News

ATTENTION: New Numbers for Disconnected Pediatric Clinic Phone Lines

The UofL Department of Pediatrics is in the midst of a mandated phone number change for many of our offices and clinics. In the process of converting networks, some clinic phone numbers have been temporarily disconnected. We are working to resolve this issue and reach out to our patients.

Here’s a link to ALL of our new clinic phone numbers.

New van helps Global Health Initiative outreach efforts

Refugee care, health promotion and community engagement get boost with new wheels.
New van helps Global Health Initiative outreach efforts

A new Ford Transit XLT van will help the Global Health Initiative expand its outreach in the community and region.


The Global Health Initiative van is a new mobile addition in support of clinical service, teaching and research.

Purchased in June 2014, the van will assist with many aspects of the overall mission of the GHI.

A primary activity involves refugee care, including immunization and health promotion. Every other week, the van transports personnel, vaccine and supplies to the resettlement agencies where immunization is provided to adults, adolescents and children.

Health promotion activities are also being included in order to address dental care needs, nutrition education, targeted health screening, and medication education.

In addition, the Vaccine and International Health and Travel Clinic has used the van to  implement a mobile clinic in support of pre-travel counseling and immunization for churches and other groups preparing for mission trips.

A third component that will begin later this summer involves community engagement. The van will be taken into neighborhoods and around Jefferson County in support of outreach and research.

All activities involving the van use are grounded in inter-professional practice and education where faculty, staff and students from the Health Sciences and Belknap Campuses learn to work together in support of equity in healthcare and healthcare access.

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Pediatrics reorganizes primary care operation

The University of Louisville Department of Pediatrics has reorganized its general pediatrics division, positioning itself to respond better to the new health care marketplace and needs of the community’s children.

The division provides primary care services to children in Louisville and Campbellsville, Ky., and helps train many of the university’s student doctors, nurses, dentists, psychologists and social workers. In 2013, its 22 pediatricians were responsible for more than 22,000 patients. Approximately 12 percent of the total pediatric population in metro Louisville identifies a UofL pediatrician as their primary care provider.

“Healthcare reform has placed a greater emphasis on primary care, where providers can promote health and safety,” said Gerard Rabalais, M.D., MHA, chairman, University of Louisville Department of Pediatrics. “Pediatric programs like ours may be the best place to achieve success with healthcare reform since we are training the next generation of pediatric providers.”

Consolidating Offices, Redeploying Physicians

The department closed its office at Floyd St. and Broadway on July 1, creating a single, expanded downtown practice, the Children & Youth Project (C&Y), located a few blocks away. C&Y offers all of the services previously offered at the Broadway office and the expanded downtown clinic will serve as a medical home with a wider array of onsite ancillary services: social work; psychology; dental care; home health; speech therapy; WIC nutrition services; and legal counseling.

“This practice demonstrates the power of a university to bring multiple disciplines together to provide comprehensive health care for children,” Rabalais said.

“Consolidating these two offices and deploying our physicians to different locations lays the groundwork for increasing access and building partnerships in the communities we serve,” said Gil Liu, M.D., chief of the UofL general pediatrics division.

Adding Pediatric Practices

This summer, the department partnered with an east Louisville pediatrician Sheila Guelda, M.D.

Plans are also underway to provide general pediatric care in the West End of Louisville.

“We see these additions as opportunities to expand availability to patients and support community practitioners, who don’t have the resources to support multiple disciplines as we do,” Rabalais said.

Creating a Network

All of the Louisville pediatric practices will soon operate as a network. That means patients will have a medical home for routine visits as well as access to urgent care at any of the other Louisville general pediatric practices. The network also will enable families to access ancillary services headquartered at C&Y and specialty care by UofL pediatric specialists.

“We think an arrangement that offers “one stop shopping” for multiple health care providers will be good for all our patients,” Dr. Liu said.

Creating Learning Opportunities for Trainees

The division’s reorganization also ensures that residents, medical students and trainees from other programs will have places to learn primary care pediatrics. Historically, trainees have spent time in community pediatric practices but these practices may struggle to continue hosting students because of changes in the healthcare landscape.

“It is part of our educational mission to expand primary care opportunities,” Rabalais said.

UofL Adds 18 Pediatric Specialists

The University of Louisville Department of Pediatrics has added 18 physicians to its faculty roster, bringing the total number of pediatricians and pediatric specialists to 186 as of July 1.

