participating in a clinical trial being conducted by researchers at the University of Louisville Program in Audiology for an investigational medication, AUT00063. The drug was developed for adults with age-related hearing loss and difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments.

    Jill Preminger, Ph.D., chief of the Division of Communicative Disorders in the Department of Otolaryngology at UofL, is leading the trial of AUT00063, developed by Autifony Therapeutics. She said this medication, which focuses on improving brain-related aspects of age-related hearing loss, may be the first to help individuals with this condition.

    “There have been very few drug studies for age-related hearing loss, yet approximately 45 percent of people over the age of 45 have some degree of hearing loss,” Preminger said.

    Understanding speech involves distinguishing between similar sounds (such as p and b). These distinctions rely on not only reception by hair cells in the cochlea, which are lost with age, but on optimal function of auditory processing mechanisms in the brain.

    “This drug is not targeting an improvement in hearing thresholds (i.e. making things louder), rather it is targeting how sound is processed in the auditory areas of the brain. This may result in improved hearing in noise,” Preminger said.

    Coordinators are seeking additional individuals, age 50 to 89, with age-related hearing loss to participate in the trial.  Qualified individuals are those who experience difficulty understanding speech against high background noise but do not use hearing aids. Subjects accepted for the study will receive evaluations by an audiologist and physician and have a 50/50 chance of receiving the study medicine or placebo. Participation may last up to 10 weeks and include compensation.

    People who are interested in participating in this clinical trial may call 502-852-5251 or email michelle.bottorff@louisville.edu to see if they qualify. For more information on the study, go to Age Related Hearing Loss Clinical Trial.

     

    November 2, 2015

    UofL’s Trover Campus a national model in drawing physicians to rural practice

    UofL’s Trover Campus a national model in drawing physicians to rural practice

    William J. Crump, M.D.

    Although many rural residents who were previously uninsured now have health insurance thanks to the Affordable Care Act, a shortage of physicians in many rural communities means it still can be difficult for rural residents to obtain health care.

    The University of Louisville School of Medicine has been working to increase the number of physicians in rural communities by training doctors at Trover Campus at Baptist Health Madisonville for 17 years. William J. Crump, M.D., associate dean for the Trover Campus, and his colleagues at UofL have assembled data to demonstrate that their efforts are paying off. The physicians who spent the last two years of medical school at the rural location are much more likely to ultimately practice in a rural setting.

    In a study published online last week in The Journal of Rural Health, Crump reveals that 45 percent of the physicians who completed medical school at the rural campus now practice in rural areas, compared with only 7 percent of graduates who remained on the urban campus. The authors examined data for 1,120 physicians who graduated from the UofL School of Medicine between 2001 and 2008, including those who completed training at the traditional urban campus as well as Trover Campus. They used statistical methods to control for the percentage of graduates who had rural upbringing and chose family medicine, factors that previously were shown to predispose a physician to rural practice, and were able to demonstrate the rural campus itself added to the likelihood a physician would choose a rural practice.

    “We were able to show that the investment of resources in our campus over the past 17 years has made a real difference for our Commonwealth,” Crump said. “There are almost 20 other such small campuses that have been established recently around the country. It will be another 10 to 15 years before they are able to prove the outcomes that we have, but we are confident that they will find the same thing. Not only will physicians be placed into small towns, but the small towns that host these rural regional campuses will benefit greatly from the financial investment by the parent campus as well as potentially recruiting their graduates to make their own medical care better."

    Almost two-thirds of Kentucky’s counties are considered health professional shortage areas, meaning they have far too few primary care physicians. The University of Louisville focused on correcting this shortage by establishing the Trover Campus in Madisonville, Ky., a town of 20,000 that is 150 miles southwest of Louisville in the west Kentucky coal fields. It was believed that training students from small towns in a small town would more likely produce physicians for the small towns, and now this concept has been proven. Trover Campus was only the second in the United States to be placed in such a small town.


    November 6, 2015

    UofL psychiatry resident wins national fellowship

    Award provides for 10-month advocacy role with Congress
    UofL psychiatry resident wins national fellowship

    Daniel Jackson, M.D.

