Graduate Student Spotlight

Erin O’Reilly

Erin O’Reilly

Erin O’Reilly is a Humanities Ph.D. candidate who is working on her dissertation entitled Anxiety and the Book: How Shakespeare and Cervantes Negotiate the New Printed Word. Erin is one of the twelve graduate students across the country selected to participate to the 2018 Dissertation Seminar for Scholars of the History of the Book in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, presented by the prestigious Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

The seminar is open to graduate students in the early stages of the dissertation process, who have written at least a prospectus or first chapter, and class meetings will be tailored to each student’s research project. The seminar is led by Dr. Adam Hooks of the University of Iowa, who specializes in Shakespeare and early modern printing, and Dr. Michael Johnston from Purdue University, who focuses on late medieval England and the manuscript book.

Nadeem Zaman

Nadeem Zaman

Nadeem Zaman graduated from the PhD in Humanities at U of L in 2017 with a creative dissertation, a historical novel entitled In the Time of the Others, set against the backdrop of the civil war of 1971 that led to the birth of Bangladesh as a nation.

After a year spent in Dhaka, Bangladesh, teaching and doing archival research for his fiction, Nadeem's debut novel is here and is being released by Picador India: congratulations, Nadeem!

Bamba Ndiaye

Bamba Ndiaye

Bamba Ndiaye, a doctoral candidate in the Humanities Ph.D. Program, won the 2018 Barbara Harlow Prize for Excellence in Graduate Research at the University of Texas at Austin's 18th Annual Africa Conference with a paper entitled "African American Evangelic Missions and Social Reforms in The Congo: The Activism of Reverend William Henry Sheppard."

His paper analyzes the impact of African American missionaries on the African continent following the Second Great Awakening of the late 19th century. Bamba's essay demonstrates how Sheppard (who settled in Louisville at the end of his life) became an entrusted ally of the Congolese peoples during his time in the region (1890-1910). Additionally, the paper highlights Sheppard's use of photographic images and attention from the press to publicize Belgian atrocities in the Congo. These actions galvanized Pan-Africanists throughout the African Diaspora, who began denouncing the Belgian empire and advocating for justice on behalf of the Congolese peoples.

See a list of finalists

Treva Hodges

Treva Hodges

Treva Hodges is a Humanities Ph.D. student working on traumatic captivity narratives and their persistent appeal in the American imaginary. Her research focuses on the narrative of the life of Cynthia Ann Parker as a case study.

Treva has been invited by a descendant of Cynthia Ann Parker and the Quanah Parker Society to participate in a memorial service in Parker's honor in April 2018 at the Pease River site, the site where Cynthia Ann Parker was taken back into Anglo-American custody.

Next September, Treva will present her research at the National Cowboy Symposium co-organized by the Quanah Parker Society. She will have the opportunity to receive feedback from the Comanche tribal members who are direct descendants of Cynthia Ann Parker as well as from other historians.

Photo of Sarah Moffett

Sarah Ivens Moffett

UofL School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies recognized Humanities Ph,D student Sarah Ivens Moffett in the January 2018 spotlight.

Learn more about Sarah on the SIGS website