Pediatric Cardiology

Ashley E. Neal, M.D., assistant professor in pediatric cardiology, completed a residency in general pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a fellowship in pediatric cardiology at Boston Children’s Hospital. She received her medical degree in 2004 at Yale University.

 

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Brit Anderson, M.D., assistant professor in pediatric emergency medicine, completed a pediatric residency at Northwestern University’s Children’s Memorial Hospital (now known as Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago) and a pediatric emergency medicine fellowship at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She received her medical degree in 2008 at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.


Laura Voegele, M.D., assistant professor and mid-level clinician in pediatric emergency medicine, completed a pediatric residency at the University of Louisville. She received her medical degree in 2007 at the University of Louisville.

 


Tracey Wagner, M.D., instructor and clinician in pediatric emergency medicine, completed a pediatric residency at the University of Louisville. She received her medical degree in 2011 at The Ohio State University.

 


Anita Yalamanchi, D.O., instructor and pediatric emergency department clinician, completed a pediatric residency at University of Louisville. She received her medical degree in 2011 at The University of Pikeville Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine.

 

Pediatric Endocrinology

Sara Watson, M.D., assistant professor in pediatric endocrinology, completed a pediatric residency at the University of Louisville and a pediatric endocrinology fellowship at Indiana University. She received her medical degree in 2007 at the University of Louisville.

 

Pediatric Forensic Medicine

Vinod Balakrishna Rao, M.D., has joined the Kosair Charities Division of Pediatric Forensic Medicine as an assistant professor. Rao completed a pediatrics residency in 2011 at Pitt County Memorial Hospital/East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine and a child abuse pediatrics fellowship in 2014 at Westchester Medical Center/New York Medical College. He received his medical degree in 2008 at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine.

General Pediatrics

Matthew D. Kinney, M.D., assistant professor in general pediatrics, completed a pediatric residency at Northwestern University/Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago. He received his medical degree in 2008 at the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

 

Kendall Purcell, M.D. M.P.H., instructor in general pediatrics, completed a pediatric residency at Children’s National Medical Center. She received her medical degree in 2011 at the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

 

Jennifer Stiff, M.D., instructor in general pediatrics, completed a pediatric residency at the University of North Carolina. She received her medical degree in 2011 at the University of Louisville.

 

 

Hematology/Oncology & Bone Marrow Transplant

Michael Angelo Huang, M.D., assistant professor in pediatric hematology/oncology & bone marrow transplant, completed a pediatric hematology/ oncology fellowship in 2012 at Penn State University. He received his medical degree in 2004 at the University of the Philippines and completed his pediatrics residency in 2009 at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia.


Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Cindy DeMastes-Crabtree, M.D., has joined the UofL Department of Pediatrics as chief resident and physician on the Pediatric Hospital Medicine service. Crabtree completed a pediatric residency at the University of Louisville. She received her medical degree in 2011at Pikeville School of Osteopathic Medicine.


Prasanthi Pasala, M.D., has joined UofL Department of Pediatrics as an instructor and will practice primarily at Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center in Jasper, Ind. Pasala completed a pediatric residency at Kosair Children’s Hospital. She received her medical degree in 2011at the University of Cincinnati.


Aurelia C.H. Wood, M.D., has joined the UofL Department of Pediatrics as chief resident and physician on the Pediatric Hospital Medicine service. She completed a pediatric residency at UofL in 2014 and she received her medical degree in 2011 at the Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine.


Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Victoria Statler, M.D., instructor in pediatric infectious diseases, completed a pediatric residency and a Kosair Charities fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Louisville. She received her medical degree in 2007 at the University of Louisville.

 

Neonatology

Sarah Korte, M.D., assistant professor and neonatal hospitalist, completed a pediatric residency at University of Louisville. She received her medical degree in 2010 at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

 

Bethany Woomer, M.D., instructor and neonatal hospitalist, completed a pediatric residency at the University of Louisville. She received her medical degree in 2011 at the University of West Virginia School of Medicine.

 

Weisskopf Child Evaluation Center

Maria Romelinda L. Mendoza, M.D., has joined Weisskopf Child Evaluation Center as an assistant professor. Mendoza completed a pediatric residency at Penn State Children’s Hospital and a developmental and behavioral pediatrics fellowship at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York. She received her medical degree in 2005 at the University of the Philippines.