    A third-year resident in the University of Louisville Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences has been awarded the Jeanne Spurlock, M.D. Congressional Fellowship of the American Psychiatric Association and the association’s related organization, the American Psychiatric Foundation.

    Daniel T. Jackson, M.D., is serving in the Capitol Hill office of U.S. Rep. James McDermott, M.D. (D-Wash.) for the 10 months of the fellowship beginning in September. The award is offered to only one individual each year and provides the opportunity to represent the profession of psychiatry in Congress, working with federal policy makers to shape public policy.

    “My work with Rep. McDermott – who is a psychiatrist himself – focuses on mental health issues including the Mental Health Reform Act of 2015 in the Senate and the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2015 in the House,” Jackson said. “We hope to see action on one or both bills in the coming months.”

    Both bills propose to reform current mental health law to make available needed psychiatric, psychological and supportive services to individuals with mental illness and families in mental health crisis. The bills focus on providing more programs and resources to help those suffering from mental disorders.

     

    Jackson is a two-time graduate of UofL, earning his medical degree in 2013 and a bachelor of arts degree cum laude in psychology with concentration in the natural sciences in 2007. He entered the residency program in July 2013.

    As a resident, he lectures on substance abuse topics to third- and fourth-year medical students and sits on the UofL Psychiatry Residency Admission Committee. He also is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Kentucky Psychiatric Medical Association, Kentucky Medical Association and Greater Louisville Medical Society.

    He also has undertaken public policy advocacy work as a resident, attending the Advocacy Leadership Conference in Washington last year. There, he joined with others in the health care profession to recommend for increased federal investment through the National Institutes of Health, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Indian Health Service. He has lobbied for passage of the Ensuring Veteran’s Resiliency Act and helped efforts that were successful in reforming Medicare’s physician payment formula.

     

    UofL event prepares future health professionals to improve health equity

    The 10th annual Cultural Competency Day set for Nov. 10

    Among the most important issues facing health care are social barriers to care. To ensure future health professionals are equipped with the understanding to reduce health inequities, the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center Office of Diversity and Inclusion will hold its 10th annual Patricia Allen Cultural Competency Day on Tuesday, November 10. Nearly 700 students will participate in “Health Equity through Interprofessional Practice,”a day-long workshop that includes discussions on Poverty and Accessing Health Care, LGBT Health, Immigrant and Refugee Populations and Cultural Barriers in Health Care.

    Students from UofL Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, Public Health and Kent School of Social Work, as well as the Sullivan University School of Pharmacy and nurses with Passport Health Plan will take part in the program, to be held at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage (KCAAH).

    Vivian Lasley-Bibbs, the acting director for the Office of Health Equity in the Kentucky Department for Public Health, will open the event with a keynote address on the increasing racial, ethnic, cultural and linguistic diversity in the American population and the need for health-care practitioners to understand the socio-cultural background of their patients in order to deliver high quality health care.

    “This is the 10th year for this conference reflecting the Health Sciences Center’s commitment to health equity for all. In addition to this important milestone, the program has expanded to include almost 700 students from multiple health disciplines,” said V. Faye Jones, M.D., Ph.D., assistant vice president for health affairs – diversity initiatives. “We all have a role in achieving health equity, and this year’s program allows students to learn with and from each other in the community setting of the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage.”

    Attendees will be assigned to interprofessional teams that rotate together among 75-minute breakout sessions covering each topic. This format, which differs from previous years, will ensure that all attendees are exposed to each topic and will accommodate the large number of participants. The interprofessional teams, which mix students and residents from dentistry, speech pathology, pharmacy, social work, public health and medicine, allow the students to experience the topics from the unique perspectives of each field.

    UofL’s Cultural Competency Day was first held in 2006, the result of efforts by Jones and Patricia Allen, administrative associate for the Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program office at UofL, to improve cultural understanding of UofL Health Sciences Center students. Approximately 150 students attended the event its first year. The event is named for Allen, who helped lay the groundwork and planning for the event.

    November 9, 2015

    UofL medical education innovations showcased at national conference

    Programs addressing interprofessional education, human trafficking and emergency resuscitation team performance are highlighted at AAMC conference
    UofL medical education innovations showcased at national conference

    Monica Ann Shaw, M.D.

