Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health Sciences

Major: PHSCPHDENV
Degree Awarded: Ph.D.
Unit: GH
Program Webpage: http://louisville.edu/sphis/departments/health-promotion-behavioral-sciences

Program Information

The School of Public Health and Information Sciences offers a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Public Health Sciences with specializations in the following areas:

  • Environmental Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health Management and Policy
  • Health Promotion

Competencies and admissions information for each specialization follow:

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Environmental Health

Introduction

The specialization in Environmental Health for the Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences is designed to provide scholars with the tools to conduct in-depth research and provide advanced instruction in the discipline of environmental health at the college and university level. It also prepares researchers for governmental, private, and voluntary organizations involved in environmental protection and the prevention of disease and injury. In addition to understanding advanced concepts of environmental health, industrial hygiene, and toxicology, graduates of this specialization are expected to develop skills that enable them to identify and define questions of environmental and occupational health importance, design research studies to address these questions, and to complete a program of research that demonstrates abilities as an independent investigator.

Competencies

To graduate, a student in the Ph.D. specialization in Environmental Health must demonstrate the following competencies:

Competency

Demonstrated by

In depth knowledge of the history of environmental health.

  • Passing qualifying examination
  • Successful completion and defense of dissertation

Mastery of experimental study designs and the ability to identify optimal designs for specific hypotheses.

 

 

 

 

  • Successful development, conduct, completion, and defense of the dissertation

Ability to critically evaluate published environmental health research.

Expertise in one or more environmental health specialty such as risk assessment, environmental management, environmental and occupational toxicology.

Practical knowledge of issues in research management including:

  • Formation and leadership of multidisciplinary teams.
  • Staffing, budgeting, tracking.
  • Subject recruitment and retention.
  • Data quality control and data safety management.
  • Funding mechanisms and grantsmanship.
  • Research ethics and regulations.

Professional quality peer-review, oral and poster presentation, report, grant, and manuscript writing.

Admission

An applicant who has satisfactorily completed an appropriate degree with a specialization in environmental health or an advanced degree (M.D., D.V.M. Ph.D., D.O.) may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. in Public Health Environmental Health Specialization pending evaluation of appropriate training, experience, or coursework. The previous graduate work by such an applicant is reviewed on a case-by-case basis, and the applicant, if admitted, may be required to take additional course work prior to completing the minimum 39 credit hours required for post-master’s doctoral work.

The following are additionally required for admission:

  • Undergraduate and Graduate GPA > 3.0 on 4.0 scale
  • Recommended minimum GRE > 60th percentile - Verbal and Quantitative scores
  • If applicable, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score > 60th percentile

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Epidemiology

Introduction

The specialization in Epidemiology in the Ph.D. program in Public Health Sciences is designed to develop academic researchers in population-based epidemiology.

Competencies

To graduate, students in the Ph.D. specialization in Epidemiology must demonstrate the following competencies in addition to those for the M.S. degree:

  • In depth knowledge of the history and philosophy of epidemiology
  • Mastery of experimental and observational study designs and the ability to identify optimal designs for specific hypotheses
  • Ability to develop and apply:
      • Questionnaires
      • Biomarkers for health status, exposure and susceptibility
  • Mastery of multivariable analytic methods for evaluating risk and prognosis
  • Ability to critically evaluate the published epidemiologic research
  • Expertise in one or more epidemiologic specialties such as nutritional, molecular, clinical, genetic, cancer, or chronic disease epidemiology
  • Practical knowledge of issues in research management including:
      • Formation and leadership of multidisciplinary teams
      • Staffing, budgeting, tracking
      • Subject recruitment and retention
      • Data quality control and data safety management
      • Funding mechanisms and grantsmanship
      • Research ethics and regulations
  • Professional quality peer-review, oral and poster presentation, report, grant, and manuscript writing
  • Mentoring of junior peers
  • Development, conduct, completion and defense of a dissertation on an original research project

Competencies are demonstrated by passage of the proficiency and candidacy examinations, by successful mentoring of master’s students or doctoral students not yet in candidacy, and by successful completion and defense of the dissertation.

Admission

Students who have satisfactorily completed the M.S. degree in Epidemiology are eligible for the Ph.D. specialization in Epidemiology. Students with a master’s degree in a related discipline or an advanced degree (for example, M.D., Ph.D., D.O.) may be accepted also pending evaluation of appropriate training, experience, and coursework. Previous coursework in mathematics and/or statistics and biological or health sciences (for example, biology, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, microbiology) is strongly recommended. Students completing the M.Sc. in Clinical Investigation Sciences or M.P.H. with an Epidemiology specialization may be required to complete additional coursework to be accepted into the Epidemiology Ph.D. specialization.

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Public Health Management and Policy

Introduction

The specialization in Public Health Management and Policy is designed to prepare graduates for careers as researchers and teachers involved in the efforts to protect and promote the health and well-being of communities and populations. It provides graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to attain academic positions involving scholarly research and instruction in the disciplines of public health management and key policy and management positions in governmental as well as private and voluntary organizations. In addition to an in depth understanding of the infrastructure and context of Public Health Management and Policy, graduates of this specialization are expected to be able to identify issues and questions of importance with regard to the management of the resources of public health and to design and carry out a program of research designed to address these issues and questions. Graduates should be able to demonstrate abilities as an independent investigator as well as a team collaborator.

Competencies

To graduate, a student in the Ph.D. specialization in Public Health Management and Policy must demonstrate the following competencies:

1) In depth knowledge of the history of public health, health management, and health services research.
2) Mastery of experimental research study designs, including qualitative as well as quantitative, and the ability to identify optimal designs for specific hypotheses.
3) Ability to critically evaluate published research related to health management and health services research.
4) Expertise in one or more health services research specialties such as health policy, organization theory, long-term care policy, health economics, etc.
5) Practical knowledge of issues in research management including:

a) Formation and leadership of multidisciplinary teams.
b) Staffing, budgeting, tracking.
c) Data quality control and data safety management.
d) Funding mechanisms and grantsmanship.
e) Research ethics and regulations.

6) Professional quality peer-review, oral and poster presentation, report, grant, and manuscript writing.

Demonstration of Competency 1 is achieved by passing the doctoral qualifying examination and by successful completion and defense of the dissertation. Demonstration of Competencies 2 through 6, inclusive, is achieved by successful development, conduct, completion, and defense of the dissertation.