Man vs. Doctor

Our own Dr. Eli Pendleton suggests top keys to wellness for men.

Man vs. Doctor

by Melody Kitchen, ULP Marketing, posted in WELLNESS on June 13, 2014

“I know why men don’t like coming to see me,” explained Dr. Eli Pendleton, a family medicine doctor with UofL Physicians. “Men have a certain attitude, ‘Why should I go to the doctor?’ They associate the doctor with things they don’t want to do.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that women are twice as likely as men to visit the doctor for annual examinations and preventive services. According to Dr. Pendleton, what is unfortunate about that statistic is that many of the causes of death in men are preventable. In 2010, the CDC listed the top 10 causes of death for men as heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, suicide, Alzheimer’s disease, kidney disease, flu and pneumonia.

“We live in coronary valley,” Dr. Pendleton said. “Look at how many of the top 10 causes of death revolve around heart disease. In many cases, men smoke, drink and eat more, and see the doctor less.”

But men need not fret according to Dr. Pendleton. He said men simply need to engage in preventative maintenance. “I encourage men to take care of themselves like they do the people and things that are important to them. A visit to my office doesn’t mean I’m going to poke and prod. We’re going to talk about your health and I’m going to put the responsibility back at my patient’s feet. We aren’t bulletproof. Our choices will catch-up with us.”

Dr. Pendleton suggests that the top keys to wellness are:

Pediatric Faculty Promoted

The following faculty members of the University of Louisville Department of Pediatrics have been promoted.

 

 

 

 


U of L GI well represented at AASLD

U of L GI well represented at AASLD

Craig J. McClain, M.D., discusses the similarities and key differences in alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) during a postgraduate course session at the AASLD Liver Meeting.

Postgraduate course examines inflammation and steatohepatitis

Members of the University of Louisville Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition and their collaborators presented the following abstracts at the 2014 American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) Liver Meeting held November 7-11, 2014 in Boston:

  • Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Gene Deficiency Ameliorates Hepatic Injury in a Mouse Model of Chronic-Binge-Induced Alcoholic Liver Disease - Irina Kirpich, Huilin Liu, K. Cameron Falkner, Juliane I. Beier, Gavin E. Arteel, Christopher Ramsden, Ariel E. Feldstein, Craig McClain
  • Post-Transplant Hepatitis C Reinfection Following Prolonged Pre-transplant Viral Suppression with Sofosbuvir Plus Ribavirin in a Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Wait-Listed For Orthotopic Liver Transplantation - Eric Davis, Neil Crittenden, Barbra Goshko, Matt Cave
  • Single Center Experience with Simeprevir/Sofosbuvir Combination Therapy for Recurrent Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Liver Transplant Recipients - Neil Crittenden, Eric Davis, Luis Marsano, Craig McClain, Ashutosh Barve, Barbra Goshko, Rob Tatum, Mike Hughes, Chris Jones, Michael R Marvin, Matt Cave
  • The protective role of CAR and PXR in Aroclor 1260-induced Steatohepatitis - B. Wahlang,  K.C. Falkner, M. Song, H. Clair, R. Prough, and M. Cave
  • Suspected Toxicant Associated Steatohepatitis (TASH) in Residents Living Near an Abandoned Chemical Manufacturing Complex - I.Kirpich, M.Mohammad, K.C.Falkner, H.B. Clair, G.E. Arteel, R.A. Prough, M.Cave
  • Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) plays a significant role in alcohol induced dysregulation of lipid metabolism and development of hepatic steatosis - D. V. Avila, J. Zhang, C. J. McClain, S. Barve, and L.Gobejishvili
  • Lipid-derived aldehyde, acrolein, is a critical mediator of alcohol-induced gut-liver injury in alcoholic liver disease - Wei-Yang Chen, Jingwen Zhang, Shirish Barve, Craig McClain, and Swati Joshi-BarveExposure to Vinyl Chloride Metabolites Exacerbates Liver Injury Caused by High Fat Diet in Mice - Lisanne C Anders, Amanda N Douglas, Adrienne M Bushau, Keith C Falkner, Gavin E Arteel, Matt Cave, Craig J McClain and Juliane I Beier
  • 9(S)-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid (HODE) enhances interleukin-1β production of PBMCs from alcoholic liver cirrhosis patients by activation of TRPV1 - Qifa Xie, Mohammad Mohammad, Matthew Cave, Shirish Barve, Irina Kirpich, Craig McClain
  • Oral Administration of Tributyrin Attenuates Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Steatosis, Inflammation and Injury - H. Donde, J. Zhang, S. Ghare, L. Gobejishvili, S. Joshi-Barve, V. Vatsalya, C.J. McClain and S. Barve
  • Interactions between the gut permeability, blood endotoxemia and liver injury in alcoholic patients during detoxification - Irina A.Kirpich, John Umhau, Vatsalya Vatsalya, Melanie Schwandt, Monte Phillips, Timothy Lionetti,  K.Cameron Falkner, Lucy Zhang, Catey Harwell, David T.George, Markus A. Heilig, Craig J. McClain
  • Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Deficiency Exacerbates Chronic Alcohol-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Injury in Mice - Cuiqing Zhao, Liming Liu, Fengyuan Li, Craig McClain, Wenke Feng
  • Serum fibroblast growth factor 19 levels are increased in subjects with alcoholic cirrhosis and positively associated with serum total bile acid levels - Cuiqing Zhao, Mohammad Mohammad, Liming Liu, Keith C. Falkner, Zhanxiang Zhou, Craig J. McClain, Wenke Feng, Matthew C. Cave
  • Zinc Sulfate for Alcoholic Cirrhosis (ZAC) Clinical Trial-Interim Analysis of Clinical Parameters, Intestinal Permeability and Liver Fibrosis Biomarkers - Ming Song, Mohammad K. Mohammad, Cam Falkner, Craig J. McClain, Matthew C. Cave
  • Zinc Sulfate for Alcoholic Cirrhosis (ZAC) Clinical Trial-Interim Analysis of Liver Injury/Inflammation Biomarkers - Mohammad K. Mohammad, Ming Song, Falkner K.C., Craig J. McClain, Matthew C. Cave
  • Elevated biomarker-indicated liver disease and pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with environmental PCB exposure in Anniston, Alabama - H.B. Clair, K.C. Falkner, B. Wahlang, R.A. Prough, and M. Cave
  • Proteomics analysis of liver from mice with high fat diet-induced fatty liver disease identifies inhibition of HNF4a as a mechanism by which arsenic promotes progression to steatohepatitis - Walter H. Watson, Tom J. Burke, Veronica L. Massey, Gavin E. Arteel, Michael L. Merchant
  • Quetiapine Fumarate XR showed better clinical management in elevated liver injury during titration phase in very heavy drinkers - H. Donde, V. Vatsalya, C. J. McClain, S. S. Barve
  • Lack of antiviral therapy response is associated with elevated circulating levels of cytokeratin-18 and inflammatory cytokine IL-8 in patients with chronic hepatitis C - Bryan Lamoreau, Smita Ghare, Shirish Barve, Craig McClain, and Swati Joshi-Barve

    Rodriguez named Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Man of the Year

    Personal care and dedication to his patients leads to recognition.
    Rodriguez named Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Man of the Year

    Cesar Rodriguez, M.D.


    There are compelling reasons why Cesar Rodriguez, M.D., has been named Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Man of the Year.

    For one, the oncologist and hematologist who serves as an assistant professor of medicine in the University of Louisville Division of Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation raised more money for the society than any other person raised within the 10-week period that ended May 30, according to the society’s executive director, Shane Stuber.

    "Dr. Rodriguez raised over $32,000," Stuber said. "He did that by hosting a couple of events, using social media, running an email campaign, and getting sponsorships. KentuckyOne was one of the sponsors."

    For another, according to Stuber, Dr. Rodriguez is devoted to patients.

    "I have been at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center on Saturday afternoons, and I have seen Dr. Rodriguez making special rounds," Stuber said. "He puts his patients' needs above his own. There are great doctors, and there are special doctors. Dr. Rodriguez is both."

    The young physician focuses on bone marrow transplants and treating blood malignancies. The native of Mexico came to Louisville five years ago to complete a fellowship and a few years later he began to partner with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society when he saw how much the society did.

    "All of my patients have benefited from the society, whether it be from help with co-pays for medications, or help with gas money, or with education,” Rodriguez said. "I wanted to return something to the society for all they have done for cancer patients."

    Dr. Rodriguez' relatives are all back in Mexico. That makes his patients mean even more to him.

    "The nice thing about my specialty is that is gives me the opportunity to build a strong bond with my patients and their families," Rodriguez said. "There comes a time when they see me as if I'm part of their family instead of just being their doctor."

