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Arts in Healing music program launched at James Graham Brown Cancer Center

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Arts in Healing music program launched at James Graham Brown Cancer Center

UofL cancer center is sole cancer facility in Kentucky offering program to patients

Arts in Healing music program launched at James Graham Brown Cancer Center

Left to right, Greg Acker, Lorinda Jones and Wayne Krigger

The soothing sound of music has been added to the arsenal of cancer-fighting therapy offered by the James Graham Brown Cancer Center at the University of Louisville.

Beginning this week, local musicians will play twice each week for patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment through the Arts in Healing program of the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts. The James Graham Brown Cancer Center is the only cancer facility in Kentucky offering the program.

Cellist Wayne Krigger, harpist Lorinda Jones and flutist Greg Acker will perform solo sets for patients, said Cesar Rodriguez, M.D., of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Division who brought the program to the cancer center. “We brought the program to the James Graham Brown Cancer Center because we know that music contributes to the overall well-being of our patients,” Rodriguez said. “We initiated a pilot program of music in our Chemotherapy Infusion Unit and the Bone Marrow Clinic, and the feedback was overwhelming. Our patients were enthusiastic in their support of the program, so we decided to launch the program permanently.”

“The Kentucky Center is very proud to count the James Graham Brown Cancer Center as a partner in bringing the healing power of the arts, and particularly, music to their patients,” Kristin Hughes, Arts in Health manager at the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts, said. “Arts in Healing in the Chemotherapy Infusion Unit and the Bone Marrow Clinic has been very successful – a win-win for patients, families, artists and staff alike.”

The healing benefits of music have been documented by research. In one study conducted by the University of Rochester Medical Center, patients who underwent bone-marrow transplants reported less pain and nausea after listening to music. The researchers looked at 42 patients, aged 5-65, who were being treated for various types of cancer, including leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. Half the patients listened to music after their transplants and the rest received standard follow-up care. The study revealed that patients who had music as part of their treatment reported significantly less pain and nausea. Before the sessions, they rated their pain and nausea as severe, but after the sessions only moderate.

The Arts in Healing program is made possible with support from the M. Krista Loyd Cancer Resource Center at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, the Humana Foundation and the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts Endowment Fund.

 

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