Admission

An applicant who has satisfactorily completed a Master of Public Health degree, or another relevant master degree or a health professional degree is considered for admission to the Public Health Management and Policy specialization. Applicants already holding an advanced degree are evaluated on the basis of appropriateness of previous coursework, training and experience. The graduate work by such applicants is reviewed on a case-by-case basis, and the applicant, if admitted, may be required to take additional course work prior to completing the minimum 48 credit hours required for post-master’s doctoral work.

The minimum required documentation for full admission must include:

  • Resume or curriculum vitae
  • A personal statement that is a clear, substantive one-page description of your professional and research experience as it relates to your goals in public health and the Ph.D. program.
  • Official transcript for each degree
  • Official GRE score
    • If applicant has no degree from accredited US institution, then only the GRE is acceptable
    • Requirement is waived if applicant has doctoral degree.
  • Three (3) letters of recommendation from individuals who have direct knowledge and experience with the applicant’s academic or professional work experience.
  • Official TOEFL score if applicant’s native language is not English and applicant has no degree from accredited U.S. institution.
  • Foreign credential evaluation for each degree not from an accredited U.S. institution
  • Admission interviews by the Ph.D. Committee are required and are in addition to your application for admission. An interview provides the Ph.D. Committee an additional source of information and perspective about your potential fit for the University of Louisville.

The following are recommended criteria for admission:

  • Undergraduate and graduate GPA each ≥ 3.0 on 4.0 scale
  • GRE performance recommended in 50th percentile or above for verbal and quantitative scores (Comparable scores on the MCAT or DAT are considered.)
  • If applicable, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score in 60th percentile or above

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Health Promotion

Introduction

The Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences, specialization in Health Promotion degree program at the University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences is designed to prepare students for careers in higher education, upper level management positions in government and private nonprofit health agencies, and research positions with universities, government agencies and in the private sector. In addition to gaining a solid foundation in the theories and concepts of the discipline, students also achieve competency as independent researchers.

Areas of research for faculty include emergency and disaster response and preparedness, health decision and risk analysis, infection prevention, preventive medicine, cognitive and social influences of health-related decision making on health outcomes, and policy and program evaluation.

Please refer to the Student Handbook for additional information.

Competencies

The successful student is able to demonstrate:

  • Advanced knowledge of behavioral and cognitive sciences related to public health education and promotion.
  • Expertise in planning, implementing, and evaluating theory-driven health promotion interventions in a variety of community and clinical settings.
  • Research, evaluation, scholarship and leadership skills that may be applied in higher education, government, and community health agencies.

It is expected that prior to graduation, students in the program have demonstrated these competencies by completing the curriculum, passing the qualifying exam, successfully defending the dissertation, participating in collaborative research and service projects with public health agencies, and serving as an instructor and mentor for master’s level and beginning doctoral students.

Competency in the basic principles and application of epidemiology is a requirement for all students in the School. If a student has not had sufficient exposure to epidemiology prior to matriculation, he or she is required to take a course in epidemiology as part of the program of study.

Admission

Applicants should have a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale and, in most cases, should have completed a master’s or other graduate degree related to the theme of the doctoral program. Applicants who have a master’s degree in a different discipline may be admitted with the stipulation that they complete foundation course work during their enrollment for the doctoral degree. This coursework is in addition to the outlined curriculum, and is negotiated with the student’s academic advisor on a case-by-case basis.

The formal application, curriculum vitae, personal statement, application fee, at least two letters of recommendation, official transcripts of all college work, and official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test must be submitted to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, Graduate Admissions at http://louisville.edu/graduatecatalog/application-and-admission. The personal statement should be a one-two page essay which discusses the student’s background in health promotion, why the student is attracted to the field, and how the degree helps the student reach his or her career goals. Students are recommended to score above the 50 percentile on the GRE. In addition, prior work experience relevant to the health promotion discipline is also considered as a factor in acceptance into the program. International students are required to submit TOEFL scores and a foreign credential evaluation of their transcripts. These are required no later than thirty days before the first day of classes of the semester in which the applicant plans to enroll.

For specific information about the degree concentration or the application process, students should contact the Director of the Ph.D. Program, Dr. Muriel Harris, at muriel.harris@louisville.edu or 502-852-4061, or the Department Chair, Dr. Richard Wilson, at richard.wilson@louisville.edu or 502-852-3443.

Curriculum

Curricular requirements for each Ph.D .Specialization follow:

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Environmental Health

Faculty Advisor

Upon admission to the Ph.D. specialization, each student is assigned a faculty advisor who works with the student to develop a program of study. The program of study recognizes core elements of environmental health as well as its breadth and multidisciplinary nature. At the Ph.D. level, this requires the selection of courses directly relevant to environmental health, such as biostatistics, epidemiology, molecular genetics, behavioral science, health policy/management, systems sciences, or other relevant areas of study.

Program of Study

Each doctoral student, in consultation with his or her academic advisor and the department chair, plans a program of study that uniquely fits the student’s career goals. The design of a doctoral program of study that reflects each student’s professional skills and research interest is the primary organizing principle of the proposed program.

Degree Requirements

The emphasis in doctoral training goes beyond accumulating course credit. Completion of the coursework is the prelude to sitting for the qualifying examination. Successful passage of the qualifying examination allows the student to enter doctoral candidacy. A doctoral candidate must then successfully develop and defend a dissertation proposal that describes an original and independent research project. Upon successful defense of the proposal, a student may then proceed to dissertation research. Upon successful completion of the research, defense of the dissertation, and demonstration of the required competencies listed below, a student is awarded the Ph.D. degree.

The Ph.D. specialization in Environmental Health is designed as a 39 credit hour program plus dissertation. Additional hours may be needed for completion of the specialization program.

Coursework

 

REQUIRED COURSEWORK

 

Course #

Course Title

Credit Hours

BIOC 645

Advanced Biochemistry I

4

BIOC 647

Advanced Biochemistry II

4

BIOC 668

Molecular Biology

4

PHEH 75X*

Seminars in Environmental Health

4

PHEP 602

Epidemiological Methods

3

PHST 620

Introduction to Statistical Computing

3

PHST 680

Biostatistical Methods I

3

PHTX 625

Scientific Writing

2

 

Elective Courses

12

Degree Total Credit Hours

39

*PHEH 750, 751, 752, 754: Students are required to complete the four seminars in environmental health for a total of four (4) credit hours but will continue to participate in the seminars until completion of their degree. Courses are jointly taught by the department faculty and are designed for a collegial experience providing an opportunity to integrate learning from other courses, discuss hot topics, brain-storm about research ideas, and acquire professional skills in scientific manuscript and grant writing, oral and poster presentations, grantsmanship, and peer-review.