    And since they're like his family away from home, Dr. Rodriguez grieves over every untimely death, and rejoices with every remission.

    "The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society funds research to help find cures for blood cancers," Rodriguez said. "I am very involved with working on clinical research, and I use some investigational treatments on our patients. In several cases, these study drugs have saved their lives."

    Dr. Rodriguez has seen certain research medicines work so well that, "in some cases, there has been a dramatic turning point to their advantage. Maybe the drug cures them—or sometimes it allows them to live long enough to enjoy things they never would have imagined if not for these treatments. We’ve had patients get married. We’ve had patients watch their babies grow.

    "Obviously there are cases where we don’t see positive outcomes. But seeing these miracles keeps everybody going."

    About the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Kentucky

    The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Kentucky serves 4,000 adult and pediatric patients a year. Funds raised pay for financial assistance for patients and families, support groups for patients and family members, education and research. To donate to the society, contact Shane Stuber at shane.stuber@lls.org, or call 502-584-8490.

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    DOM Lung Health Initiative group makes impact at 2014 ATS conference

    Louisville group makes its mark at international meeting in San Diego.
    DOM Lung Health Initiative group makes impact at 2014 ATS conference

    Pulmonologists from across the globe, including a contingent from the U of L Department of Medicine's Lung Health Initiative, converged in May in San Diego for thd 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference.


    Several members of the University of Louisville Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Disorders Medicine and the U of L Department of Medicine Lung Health Initiative (LHI) participated in the recent 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference, an annual meeting of the largest respiratory society in the world.

    Among the highlights for the U of L contingent include:

    • Members of the LHI participated in activities related to the Health Equality Initiative of the ATS, an initiative that has become a center piece of the society’s strategy towards reducing health disparities. The May issue of the Annals of the ATS focused on this area.
    • Department of Medicine Chairman Dr. Jesse Roman ended his term as Chair of the ATS Respiratory Cell & Molecular Biology (RCMB) Assembly and accepted the position of Chair of the Medical Advisory Board of the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation.  He also served on the new RCMB Working Group on the Future of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Research, participated in a panel discussion about Careers for Junior Investigators, facilitated poster discussion sessions on interstitial lung disease, and delivered a lecture in the session Breakthroughs of the Year: Aging and Senescence.
    • Researchers from the LHI Lung Cancer Team presented novel observations about the mechanisms by which nicotine promotes lung cancer (Edilson Torres-Gonzalez and John Greenwell).
    • The LHI Lung Interstitial Lung Disease Team presented on the role of aging in lung tissue remodeling and fibrosis and how tobacco influences these processes (Glenn Vicary and Jeffrey Ritzenthaler).  They also presented information about sarcoidosis (Karim El-Kersh, Tanya Wiese, Rafael Perez).
    • The LHI Critical Care Medicine Team discussed the role of lactate levels in critically ill patients (Rodrigo Cavallazzi).
    • The LHI Pulmonary Hypertension Team presented cases requiring innovative approaches to the management of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary embolism (Patton Thompson, J. Shaun Smith). They also presented information on histone deacetylase inhibitors using animal models of pulmonary vascular disease (Igor Zelko and Rodney Folz).
    • Members of the LHI COPD Team presented new methods for stimulation of abdominal muscles to improve breathing and related areas (Rodney Folz).
    • The LHI Lung Transplantation Team presented on allograft rejection (David Nunley, Victor Van Berkel, Allan Ramirez).

    In addition, Pulmonary/CCM Fellows in from the pulmonary division participated in the Fellows Track Symposia  and presented the following posters:


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    DOM Lung Health Initiative group makes impact at 2014 ATS conference

    Louisville group makes its mark at international meeting in San Diego.
    DOM Lung Health Initiative group makes impact at 2014 ATS conference

    Pulmonologists from across the globe, including a contingent from the U of L Department of Medicine's Lung Health Initiative, converged in May in San Diego for thd 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference.


    Several members of the University of Louisville Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Disorders Medicine and the U of L Department of Medicine Lung Health Initiative (LHI) participated in the recent 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference, and annual meeting of the largest respiratory society in the world.