    Educators from the University of Louisville School of Medicine are sharing two successful programs with medical educators from around the nation today at the 2015 Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Medical Education Meeting. Two teams are delivering presentations at the Baltimore event, and an educational grant will be announced for an interdisciplinary training program for internal medicine residents.

    “The recent curriculum revision at the UofL School of Medicine has been a catalyst for multiple innovative approaches to medical education. We are committed to developing best practices in medical education and translating those practices to meet the needs of our immediate community by improving patient care,” said Monica Ann Shaw, M.D., M.A., vice dean for undergraduate medical education for the UofL School of Medicine. “I am very proud of the momentum we are gaining in educational scholarship and am proud of my colleagues and the University of Louisville’s presence at this national conference."

    Members of UofL’s Interdisciplinary Curriculum for Oncology Palliative Care Education (iCOPE) Council will detail the program for training medical, nursing, social work and chaplaincy students in interprofessional palliative care education. Presenters Shaw, Leslee Martin, M.A., director of medical education, and Susan Sawning, M.S.S.W., director of medical education research, will share the details of iCOPE, developed with a grant from the National Cancer Institute. Surveys of 758 students reveal the program significantly improves the students’ palliative care knowledge, skills and self-efficacy related to working in teams.

    In another session, Olivia Mittel, M.D., and Carrie Bohnert, M.P.A., are presenting a program that helps medical students learn to identify and assist victims of human trafficking. Mittel, assistant dean of student affairs, and Bohnert, director of the standardized patient program, developed a training unit for medical students that utilized a standardized patient encounter and an online learning module to teach the students to identify victims of human sex trafficking, communicate with suspected victims and refer victims to safety. This program addresses the fact that although 400,000 Americans are at risk for exploitation each year, only 10 percent of doctors will recognize trafficking victims.

    Finally, Lorrel Brown, M.D., associate director of UofL’s Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship Program, has been awarded a grant from the Southern Group on Educational Affairs for her curriculum that improves resuscitation effectiveness through team simulations. The program, called “Code Blue,” brings together internal medicine residents, nurses, respiratory therapists and pharmacy residents to learn as a team to respond more effectively in actual “code blue” events. The grant will be announced during the conference.

     


    November 12, 2015

    UofL post-doctoral fellow earns award from veterans’ group for top funding application

    UofL post-doctoral fellow earns award from veterans’ group for top funding application

    Lynnette Montgomery, Ph.D. receives Fritz Krauth Award from PVA

    University of Louisville researcher Lynnette Montgomery, Ph.D., has received the 2015 Fritz Krauth Memorial Fellowship Award from the Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA), for submitting the top scholarship application to the organization for the year. Earlier this year, Montgomery was awarded a two-year, $100,000 scholarship from the PVA for research she is conducting in the lab of Charles Hubscher, Ph.D., in the Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology.

    Montgomery, one of eight researchers who received grants from the PVA Research Foundation in 2015, is studying how activity-based rehabilitation can improve bladder function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Often, following SCI, the bladder produces excessive urine, a condition known as polyuria. This can lead to a high number of catheterizations, each of which increases the possibility of urinary complications.

    Preliminary work in Hubscher’s lab has shown that the hormone vasopressin decreases following spinal cord injury, causing an increase in the production of urine. Montgomery is working with rodent models to understand the mechanisms behind vasopressin reduction and hopes to determine whether exercise and medication aimed at increasing vasopressin levels will alleviate polyuria following SCI.

    “It’s an exciting area of research and it is very under studied,” Montgomery said. “Bladder control is one of the top quality-of-life issues for spinal cord injury patients. If a patient has to use a catheter four times a day instead of six, or is able to sleep through the night instead of waking for catheterization, it makes a big difference in quality of life.”

    The Krauth Fellowship is named for Fritz Krauth, a Navy veteran who incurred a spinal cord injury as a naval aviator. Prior to his death in 2002, Krauth provided a gift to PVA to support research initiatives through the PVA Research Foundation. The foundation provides grants that will lead to improved understanding and treatment of spinal cord injury and disease. The researcher submitting the top fellowship application to the PVA each year is honored with the Fritz Krauth Memorial Fellowship Award.