Electives

As a part of the approved program of study, a student has the option to select 12 credit hours of elective coursework. Courses directly relevant to environmental health are preferred, including, but not limited to, biostatistics, bioinformatics, epidemiology, medical geography, molecular or population genetics, toxicology, microbiology, health services research, outcomes research, and health promotion and behavior. Courses may be selected from those offered within the School of Public Health and Information Sciences, other departments within the university, or from sources outside the university with permission and acceptance of credit by the program and dean.

Because the needs vary by research topic for which specific research methods and statistics skills, requirements in these area are difficult to define explicitly for all students. The student’s program of study utilizes electives to provide the student with the courses needed in his or her particular case.

A student may petition to take courses not on this list with approval of the instructor and the chair of the department. The student must provide a written rationale for the choices of elective coursework in his or her program of study.

APPROVED ELECTIVES

Course #

Course Title

Credit Hours

PHEH 753

Independent Study in Environmental and Occupational Health

1-3

PHST 650

Advanced Topics in Biostatistics

3

PHST 681

Biostatistical Methods II

3

PHPB 650

Advanced Topics in Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences

3

PHMS 650

Advanced Topics in Health Management and Systems Sciences

3

BIOC 611

Advanced Techniques in Biochemistry and Molecular Methods

3

BIOC 640

Principles of Biochemistry

3

BIOC 641

Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics

3

BIOC 660

Molecular Endocrinology

3

BIOC 668

Molecular Biology

3

BIO 670

Protein Structure and Function

3

BIOC 675

Cancer Biology

3

BIOL 522

Aquatic Ecology

3

BIOL 562

Ecosystem Ecology

3

BIOL 563

Population and Community Ecology

3

BIOL 660

Advanced Ecology of Urban and Suburban Landscapes

3

CEE 509

Environmental Processes and Systems

3

CEE 534

Industrial Waste Management

3

CEE 535

Solid Waste Management

3

CEE 574

Water and Wastewater Treatment

3

CEE 581

Environmental Impact Analysis

3

CEE 674

Water Resources Systems

3

CEE 675

Surface Water Quality Modeling

3

CHE 509

Environmental Processes and Systems

3

CHE 533

Chemical Engineering Safety and Health

3

CHE 534

Industrial Waste Management

3

CHE 535

Pollution Prevention

3

EXP 600

Physiology of Exercise

3

EXP 605

Human Physiology

3

GEOG 522

GIS and Public Health

3

GEOG 531

GIS and Urban Demographic Analysis

3

GEOG 561

Urban Environmental Quality

3

GEOG 656

Advanced Spatial Statistics in Applied Geography

3

GEOS 564

Hydrology

3

GEOS 565

Natural Hazards

3

MBIO 601

Molecular Microbiology

3

MBIO 602

Immunology

3

MBIO 618

Topics in Advanced Microbiology

3

MBIO 670

Molecular Virology

3

MBIO 680

Genetics of Infectious Diseases

3

MBIO 685

Microbial Physiology

3

MBIO 687

Microbial Pathogenesis

3

PHTX 607

Seminar in Genetics and Molecular Medicine

3

PHTX 618

Topics in Pharmacology & Toxicology

3

PHTX 641

Pharmacology I

3

PHTX 643

Toxicology I

3

PHTX 661

Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicology

3

PHZB 605

Systemic Physiology I

3

PHZB 611

Advanced Human Cardiovascular Physiology

3

UPA 678

Land Use and Planning Law

3

UPA 679

Environmental Policy

3

UPA 687

Environmental Policy and Natural Hazards

3

Qualifying Examination

Upon completion of the majority of the required coursework for the Ph.D. (typically after the second year of coursework), the student is eligible to sit for the doctoral qualifying examination. The timing and eligibility for the qualifying examination is determined by the student’s faculty advisor and department chair. Students must take the exam within three months of the completion of all courses for the Ph.D. program. A student who does not successfully complete the exam may be required to take additional or remedial coursework. The student is allowed one opportunity to retake the exam no more than six months after the initial exam and at a date mutually agreed upon by the faculty and student. Successful completion of the examination admits the student to doctoral candidacy (DOCT 600) until the completion of their dissertation.

Dissertation

A dissertation is required of a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health Sciences with a Specialization in Environmental Health. It is to be a scholarly achievement in research, and should demonstrate a thorough understanding of research techniques in environmental health and the ability to conduct independent research. The dissertation must follow the guidelines of the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies located athttp://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information.

Dissertation Committee

The dissertation shall be reviewed by a reading committee, chaired by the student’s faculty advisor, and appointed by the dean upon the advice of the chair of the department. If faculty advisor is from an allied department, the EOHS department chair will co-chair the committee. This committee shall consist of a minimum of four members, and must include one representative of an allied department or school. The dissertation must be approved by the committee and the chair of the department.

Dissertation Proposal

A student who successfully completes the qualifying exam must submit a written dissertation proposal to all members of the dissertation committee. The student is then orally examined on the dissertation proposal.

Dissertation Preparation

The dissertation is to be prepared in format and binding according to the guidelines established by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, available at http://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information.

Dissertation Approval

The dissertation is to be submitted in completed form to the chair of the department at least thirty days before the end of the term in which the candidate expects to be graduated. The candidate is not eligible for final examination until the dissertation has been accepted by the committee and chair. The dissertation committee schedules an oral defense by the candidate and notifies the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies using the form available at http://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information. The time and place for the defense is published by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies to the general academic community, members of which are free to attend the defense. The dissertation is approved by a majority vote of the committee and the concurrence of the department chair.

Dissertation Submission

The following steps must be taken to submit the final copy of the dissertation electronically after oral defense and approval of the committee:

  1. Final document must be converted to a PDF (following the guidelines as noted above) and sent to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies and the department’s administrative assistant.