    Among the highlights for the U of L contingent include:

    • Members of the LHI participated in activities related to the Health Equality Initiative of the ATS, an initiative that has become a center piece of the society’s strategy towards reducing health disparities. The May issue of the Annals of the ATS focused on this area.
    • Department of Medicine Chairman Dr. Jesse Roman ended his term as Chair of the ATS Respiratory Cell & Molecular Biology (RCMB) Assembly and accepted the position of Chair of the Medical Advisory Board of the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation.  He also served on the new RCMB Working Group on the Future of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Research, participated in a panel discussion about Careers for Junior Investigators, facilitated poster discussion sessions on interstitial lung disease, and delivered a lecture in the session Breakthroughs of the Year: Aging and Senescence.
    • Researchers from the LHI Lung Cancer Team presented novel observations about the mechanisms by which nicotine promotes lung cancer (Edilson Torres-Gonzalez and John Greenwell).
    • The LHI Lung Interstitial Lung Disease Team presented on the role of aging in lung tissue remodeling and fibrosis and how tobacco influences these processes (Glenn Vicary and Jeffrey Ritzenthaler).  They also presented information about sarcoidosis (Karim El-Kersh, Tanya Wiese, Rafael Perez).
    • The LHI Critical Care Medicine Team discussed the role of lactate levels in critically ill patients (Rodrigo Cavallazzi).
    • The LHI Pulmonary Hypertension Team presented cases requiring innovative approaches to the management of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary embolism (Patton Thompson, J. Shaun Smith). They also presented information on histone deacetylase inhibitors using animal models of pulmonary vascular disease (Igor Zelko and Rodney Folz).
    • Members of the LHI COPD Team presented new methods for stimulation of abdominal muscles to improve breathing and related areas (Rodney Folz).
    • The LHI Lung Transplantation Team presented on allograft rejection (David Nunley, Victor Van Berkel, Allan Ramirez).

    In addition, Pulmonary/CCM Fellows in from the pulmonary division participated in the Fellows Track Symposia  and presented the following posters:

    U of L faculty show well at DDW 2014

    Several members of the University of Louisville Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition were highlighted at the recent Digestive Disease Week 2014 conference held May 3-6, 2014 in Chicago.

    U of L faculty were well represented, including:

    • Motility: Dr. Thomas Abell’s motility program had over 10 presentations at DDW and accompanying satellite programs.

    • LiverDr. Craig McClain presented the state-of-the-art talk on “Nutrition, Gut Barrier Dysfunction and Fatty Liver Disease.”  Drs. Irina Kirpich, Swati Joshi-Barve and Juliane Beier all had oral presentations.

    • NutritionDr. Stephen McClave presented at a Meet-the-Professors luncheon and had several posters related to nutrition.

    • IBD/CancerDr. Gerald Dryden presented data on endoscopic injection of cytokine microbeads in a mouse model of colon cancer.

    Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Miller win MediStar Awards

    Accolades recognize innovation and leadership that lead to improvements in medical care.

    The Institute of Molecular Cardiology, under the leadership of Roberto Bolli, M.D., FAHA, received the Healthcare Innovation Award and Donald Miller, M.D., Ph.D., director of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, was named the XLerateHealth Physician of the Year at the MediStar Awards presented May 13 at the Hyatt Regency Louisville.

    The Healthcare Innovation Award is presented to an organization that has developed a new procedure, device, service program or treatment that improves the delivery of medical care.

    Under the leadership of Bolli, Chief of the U of L Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and the Jewish Hospital Heart & Lung Institute Distinguished Chair in Cardiology, the Institute of Molecular Cardiology (IMC) has become recognized worldwide as a leading cardiovascular research program for its contributions in ischemic heart disease, heart failure, diabetes and obesity and adult stem cell therapy for cardiac repair and regeneration.

    Established in 2001, the IMC consistently brings more than $13 million annually in federal funding to the Louisville Metro region in developing novel treatments and future cures for the nation’s No. 1 killer, cardiovascular disease.

    The XLerateHealth Physician of the Year Award is conferred upon a physician who has shown outstanding leadership and vision and has contributed to his or her workplace, leaving a lasting legacy.

    Named director of the Brown Cancer Center in 1999, Miller also is the Chief of the Division of Medical Oncology & Hematology and the James Graham Brown Foundation Chair and Professor of Oncology and Associate Vice President for Health Affairs at U of L.

    Under his leadership, the JGBCC developed a nationally recognized leadership program in cancer drug development with more than two dozen novel treatments being studied and three entering early phase clinical trials. Miller’s own laboratory is currently studying short DNA sequences which are believed to cause cancer cell death; it is expected that treatments from his lab will enter clinical trials within the next two years.