    “Paralyzed Veterans of America is dedicated to advancing research for spinal cord injury and dysfunction and supporting leading medical experts such as Dr. Montgomery. Her breakthrough findings will improve the life of veterans and every person living with SCI. It will also ensure they have the means to pursue a life undefined by disability,” said Sherman Gillums, Jr., deputy executive director of PVA.

    A native of Australia, Montgomery came to the University of Louisville in 2013 to join Hubscher’s lab. Hubscher was recently awarded continued funding from the Department of Defense.

    “The translational research studies being conducted in our laboratory address the areas of highest priority and utmost importance for the spinal cord injured population, bladder and sexual function,” Hubscher said. “The award from the Paralyzed Veterans of America and continued funding from the Department of Defense will allow us to address multiple questions regarding potential underlying mechanisms for the benefits of activity-based rehabilitation on urogenital function after spinal cord injury.”

     

    About Paralyzed Veterans of America

    Paralyzed Veterans of America is a congressionally chartered veterans service organization dedicated solely for the benefit and representation of veterans with spinal cord injury or disease. For nearly 70 years, PVA has ensured that veterans have received the benefits earned through their service to our nation, monitored their care in VA spinal cord injury units and funded research and education in the search for a cure and improved care for individuals with paralysis. In addition, PVA develops career services, works to ensure accessibility in public buildings, provides health and rehabilitation opportunities through sports and recreation, and advocates for veterans and all people with disabilities.

     

    November 16, 2015

    What salamanders can teach us about baseball

    UofL researcher shows how amphibians use prediction to compensate for sensorimotor delays to connect with moving prey
    What salamanders can teach us about baseball

    Salamander catching a fly

    If a baseball player waits until he sees the ball arrive in front of him to swing his bat, he will miss miserably. By the time the batter sees the ball’s position, plans his swing and moves the bat, the ball will be firmly in the catcher’s mitt.

    This time lag is known as sensorimotor delay. University of Louisville researcher Bart Borghuis, Ph.D., has increased our understanding of how people and animals deal with this delay in day-to-day interactions by analyzing the hunting skills of salamanders. His article, The Role of Motion Extrapolation in Amphibian Prey Capture,” is published in today’s issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

    A skilled baseball player compensates for sensorimotor delay by predicting when the ball will cross the plate and starting his swing in time to meet it. Borghuis’ research reveals the salamander also predicts the future location of its prey as it catches moving fruit flies by projecting its long, sticky tongue.

    The sensorimotor delay is caused by the time it takes for the visual image to be processed by the retina, time to plan the motor action and time to activate the motion. When a salamander hopes to catch a moving fly, in the time it takes to make the strike – about 230 milliseconds – the fly will have moved from the location it was in when the salamander launched its attack. If the salamander sends its tongue to the location where it sees the fly, by the time the tongue gets there, the fly will be gone. Despite this delay, salamanders are efficient hunters, catching their prey more than 90 percent of the time in Borghuis’ experiments.

    Why are salamanders so effective in their attacks?

    Borghuis, assistant professor in the Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology at UofL, and Anthony Leonardo, Ph.D., of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, used high speed videography to capture 270 instances of salamanders striking at flies. Through analysis of the videos, Borghuis developed an algorithm that predicted where the salamander’s tongue would strike based on the fly’s path.

    The algorithm mimics the salamanders’ process using extrapolation to anticipate the prey’s position in the future based on its bearing and velocity. The salamanders’ tongue strikes were consistent with the algorithm, and were consistently successful – unless the fly changed course between the time the salamander initiated the attack and the time of the actual strike.

    In successful strikes, the salamander caught the fly by sending its tongue tip to the position where the fly was when the tongue arrived. When the salamanders missed, the salamander’s tongue struck the location where the fly would have been had it continued on the same path it had been following. However, in these cases, the fly had changed direction after the salamander launched its attack.

    “The misses confirmed the model,” Borghuis said. “This is the first demonstration that the salamanders were making a prediction.”

    The tongue struck where the fly never had been, yet would have been had the fly continued its previous course of motion. Thus the salamander was predicting where the fly would be at the time the tongue reached it based on the fly’s direction and speed.