2. Submit as advised by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies through the ThinkIR repository.
3. The signature page within the electronic version must have the names of your committee members typed under the signature line; the signatures cannot be scanned into the document.

4. Submit a signed signature page on white paper, with original signatures, to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, attention Courtney Kerr.

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Epidemiology

Faculty Advisor

Upon admission to the specialization, each student is assigned a faculty advisor who works with the student to develop a program of study.

Program of Study

The program of study recognizes core elements of modern epidemiology as well as its breadth and multidisciplinary nature. This requires the selection of a minor field of specialization, such as biostatistics, environmental science, molecular genetics, behavioral science, health management and systems sciences, clinical research, or another relevant area of study, and the completion of at least six (6) credit hours of coursework in this field.

Degree Requirements

The emphasis in doctoral training goes beyond accumulating course credit. The coursework is organized into two blocks of 24 credit hours each. Completion of the first block of coursework is prerequisite for sitting for the proficiency examination. After passing the proficiency examination, the student can proceed with the second block of coursework. Successful completion of the second block is prerequisite to sitting for the candidacy examination. After passing the candidacy examination, the student is admitted to doctoral candidacy. A doctoral candidate must then successfully develop and defend a dissertation proposal that describes an original and independent research project. Upon successful defense of the proposal, the student may then proceed to dissertation research. Upon successful completion of the research, oral defense of the dissertation, and demonstration of the required competencies listed above, the student is awarded the Ph.D. degree.

The Ph.D. specialization in Epidemiology is designed to consist of 50 credit hours of coursework over a minimum of two years plus one to four years for completion of the dissertation. The coursework outlined below represents an ideal sequence for a full-time student. A part-time student may need to deviate from this sequence. As part of the first block, a student is expected to complete required courses in basic and advanced epidemiologic methods that cover core areas including study design, research management, and statistical analysis; the survey course in disease biology and pathophysiology; and a minimum of six (6) credit hours of epidemiology seminars. The student must pass the proficiency examination before proceeding to minor electives and individual studies in the second block, which must include an additional three (3) credit hours of epidemiology seminars. Exceptions may be granted upon approval by the student’s advisor and the department chair.

Coursework

50 total credit hours (beyond admission requirements) consisting of the following:

11 credit hours of required courses
9 credit hours of seminars in epidemiology
18-21 credit hours of epidemiology and biostatistics electives
6 credit hours of minor electives (outside of epidemiology)
3-6 credit hours of mentored readings and research in epidemiology

Required Coursework

Semester

Course #

Course Title

Credit Hours

Block 1

Fall I

PHEP 618

-OR-

PHEP xxx

Epidemiologic Methods II

-OR if already taken -

Epidemiology elective

3

PHEP 648

Data Management and Analysis for Epidemiology I B1

1

PHEP 622

Population Pathology B1

3

PHEP xxx

-OR-

PHST xxx

Epidemiology elective

-OR-

Biostatistics elective

3

PHEP 750

Seminars in Epidemiology B1

3

Semester total credit hours

13

 

Spring I

PHEP 701

Advanced Epidemiologic Methods B1

3

PHEP 649

Data Management and Analysis for Epidemiology II B1

1

PHEP 702

Epidemiologic Research Management B1

3

PHEP xxx

-OR-

PHST xxx

Epidemiology elective

-OR-

Biostatistics elective

3

PHEP 750

Seminars in Epidemiology B1

3

Semester total credit hours

13

Block 1 total credit hours

26

 

Required Coursework

Semester

Course #

Course Title

Credit Hours

Block 2

Fall II

PHEP xxx

Epidemiology elective

3

PHEP xxx

-OR-

various

Epidemiology elective

-OR-

Minor elective

3

various

Minor elective

3

PHEP 750

Seminars in Epidemiology B2

3

 

Semester total credit hours

12

 

Spring II

PHEP xxx

Epidemiology elective

3

Two of:

PHEP xxx

various

PHEP 778

Two of:

Epidemiology elective

Minor Elective

Readings and Research in Epidemiology

6

(3 each)

PHEP 778

Readings and Research in Epidemiology B2

3

 

Semester total credit hours

12

 

Block 2 Total Credit Hours

24

 

Degree Total Credit Hours

50

Key:
B1 = required in Block 1

B2 = required in Block 2

Minor Elective Requirement

As a part of the approved program of study, the student is required to complete six (6) credit hours of coursework in a minor field of specialization. Areas directly relevant to the science of epidemiology are preferred, including, but not limited to, biostatistics, bioinformatics, medical geography, molecular or population genetics, environmental health, toxicology, microbiology, health management, health promotion and behavioral science, and clinical research. These courses may be selected from ones offered within the school, other departments within the university, or from sources outside the university with permission and acceptance of credit by the school and university.

Minor courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with his or her advisor and the respective course directors. Students may petition to take courses not on this list with approval of the instructor, program director, and the chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health. The student must provide a written rationale for the choice of minor coursework in the program of study. The following is a partial list of approved minor courses. Some courses may have prerequisites, and the student is expected to either meet these or obtain permission from the instructor before registering.

Approved Electives for Minor Requirement

Course #

Course Title

Credit Hours

BIOC 641

Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics

3

BIOC 660

Molecular Endocrinology

3

BIOC 661

Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicology (cross-listed as PHTX-661)

3

BIOC 668

Molecular Biology

3

BIOC 675

Cancer Biology

3

EXP 600

Physiology of Exercise

3

EXP 605

Human Physiology

3

GEOG 656

Advanced Spatial Statistics in Applied Geography

3

MBIO 687

Microbial Pathogenesis

3

MBIO 618

Topics in Advanced Microbiology

3

MBIO 680

Genetics of Infectious Diseases

3

NURS 670

Cancer Epidemiology and Pathophysiology

3

PHPH 610

New Drug and Device Development

2

PHST 624

Clinical Trials I

2

PHST 625

Clinical Trials II

2

PHPH 632

Ethical Conduct of Health Care Research

2

PHEH 650

Advanced Topics in Environmental and Occupational Health

3

PHMS 650

Advanced Topics in Health Management and Systems Science

3

PHPB 650

Advanced Topics in Health Promotion and Behavioral Science

1-3

PHST 650

Advanced Topics in Biostatistics

3

PHST 680

Biostatistical Methods I

3

PHST 681

Biostatistical Methods II

3

PHST 661

Probability

3

PHST 662

Mathematical Statistics

3

PHST 683

Survival Analysis

3

PHST 682

Multivariate Statistical Analysis

3

PHST 684

Categorical Data Analysis

3

PHST 750

Statistics for Bioinformatics

3

PHST 751

High-throughput Data Analysis

3

PHST 785

Nonlinear Regression

3

PHTX 607

Seminar in Genetics and Molecular Medicine

3

PHTX 618

Topics in Pharmacology & Toxicology

3

PHTX 661

Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicology (cross-listed as BIOC 661)