    Since 2007 IGE Media, publisher of Medical News and Medical News For You, has recognized excellence at the annual MediStar Awards, honoring professionals, volunteers and programs for their impact on health care.

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    Roman, U of L to host 'Fibrosis Across the Species' conference

    Researchers to discuss deadly lung disease affecting horses, dogs, cats, humans.
    Roman, U of L to host 'Fibrosis Across the Species' conference

    Hosted by the U of L Department of Medicine, researchers will meet in Louisville for the "Fibrosis Across the Species" conference to discuss and study pulmonary fibrosis and its effects on humans and animals


    Human lung disease researchers and veterinarians will meet April 27-29 at The Brown Hotel in Louisville for the "Fibrosis Across Species" workshop being convened by the Westie Foundation of America (WFA) and hosted by the University of Louisville's Medical Center and its Equine Center.

    Led by U of L Department of Medicine Chairman Dr. Jesse Roman, the unique conference takes place just days prior to the 140th running of the world famous Kentucky Derby.

    This unusual combination of human and veterinary scientists is tasked with creating a road map for comparative research in PF. Comparative research – or research that compares human disease to similar diseases in animals – has been used successfully in the treatment of cancer and, in fact, there is a comparative research division at the National Cancer Institute.

    "We are concerned about the growing incidence and prevalence of Pulmonary Fibrosis and realize that research done the customary way has limitations," Roman, a human PF researcher, said. "Studying animals, in particular horses and dogs, may allow us to better understand the underlying causes of this lung disease and how to best tackle finding life-saving treatments for all affected species."

    Pulmonary Fibrosis (PF) is a little known lung disease among most of the public, yet the disease claims as many human lives each year as breast cancer. In addition to horses, the disease is also known to affect cats, and dogs, especially terrier breeds of dog like the West Highland White Terrier (WHWT).

    There are no approved drugs for the disease in the United States, though a drug has been approved in Japan, the European Union and Canada.

    "We are pleased to convene this stellar team of scientists who will review and compare fibrotic disease in animals and humans and pave the way for major discovery," Bebe Pinter, CEO of the Westie Foundation of America said.

    The "Fibrosis Across Species" meeting will build on the success of a 2007 meeting, also convened by the WFA,that brought together human and veterinary scientists to discuss similarities between the WHWT and human forms of PF.

    The scientific paper from the 2007 meeting was published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. The paper identifies similarities across species and makes strong suggestions for a path forward. One of the experts’ recommendations is the convening of a meeting that fits the mold of the Fibrosis Across Species meeting.

    Many of the key researchers in that meeting will be leading the Louisville meeting along with key advocacy organizations, along with the WFA.

    ► For a full agenda for the meeting and to learn more, please visit www.westiefoundation.org.

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    Roman, U of L to host 'Fibrosis Across the Species' conference

    Researchers to discuss deadly lung disease affecting horses, dogs, cats, humans.
    Roman, U of L to host 'Fibrosis Across the Species' conference

    Hosted by the U of L Department of Medicine, researchers will meet in Louisville for the "Fibrosis Across the Species" conference to discuss and study pulmonary fibrosis and its effects on humans and animals


    Human lung disease researchers and veterinarians will meet April 27-29 at The Brown Hotel in Louisville for the "Fibrosis Across Species" workshop being convened by the Westie Foundation of America (WFA) and hosted by the University of Louisville's Medical Center and its Equine Center.

    Led by U of L Department of Medicine Chairman Dr. Jesse Roman, the unique conference takes place just days prior to the 140th running of the world famous Kentucky Derby.

    This unusual combination of human and veterinary scientists is tasked with creating a road map for comparative research in PF. Comparative research – or research that compares human disease to similar diseases in animals – has been used successfully in the treatment of cancer and, in fact, there is a comparative research division at the National Cancer Institute.

    "We are concerned about the growing incidence and prevalence of Pulmonary Fibrosis and realize that research done the customary way has limitations," Roman, a human PF researcher, said. "Studying animals, in particular horses and dogs, may allow us to better understand the underlying causes of this lung disease and how to best tackle finding life-saving treatments for all affected species."

    Pulmonary Fibrosis (PF) is a little known lung disease among most of the public, yet the disease claims as many human lives each year as breast cancer. In addition to horses, the disease is also known to affect cats, and dogs, especially terrier breeds of dog like the West Highland White Terrier (WHWT).