    “This information adds to a small set of clear examples of how vertebrates – including humans – use prediction for dealing with delays in motor processing,” Borghuis said. “Now that we know how the salamander does this, we can further investigate the neuromechanisms that make this happen.”

    VIDEO

    The videos above show the researchers’ trajectory duplicating the salamander’s prediction of the location of the fly at the point of impact with the tongue. In the first video, the salamander successfully predicts the path and catches the fly. In the second video, the fly alters its direction after the salamander launches its strike, so the tongue misses the fly, hitting instead the location where the fly would have been had it not changed its course. The final video is a 4000 fps video showing a salamander striking a fruit fly. In real time, this motion would take about 1/5 of a second or 180 milliseconds.

    November 18, 2015

    files

    There are currently no items in this folder.

    Identical adult twins undergo first-of-its-kind procedure performed by UofL physician

    A woman who survived a rare childhood cancer successfully underwent a first-of-its-kind procedure with University of Louisville Physicians to help restore her appearance.

    Jarrod Little, M.D., a plastic and reconstructive surgeon with UofL Physicians, used fat grafted from Janna Coleman’s identical twin, Jessie, to reshape Janna’s face from the damaging effects of radiation and chemotherapy. While fat grafting has been done for years, there are no instances in medical literature of it taking place from one person to another, and never before on identical twins. While tissue from twins has been used for organ transplants, soft tissue procedures between twins are rare, Little said.

    The surgery took place at University of Louisville Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, over about three hours on Thursday, Nov. 19, and was a success.

    “It will make a huge difference for her,” Little said. “She looks like a new person. I’m very happy with the results.”

    Janna, 28, was diagnosed with an aggressive rhabdomyosarcoma at the age of 7. Childhood rhabdomyosarcoma is a disease in which malignant cells form in muscle tissue, and Janna’s formed behind her jaw. She was successfully treated, but the surgery, radiation and chemotherapy to her head and neck left lasting effects, damaging her pituitary gland, which disrupted her growth, most noticeably around her face. He jawbone never grew to an adult size.

    While Janna is an identical twin, her sister, Jessie, did not have the same condition. Though they once looked so much alike even their father had trouble telling them apart, after her treatment Janna no longer looked as much like her sister.

    “The cancer was the easy part; the aftermath is what’s been hard,” Janna said.

    Janna went through more than 10 reconstructive surgeries over the years to help, but without much success. After moving to Louisville and working as an oncology nurse, she heard of Little and went to him to see if there was anything else that could be done.

    With the jawbone in Janna's face damaged and stunted from radiation, Little determined reconstruction of her jaw was not an option. Fat grafting to help re-shape her face was, but Janna did not have enough fat, and was unable to gain weight because of her development issues.

    But when Little learned Janna was an identical twin, he came up with the idea to take fat from Jessie and transplant it into Janna’s face. The procedure also was unique in that many people with Janna’s condition and location of her tumor do not survive to adulthood.

    By increasing volume to the face and repairing some of the damaged tissues, the goal of the procedure was to give Janna’s face a more natural volume and contour so the size of the jaw bone will not be as noticeable, Little said.

    Fat also was a good option for Janna because it has a high concentration of stem cells, which are beneficial because they can form into new types of cells. When they are introduced to a new area, they can regenerate surrounding soft tissue. And with the twins having a nearly 100 percent genetic match, the probability of success was high.

    “I just want to look like my sister and more like a twin,” Janna said. "It is hard being her twin. She's gorgeous.”

    To donate fat, Jessie had to make an effort to gain weight. For months, the normally health-conscious Jessie ate high-calorie foods – including ice cream, pizza and fast food – to develop enough fat that could be removed by liposuction for Janna.

    “She’s my sister, my twin,” Jessie said before the surgery. “Of course I’m going to do anything I can to help.”

    “I want her to be more confident in herself and be proud to say we're twins and not be shy about it because we're exactly alike.”

    It will take several months to assess the full effects of the procedure. One or two more sessions may be needed before the reconstruction is complete.

    While Janna’s portion of the procedure was covered by insurance, Jessie’s was not, so UofL Hospital donated her costs.