3

PHZB 605

Systemic Physiology I

3

PHZB 611

Advanced Human Cardiovascular Physiology

3

Proficiency Examination

Upon successful completion of the first block of required coursework, the student is eligible to sit for the written proficiency examination, which is administered by a committee of departmental faculty appointed by the chair. The timing of the proficiency examination is determined by the student’s faculty advisor and the department chair. The subject matter includes basic knowledge of disease biology and pathophysiology; theory and skills in epidemiologic research methods, including study design and management; and quantitative analytic methods. A student who does not successfully pass the proficiency examination is allowed a second opportunity to pass the exam. Failing the proficiency examination the second time results in dismissal from the program.

Candidacy Examination

After passing the proficiency examination and upon completion of the second block of coursework, the student is eligible to sit for the written and oral candidacy examination, which is administered by a committee appointed by the department chair and composed of graduate faculty. The subject matter includes knowledge of advanced epidemiologic methods; specialized knowledge pertaining to the minor field of specialization; disease biology and pathophysiology, which may be tailored to the student’s special area of interest; and knowledge of the research process. Successful passage of the candidacy examination admits the student to doctoral candidacy. A student who does not successfully pass the candidacy examination may be required to take additional or remedial coursework and is allowed a second opportunity to pass the exam. Failing the candidacy examination the second time results in dismissal from the program.

Dissertation

A dissertation is required of every candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health Sciences with a specialization in Epidemiology. The dissertation is a scholarly achievement in research and presents an original contribution to knowledge. It should demonstrate a thorough understanding of research techniques in epidemiology and the ability to conduct independent research. The following sections summarize the basic requirements for the dissertation committee, dissertation proposal, and defense. Additional details are available in the department’s document “Student Advising, Thesis and Dissertation Committees.”

Dissertation Committee

The dissertation is read by a dissertation committee, chaired by the student’s faculty advisor and appointed by the Dean of the school on the recommendation of the program director and chair of the department. The committee consists of at least four members and must include one representative of an allied department. The dissertation must be approved by the committee and the chair of the department.

Dissertation Proposal

After successful completion of the qualifying examination, a doctoral candidate must submit a written dissertation proposal to the members of the dissertation committee. The candidate is then orally examined on the dissertation proposal.

Dissertation Preparation

The dissertation is prepared with the format and binding according to the guidelines of the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, available at http://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information.

Dissertation Approval

The dissertation is submitted in completed form to the chair of the department at least thirty days before the end of the term in which the candidate expects to be graduated, and the candidate is not eligible for final examination until the dissertation has been received by the committee and chair.

The dissertation committee schedules an oral defense by the candidate. The time and place for the defense is published to the general academic community, members of which are free to attend the defense. The dissertation is approved by a majority vote of the committee and the concurrence of the department chair.

Dissertation Submission

The following steps must be taken to submit the final copy of the dissertation electronically after oral defense and approval of the committee:

1. Final document must be converted to a PDF (following the guidelines as noted above) and sent to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies and the department’s administrative assistant.
2. Submit as advised by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies through the ThinkIR repository.
3. The signature page within the electronic version must have the names of your committee members typed under the signature line; the signatures cannot be scanned into the document.
4. Submit a signed signature page on white paper, with original signatures, to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, attention Courtney Kerr.

A copy of the final, signed dissertation must also be deposited with the department office.

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Public Health Management and Policy

Each doctoral student, in consultation with his or her academic advisor and the HMSS Ph.D. Committee, plans a course of study that uniquely fits the student’s career goals. The design of a doctoral program of study that reflects each student’s professional skills and research interest is the primary organizing principle of the proposed program.

The emphasis in doctoral training goes beyond accumulating course credit. Completion of the coursework is the prelude to sitting for the qualifying examination. Successful passage of this qualifying examination allows the student to enter candidacy. A doctoral candidate must then successfully develop and defend a dissertation proposal that describes an original and independent research project. Upon successful defense of the proposal, a student then proceeds to dissertation research. Upon successful completion of the research, defense of the dissertation, and demonstration of the required competencies listed above, a student is awarded the Ph.D. degree.

The Ph.D. specialization in Health Management is designed as a 48 credit hour program (minimum beyond a master’s degree) and the dissertation. Depending on the student’s previous educational experience, additional hours may be needed for completion of the specialization program.

Faculty Advisor

Upon admission to the Ph.D. specialization, each student is assigned a faculty advisor who works with the student to develop a program of study.

HMSS Ph.D. Committee

The purpose of the HMSS Ph.D. Committee is to oversee the overall quality of doctoral education within HMSS. The committee will (1) annually review the progress of Ph.D. students within curriculum; (2) manage the qualifying exam process; (3) approve dissertation committee composition; (4) approve preliminary dissertation proposals to move to the proposal defense stage; and (5) make curriculum quality improvement recommendations to the HMSS faculty for their approval.

Program of Study

The program of study incorporates a foundation of courses intricate to health services research and healthcare management as well as addressing its multidisciplinary nature. At the Ph.D. level, this requires that students take health management and theoretical foundation, health management research methods, and HMSS Ph.D. seminar courses, and an emphasis area providing in depth knowledge related to effectively managing the resources necessary to carrying out the mission of improving access, cost, and quality within the healthcare system.

The student works with his or her faculty advisor to develop a specific program of study for the student’s coursework based on the required coursework and emphasis area (see Coursework, below). The student’s individualized program of study must be approved by the student, faculty advisor, and the HMSS Ph.D. Committee.

