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Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry

Major: CHEM
Degree Awarded: Ph.D.
Unit: GA
Program Webpage: http://louisville.edu/chemistry/


Program Information

The Department of Chemistry, in the College of Arts and Sciences, offers graduate programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry with options in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, biomolecular structure and engineering, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and chemical physics.

The general requirements for admission to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, for admission to candidacy, and for the doctoral degree are stated in the General Information section of this catalog. The following additional provisions apply to the programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry.

Program Admission Procedure

Students seeking a graduate degree in chemistry should meet the following requirements:

  1. A B.A. or B.S. degree in chemistry or in a related field such as physics, engineering, or mathematics. It is expected that students will have obtained a background in chemistry equivalent to 36 hours of undergraduate coursework. Students planning to pursue graduate study in chemical physics may substitute some of the chemistry hours with advanced courses in physics or mathematics beyond those required for a B.A. or B.S. in chemistry. Students with inadequate preparation will be required to register for specific courses in the area of deficiency. Some of these courses, subject to approval by the department, may be accepted for graduate credit. Admission to graduate study in chemical physics is made on the recommendation of the entrance committee for that option.
  2. A minimum quality point standing of 3.0/4.0.
  3. Submission of Graduate Record Examination scores (quantitative and verbal scores totaling at least 1000 with an analytical score of 2.5 or totaling at least 900 with an analytical score of 3.0).

In individual cases, the conditional admission of a student who does not satisfactorily meet the above requirements may be recommended by the department to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies. If admission is granted, that student will be subject to those conditions specified by the department or School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies as being necessary to remedy the conditional admission.



Curriculum


General Requirements

A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit is required.  At least 15 semester hours must be in chemistry courses.  An overall GPA of 3.0 must be maintained.  Details are given in the current “Graduate School Bulletin”.

Chemistry Requirements

 1.  Students must pass at least six graduate courses from at least three of six divisions (or research areas) with a minimum grade of ‘C’ in any one course.  A ‘C-’ grade is considered unacceptable.  The areas are: Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, and Physics. An overall GPA of 3.0 or greater is required by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies.

2. Students with a native language other than English must show a proficiency in English. This requirement may be met with a grade of ‘B’ in Eng. 101 (or equivalent) or an acceptable score on a standardized test (such as the "Michigan test").  A grade of ‘B-’ in Eng. 101 is considered unacceptable.

3. A series of written examinations designed to show a student’s in-depth knowledge of the chosen area of concentration. Masters students considering transfer to the Ph.D. program may also take the exams. Students must begin with the first exam of their second semester. Exams will be given the second week of January, March, May, September, and November. Each division with students actively taking cumulative exams, will write its own exam. Student's may take any available exam, but may only take one exam in a given month. Exams are scored as 0, 1, 2, or 3 points. Students must accumulate 12 points by the end of the 10th consecutive exam to qualify for the Ph.D. program. Students who fail to accumulate 12 points by the end of the 10th exam will be placed in the Masters program.

4.The research proposal (RP) is intended to demonstrate the student's ability to develop, explain, and defend research ideas. The proposal may present preliminary results from the student's research and it describes possible future directions. This is not necessarily the work the student intends to complete for their dissertation. Students are encouraged to show their originality and innovation. The research proposal must be completed prior to the beginning of the 4th year. Evaluation of the RP is made by the student's graduate advisory committee, which is chaired by the research director.

 The RP consists of a written proposal, an oral presentation, and oral examination. The written portion is to be submitted to the committee at least one week prior to the oral portion. The committee may return unsatisfactory written proposals to the student and delay the oral portion until at least one week after an acceptable rewrite is received. A student failing the oral portion may repeat it only one time, at the discretion of the student's graduate advisory committee.

5.  A one-hour literature seminar on a topic in chemistry of current interest (Chem 695). The student must present this seminar in the second or third semester of his/her program (excluding summer).

6. Scientific publication is an important element of graduate education and research.  Therefore, it is normally expected that prior to the Research Seminar, a manuscript based on the student’s research would have been submitted to a peer-reviewed journal.  The student’s contribution must be substantial to both the scientific content and the drafting of the manuscript.  Before completion of the Ph.D. program, a published article and a manuscript submitted to peer-reviewed journals are expected.  It is highly recommended that the student distribute the submitted manuscript (s) to the members of her/his Research Committee.

7. A one-hour seminar on the student’s dissertation research project is to be given before the end of the fourth year in the program.  This seminar is intended to help the student organize his/her research efforts, provide the opportunity to present preliminary results on work completed, and to allow the student's research committee a formal setting to evaluate progress and make recommendations. The MS degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the research seminar.

8. Research: Chem 691-692.  A research advisor must be selected in the first semester in the graduate program.



Departmental Faculty


Richard P. Baldwin
Professor

John W. Brown
Emeritus

Robert M. Buchanan
Professor

Christopher T Burns

Assistant Professor

Thomas H. Crawford
Emeritus

Teresa W. M. Fan
Associate Professor

Craig A. Grapperhaus
Associate Professor

Gerald B. Hammond
Professor

Richard M. Higashi
Associate Professor

Pawel M. Kozlowski
Associate Professor

N. Thornton Lipscomb
Emeritus

Jinjun Liu

Assistant Professor

Frederick Luzzio
Associate Professor

Muriel C. Maurer
Associate Professor

Sergio B. Mendes
Associate Professor

Hunter N. Moseley

Assistant Professor

Eugene Mueller

Professor

Michael H. Nantz
Professor

Mark E. Noble
Professor

George R. Pack
Professor

Aleeta M. Powe
Assistant Professor

Christine V. Rich
Assistant Professor

John F. Richardson
Associate Professor

Gradus L. Shoemaker
Emeritus

K. Grant Taylor
Emeritus

Charles A. Trapp
Emeritus

Richard J. Wittebort
Professor

Chair

M. Cecilia Yappert
Professor

Francis P. Zamborini

Assistant Professor



Contact Information

Chemistry - Ph.D.

Michael Nantz,Ph.D.
Director of Graduate Studies
michael.nantz@louisville.edu
(502)852-8069
 

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