    Conjoined twins separated by UofL pediatric surgical team

    Conjoined twins separated by UofL pediatric surgical team

    Conjoined twin girls were separated by UofL physicians on Nov. 11.

    Specialists with University of Louisville Physicians have announced they performed a surgery to separate 7-week-old conjoined twin girls on Nov. 11 at Kosair Children’s Hospital. Since the surgery, the girls have been under close watch of experts in the hospital’s “Just for Kids” Critical Care Center. They are currently still on ventilators but have been getting stronger by the day. Their long-term prognosis is not yet known, but indicators are favorable for continued improvement.

    “In any situation where you have so complex a surgery, there is always a long road to recovery,” said Erle H. Austin III, M.D., pediatric surgeon with UofL Physicians and the UofL School of Medicine's Department of Cardiovascular Surgery. “We are cautiously optimistic, as one or both may require additional surgeries in the future.” Austin also is chief of cardiovascular surgery at Kosair Children’s Hospital.

    “God was definitely watching over the girls and the medical team on the day of the surgery,” said the babies’ mother. “We are so thankful to God and everyone at Kosair Children’s Hospital for getting them this far.

    “We are also thankful to the hospital chaplain, who prayed with us before the delivery and the day of the surgery.”

    The twins were born at Norton Hospital and had been under close watch of UofL Physicians’ neonatologists in the Kosair Children’s Hospital Level IV neonatal intensive care unit.

    The twins were defined as thoraco-omphalopagus, which means their bodies were joined at the chest and abdominal cavity. Their livers were joined and they shared some of the same heart structures.

    Conjoined twins occur in approximately one out of 200,000 live births. Forty to 60 percent are stillborn, and about 35 percent survive only one day. The overall survival rate of conjoined twins is between 5 percent and 25 percent.

    The surgical team waited as long as possible prior to performing the separation surgery. The decision to operate was made after the twins began to need increased breathing support. They also were not growing as they should. One of the infants was more fragile than the other, and survival was in question. The separation procedure was risky for both.

    While originally expected to last about 12 hours, the procedure went smoothly and was completed in approximately eight hours. To prepare, the surgical team had undergone multiple drills using dolls.

    The UofL Physicians' medical team involved in the procedure included two cardiovascular surgeons, a transplant surgeon, a plastic surgeon, two pediatric surgeons, a pediatric surgery fellow and a cardiologist. Other specialists included two additional plastic surgeons, three anesthesiologists, a radiologist, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation specialists, advanced surgical nurses, surgical technologists, biomedical and engineering specialists, information systems technologists, respiratory therapists and blood bank team members. In all, more than 45 people were involved in the planning and surgery. More have been involved in the babies’ care throughout their stay.

    Skydiving spiders and zombie ants at next Beer with a Scientist

    Steve Yanoviak, Ph.D., to speak on rainforest research December 9
    Skydiving spiders and zombie ants at next Beer with a Scientist

    Steve Yanoviaqk, Ph.D.

    For the December edition of Beer with a Scientist, Steve Yanoviak, Ph.D., associate professor and the Tom Wallace Endowed Chair of Conservation at the University of Louisville, will share stories of his adventures in the tropical rainforest.

    Yanoviak has been conducting research in the tropical rainforest canopy for more than two decades. In his discussion, "How to Fall From Trees,” he will highlight some of the amazing discoveries he and his colleagues have made regarding the behavior and ecology of insects that live in the treetops. He will share videos of swimming ants and skydiving insects and spiders, and a story about zombie ants. His presentation will conclude with a brief look at the next phase of his research, which explores the effects of lightning on tropical trees.

    The program begins at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, December 9 at Against the Grain Brewery, 401 E. Main St. A 30-minute presentation will be followed by an informal Q&A session.

    The Beer with a Scientist program began in 2014 and is the brainchild of UofL cancer researcher Levi Beverly, Ph.D. Once a month, the public is invited to enjoy exactly what the title promises:  beer and science.

    Admission is free. Purchase of beer, other beverages or menu items is not required but is encouraged.

    Organizers add that they also encourage Beer with a Scientist patrons to drink responsibly.

    For more information and to suggest future Beer with a Scientist topics, follow Louisville Underground Science on Facebook.

     

    December 1, 2015