Degree Requirements

The emphasis in doctoral training goes beyond accumulating course credit. Completion of the coursework is the prelude to sitting for the qualifying examination. Successful passage of the qualifying examination allows the student to enter doctoral candidacy. A doctoral candidate must then successfully develop and present to the HMSS Ph.D. Committee a preliminary dissertation proposal (PDP) that describes to the dissertation committee what the student wishes to accomplish with the dissertation and an original and independent research project in the prescribed format. Once the PDP is approved by the HMSS Ph.D. Committee, the student may schedule the proposal defense. Upon successful defense of the proposal, a student may then proceed to dissertation research. Upon successful completion of the research, defense of the dissertation, and demonstration of the required competencies listed after, a student is awarded the Ph.D. degree.

The Ph.D. specialization in Public Health Management and Policy is designed as a 48 credit hour program (minimum beyond a master’s degree) and the dissertation. Additional hours may be needed for completion of the specialization program.

Coursework

48 total credit hours

  • 30 credit hours of required coursework
  • 3 credit hours of public health management seminars
  • 15 credit hours within an emphasis area

Some required or emphasis area courses may require additional credit hours in prerequisite courses not already taken by the student. The specific coursework for a student is established with the student’s individualized program of study (see Program of Study, above).

Required Coursework

Area

Course #

Course Title

Credit Hours

Core Areas (33 credit hours minimum)

Health Management Foundations

(9 credit hours)

PHMS 700

Introduction to Health Services Research

3

PHMS 715

Health Policy Research

3

PHMS 708

Population Health & Health Disparities

3

Theoretical Foundations

(3 credit hours)

PHMS 720

Organization Theory in HSR

3

ENTR-780

Special Topics: Economic Theory of the Firm

3

Health Management Research Methods

(18 credit hours)

SOC 618

Qualitative Field Research Methods

3

PHST 650

Advanced Topics in Biostatistics

3

PHST 680

Biostatistical Methods I

3

PHST-681

Biostatistical Methods II

3

PHMS 645

Health Services Research Methods I

3

PHMS 646

Health Services Research Methods II

3

PHMS 725

Economic Evaluation in Healthcare

3

Seminars

(3 credit hours)

PHMS 751

HMSS PhD Seminar 1

1

PHMS 752

HMSS PhD Seminar 2

1

PHMS 753

HMSS PhD Seminar 3

1

HMSS Ph.D. Seminars

A student in the Ph.D. specialization in Health Management is required to complete at least three credit hours in the HMSS Ph.D. Seminar (PHMS 751, 752, 753). These group courses are jointly taught by the faculty of the department and are designed to provide a collegial experience that provides an opportunity to integrate learning from other courses, discuss hot topics, brain-storm about research ideas, and acquire professional skills in scientific manuscript and grant writing, oral and poster presentations, grantsmanship, and peer review.

Emphasis Area

As a part of the approved program of study, a student is able to select 15 credit hours of elective coursework that is structured around a specific area within public health. For example, students could choose to do an emphasis area in long-term care policy, population health, global health, etc. Courses may be selected from those offered within the school, other schools or colleges within the university, or from sources outside the university with permission and acceptance of credit by the school and university.

Emphasis areas need to be submitted by each student by the end of the second semester in the Program. Because some courses are only offered every other year, the student and the faculty advisor must plan the emphasis area sequence as soon as reasonably possible.

All emphasis areas need to be first approved by a student’s advisor and then presented to the HMSS Ph.D. Committee for approval. The HMSS Ph.D. Committee will review the chosen courses and confirm that they contribute to an overall expertise within the emphasis area designated by the student. The student must provide a written rationale for the choices of elective coursework in his or her emphasis area. These can be tweaked an changed while the student is in the program. However, these changes must also be approved by the HMSS Ph.D. Committee.

Emphasis Area Examples

Course #

Organizational Systems

CreditHours

PADM 600

Public Administration & Organizational Theory

3

PHMS 615

Introduction to Health Systems

3

PHMS 655

Systems Thinking and Dynamic Modeling in Public Health

3

PHMS 605

Governance and Management of Healthcare Organizations

3

SOC 725

Organization Theory

3

HSR Methods

PHMS 725

Economic Evaluation in Health Care

3

PHST 704

Mixed Effects Models and Longitudinal Data Analysis

3

PHST 785

Nonlinear Regression

3

POLS- 671

Methods of Political Research

3

SW 773-01

Advanced Measurement in Social Work Research

3

Health Policy

SOC 625

Social Policy

3

POLS 670

Scope of Political Science

3

POLS 671

Methods of Political Research

3

PADM 606

Public Policy

3

PHMS 710

Health Policy & Analysis

3

Qualifying Examination

Upon completion of the required coursework (a minimum of 30 credit hours not including 15 credit hours of emphasis area course work) and public health management seminars (3 credit hours total) for the Ph.D., the student is eligible to sit for the qualifying examination. The components of the qualifying exam focus on the subject matter drawn from foundation courses and health management research methods. The timing and eligibility for the qualifying exams are determined by the student’s faculty advisor and the HMSS PhD Committee. Successful completion of the exam admits the student to doctoral candidacy. A student who does not successfully complete the exam may be required to take additional or remedial coursework and is allowed one opportunity to retake the exam. After admission into candidacy, the student will still be responsible for completing the additional 15 credit hours of required emphasis area coursework.

Dissertation

A dissertation is required of a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health Sciences with a specialization in Public Health Management and Policy. It is to be a scholarly achievement in research, and should demonstrate a thorough understanding of research techniques in health management and the ability to conduct independent research. All dissertations use a three-paper format.

Dissertation Committee

The dissertation shall be read by a reading committee, chaired by the student’s faculty advisor, and appointed by the dean of the school upon the advice of HMSS Ph.D. Committee. This committee shall consist of at least four members and must include one representative of an allied department. The dissertation must be approved by the committee and the chair of the department.

The composition of the dissertation committee must be reviewed and approved by the HMSS Ph.D. Committee. This is done as part of the preliminary dissertation proposal (PDP) process.

Preliminary Dissertation Proposal

The Preliminary Dissertation Proposal (PDP) process involves a student (1) forming the dissertation committee; (2) writing a preliminary dissertation proposal using the PDP format; (3) submitting the PDP to an outside reviewer for comment (the HMSS PhD Committee will identify the outside reviewer); (4) the dissertation chair will present the PDP to the HMSS Ph.D. Committee; and (5) the HMSS Ph.D. Committee will provide feedback and approve the PDP to move to the proposal defense stage. Students may not move to the proposal defense stage without HMSS Ph.D. Committee approval of the PDP.