    There are no approved drugs for the disease in the United States, though a drug has been approved in Japan, the European Union and Canada.

    "We are pleased to convene this stellar team of scientists who will review and compare fibrotic disease in animals and humans and pave the way for major discovery," Bebe Pinter, CEO of the Westie Foundation of America said.

    The "Fibrosis Across Species" meeting will build on the success of a 2007 meeting, also convened by the WFA,that brought together human and veterinary scientists to discuss similarities between the WHWT and human forms of PF.

    The scientific paper from the 2007 meeting was published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. The paper identifies similarities across species and makes strong suggestions for a path forward. One of the experts’ recommendations is the convening of a meeting that fits the mold of the Fibrosis Across Species meeting.

    Many of the key researchers in that meeting will be leading the Louisville meeting along with key advocacy organizations, along with the WFA.

    ► For a full agenda for the meeting and to learn more, please visit www.westiefoundation.org.

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    Student Marathon Runners Award Medals to Pediatric Patients

    Student Marathon Runners Award Medals to Pediatric Patients

    This is the UofL School of Medicine's sixth year to participate in Medals4Mettle.

    University of Louisville medical student runners marked the end of the Kentucky Derby Festival Marathon and the university’s sixth Medals4Mettle season by presenting their hard-earned medals to pediatric patient “running buddies.”

    This year, 75 med students were paired with children being treated by UofL pediatric specialists. The patients range in age from 18 months to young adultand have been diagnosed with conditions such as brain cancer, bone cancer, hemophilia, leukemia and sickle cell disease. (read more)

    Click here for more photos from the event.

    U of L cardiologists to take part in women's heart disease symposium

    One-day conference to address current guidelines and trends in the field of cardiovascular medicine.
    U of L cardiologists to take part in women's heart disease symposium

    Several U of L cardiologists will take part in 2014 Louisville Symposium on Heart Disease in Women at Jewish Hospital's Rudd Heart & Lung Center.


    Several doctors with the University of Louisville Division of Cardiovascular Medicine are set to speak at the 2014 Louisville Symposium on Heart Disease in Women.

    The conference will be held Saturday, June 28, at the Rudd Heart & Lung Center, 16th Floor Conference Center, 201 Abraham Flexner Way, in Louisville. The conference will begin at 7 a.m. with registration and a continental breakfast, with the program starting at 8 a.m. The event will end at 5 p.m.

    Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, hypertension and stroke, is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Long thought to be a disease primarily affecting men, cardiovascular disease actually kills more women than men on an annual basis.

    Although heart disease is a multi-factored, complex disorder, it is preventable, but education for both patients and health care professionals about the prevention, recognition and treatment of heart disease in women is essential.

    READ THE FULL ARTICLE

    Louisville Symposium on Heart Disease in Women web site

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    Gregory Barnes named director of UofL Autism Center

    Gregory Barnes, M.D., Ph.D., is the inaugural permanent director of the University of Louisville Autism Center. Barnes comes to UofL from Vanderbilt University. Barnes also will hold the Spafford Ackerly Chair for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and faculty positions in the departments of Neurology and Pediatrics.(more)

     

    UofL Pediatrician Elected to Medical Honor Society

    University of Louisville pediatrician V. Faye Jones, M.D., Ph.D, MSPH, has been elected to Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Practicing physicians are elected to the society in recognition of their scholarly achievements and professional contributions. Nearly 75 percent of U.S. medical school deans are members of AΩA. The honor society also includes more than 50 Nobel Prize winners.

    A professor of pediatrics, Dr. Jones is the medical director of UofL Physicians Pediatrics-Broadway, a primary care teaching practice of the UofL Department of Pediatrics.

    She also serves as the university’s Assistant Vice President for Health Affairs/Diversity Initiatives. In this position, Dr. Jones oversees the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, which works to promote an environment of inclusiveness throughout all of the UofL Health Sciences Center schools. Previously, she was the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and was responsible for the UofL School of Medicine Office of Minority and Rural Affairs.

    Dr. Jones completed medical school and her pediatric residency at the University of Louisville and began practicing pediatrics in 1988 at an inner city clinic in Milwaukee. She returned to Louisville in 1990. She earned a master’s degree from U of L’s School of Public Health in 2001 and a doctorate in 2006.