The PDP uses the AHRQ (NIH) research proposal format. This is the general outline students should follow when constructing a PDP:

Page Limit Overview

 

Single-spaced

Double-spaced

Coversheet and Student Letter

3

6

Specific Aims

1

2

Research Strategy

6

12

Total

10

20

Sections

I. Coversheet and Student Letter (3 pages, single-spaced)

  • Project Title
  • Student’s Name
  • Chair of committee, committee members, and GSR – provide each member’s area of expertise related to the dissertation. Put line next to each name for signature of approval.
  • Areas of knowledge – identify areas of knowledge (content and methods) necessary for successful completion of dissertation. Discuss how these have been met or will be met through courses, independent study, etc.
  • Student letter – should discuss career goals, background, and interest in health services research, and the anticipated manner in which the proposed dissertation will contribute to career goals. List source of funding for research.

II. Specific Aims (1 page) – Also list specific hypotheses for each aim. If desired, overall purpose of this line of investigation may be mentioned in order to indicate the long-term importance of the specific important being sought through this study.

III. Research strategy (6 pages) – Section III’s format may be tailored to meet the needs of the specific study being proposed. It could be organized for the study as a whole, for each specific aim, or for each paper to be written. However, the following sub-headings usually apply (major methods should be referenced).

  • Significance – Explain the importance of the problem or critical barrier to progress in the field that the proposed project addresses. Explain how the proposed project will advance the field and improve scientific knowledge, technical capability, and/or clinical practice in one or more broad fields. Describe how the concepts, methods, technologies, treatments, services, or preventative interventions that drive this field will be changed if the proposed aims are achieved.
  • Innovation – Explain how the application challenges and seeks to shift current research or clinical practice paradigms. Describe any novel theoretical concepts, approaches, or methodologies, instrumentation or interventions to be developed or used, and any advantage over existing methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions. Explain any refinements, improvements, or new applications of theoretical concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions.
  • Approach - Describe the overall strategy, methodology, and analyses to be used to accomplish the specific aims of the project. Include how the data will be collected, analyzed, and interpreted as well as any resource sharing plans as appropriate. Discuss the potential difficulties and limitations of the proposed procedures and alternative approaches to achieve the aims. As part of this section, provide a tentative sequence or timetable for the project.
    Use this section to provide an account of the student’s or committee’s preliminary studies pertinent to the proposed study, summarizing methods and preliminary findings. Relevant publications or manuscripts may be attached in the Appendix. If there are no preliminary studies, please indicate so in a sentence.

IV. Protection of Human Subjects

V. AHRQ Priority Populations

  • n/a

VI. References Cited

VII. Appendix

  • Survey instrument, if applicable

Dissertation Proposal

Once approved by the HMSS Ph.D. Committee, the candidate will submit a written dissertation proposal to all members of the dissertation committee. The candidate is then orally examined on the dissertation proposal at a time scheduled by the candidate in consultation with the committee chair and full dissertation committee.

Dissertation Preparation

The dissertation is to be prepared in format and binding according to the guidelines of the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies. The guidelines can be reviewed at the following link: http://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information/thesis-dissertation-guidelines-1. HMSS PhD students do a three-paper dissertation.

Three-Paper Dissertation Guidelines

Students will write a three-paper dissertation. The dissertation will include a brief introduction to the three papers and how they fit together (roughly 10 pages). The research questions submitted and approved within the dissertation proposal will define the subject matter for each of the papers in the dissertation.

Prior to the dissertation defense, at least one of the three-papers in the dissertation must be submitted for review to a reputable peer-reviewed journal that is agreed upon by the doctoral candidate’s dissertation committee. The remaining two papers must be of high enough quality that the dissertation committee feels that they can be submitted to a reputable journal, although they do not need to be submitted prior to the dissertation defense.

Each paper must report on original scholarship and address the research questions in the dissertation proposal. One of the papers may consist of a literature synthesis which leads to specification of a conceptual framework for addressing a research question or questions.

Prior to the dissertation defense, the student must specify a target peer-reviewed journal for each and format each according to the chosen journals formatting rules. Each paper is expected to conform to the length requirements for the chosen peer-reviewed journal (typically 25-30 pages in length). Co-authors for each paper should be acknowledged in a “Statement of Contributors” but not included as authors in the dissertation itself. They can be listed as authors when the papers are submitted for publication, but not as authors in the dissertation itself.

The following information is in the current guidelines, please review and advise if you have additional questions or concerns. The information is as follows:

Published Work

With the approval of your adviser and your thesis or dissertation committee, you may include part or all of the content of manuscripts published in or accepted for publication by scholarly journals and proceedings as chapters in your thesis or dissertation. If you choose this option, you must:

  1. Be a primary author—i.e., lead author—of the articles (i.e., a person principally involved in the data selection or collection, the data analysis or interpretation, and the writing of the papers).
  2. Obtain the needed copyright clearance from the publisher—i.e., a letter granting permission to include the journal article in your thesis or dissertation.
  3. Include a proper citation to the work, either a footnote or a citation in the reference section of the thesis or dissertation.
  4. Format the work so that it conforms to the requirements as specified in “Guidelines for the Preparation and Processing of Theses and Dissertations” (The Guidelines). In other words, the journal publication cannot simply be pasted into the thesis or dissertation in its published format.

The content and format of each paper included may be similar to or the same as what you submit to the journal/proceedings, except the content must comply with the formatting requirements as outlined in The Guidelines. The bibliography or reference section of each article must become part of the final Reference Section in the thesis and dissertation, as stipulated in The Guidelines. There should be only one abstract and one list of acknowledgments for the thesis or dissertation.

If the publisher grants permission for the publication to be used, the publisher will give instructions on how the approval should be documented in the thesis/dissertation. The publisher’s official notice of approval must be formatted accordingly and added as an Appendix. Permission to use previously published material in a thesis or dissertation doesn't necessarily give the student permission to sell that material. The student may need to put a restriction on the sale and availability of his/her work according to the publisher's guidelines.

Dissertation Approval

The dissertation is to be submitted in completed form to the chair of the department at least thirty days before the end of the term in which the candidate expects to be graduated, and the candidate is not eligible for final defense until the dissertation has been accepted by the committee and chair.

The doctoral candidate will prepare a dissertation document that will include:

(1) An introduction of at least 10 pages that summarizes the three papers.
(2) The papers themselves (refer to Published Work above).
(3) A synthesis section at the end that addresses the implications for practice and research, in non-technical terms, to the extent not addressed in the separate papers.
(4) Any additional material, as appendices, that would not usually be part of a journal article (e.g. a survey instrument) but which the dissertation committee deems relevant.
(5) Statement of contributions: a statement specifying his/her role and those of others in selecting study questions, deigning analyses, identifying appropriate methods, analyzing the data, and writing and reviewing the papers. This statement will be signed by each contributor named.
(6) Dissemination plan: this will specify the target peer-reviewed journal for each of the three papers. For each paper that has not been submitted for publication, the student is required to obtain a signature from a faculty member with experience publishing or reviewing for the target journal (or similar ones). The faculty member will sign a statement to the effect that in his/her opinion, the paper is potentially publishable in the journal selected (these signatures will be required by the conclusion of the dissertation defense).

The oral defense is scheduled by the dissertation committee and doctoral candidate. The time and place for the defense is published to the general academic community, members of which are free to attend the defense. The dissertation is approved by a majority vote of the committee and the concurrence of the department chair.

Evaluation by Dissertation Committee

Dissertations will be evaluated by the dissertation committee using the following criteria:

Extent of the student's contribution. The committee should be persuaded that the student played the primary role in the formulation and write-up of the research for all three papers. For example, if a faculty member provided the data, selected the methodology and directed the analyses, the student's role may not meet the required standard of independence.

Eventual publication of the three papers. The committee should only approve the dissertation if it feels that the three papers are potentially publishable, that is, ready for submission to peer-­reviewed journals. Faculty endorsement of the Dissemination Plan will be relevant for this.

Papers published before the final defense are acceptable as described below. In some cases, one or more of the papers may have already been accepted or published by a peer-reviewed journal at the time of the defense. While this satisfies the publication criterion, the committee will still need to evaluate the paper(s) in light of the other criteria, and the paper(s) will need to be reformatted to meet SIGS requirements.

Dissertation Distribution

The following steps must be taken to submit the final copy of the thesis electronically after oral defense and approval of the committee:

1. Final document must be converted to a PDF (following the guidelines as noted above) and sent to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies and the department’s administrative assistant.
2. Submit to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies as advised by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies Thesis/Dissertation Information web page: http://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information/thesis-dissertation-information

- For questions regarding preparation and submission of dissertations to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, contact the Courtney Kerr.

Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences Specialization in Health Promotion

The typical progression through the health promotion curriculum is:

  • Program of Study (year 1)
  • Required and elective coursework of 48 credit-hours (years 1 and 2)
  • Qualifying examination (year 2)
  • Candidacy
  • Dissertation research and preparation (within 4 years of entering candidacy)
  • Oral examination / dissertation defense

Faculty Advisor

The Director of the Ph.D. program will assign advisors for each doctoral student. Upon matriculation in the program, each student will meet with his or her assigned advisor and develop a program of study, which will include courses in public health theory and principles, research design and statistics as well as selected cognate courses. The program of study will identify a set of courses for the development of competencies in areas of public health knowledge that are relevant to the student’s area of interest. The program of study may be modified as the student’s needs change or course availability is altered.

Program of Study

Upon matriculation in the program, each student meets with his or her assigned advisor and develops a program of study that includes courses in research design and statistics as well as selected cognate courses. The program of study may be modified as the student’s needs change or course availability is altered.

If a student has not had sufficient exposure to epidemiology prior to matriculation, he or she is required to take a course in epidemiology as part of the program of study. In addition the program of study includes development of competencies in other areas of public health knowledge that are relevant to the student’s area of interest.

Degree Requirements

Coursework

Students with a Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) and those with master’s degrees from other disciplines may be admitted to the Ph.D. program. For those students entering from other disciplines, leveling courses will be required. The leveling courses include the M.P.H. core courses, and they must be completed prior to beginning courses in the student’s Ph.D. degree plan.

The Ph.D. curriculum consists of a minimum of 48 credit hours, at least one semester of teaching, and a dissertation. The degree plan consists of the following:

Foundational Requirements (15-18 credit hours)

Epidemiological Methods (3 credit hours)
Theory, Approaches, Planning, & Interventions (6-9 credit hours)
Advanced Evaluation (3 credit hours)
Policy & Politics (3 credit hours)

Methods & Statistical Analysis (18-24 credit hours)

Advanced Biostatistics (3 credit hours)
Measurement (3 credit hours)
Quantitative Research Methods (3-9 credit hours)
Qualitative Research Methods (3-9 credit hours)

Teaching (3 credit hours)

Cognate Area of Study (12-15 credit hours)
To be determined with faculty advisor

Dissertation

FOUNDATIONAL REQUIREMENTS [15-18 credit hours]

Course

Title-Description

Credit Hours

Epidemiological Methods

PHEP 602

-OR-

PHEP 618

Epidemiologic Methods

-OR-

Epidemiologic Methods II

3

Theory/Applied Theory/Approaches/Planning/Interventions

PHPB 701

Theoretical Basis of Health Promotion

3

PHPB 704

Psycho-Social Foundations of Health Decision Making

3

PHPB 705

Community Organization and Health Policy Advocacy

3

HSS 669

Administering Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Programs

3

Advanced Evaluation

PHPB 615

Advanced Program Evaluation

3

Policy & Politics

PHPB 702

Health Care Law and Politics

3

METHODS & STATISTICAL ANALYSIS [18-24 credit hours]

Course

Title-Description

Credit Hours

Advanced Biostatistics (3 credit hours)

PHST 630

Applied Statistical Methods

3

PSYC 610

Advanced Statistics I

3

SOC 609

Seminar in Statistics I

3

Measurement (3 credit hours)

PHST 645

Health Sciences Data Collection Instrumentation

3

ECPY 540

Evaluation and Measurement in Education

3

ECPY 740

Psychometrics and Affective Instrument Development

3

ELFH 602

Survey Research and Attitude Measurement

3

Quantitative Research Methods (3-9 credit hours)

ECPY 745

Systematic Reviewing and Meta-Analysis

3

ECPY 746

Secondary Data Analysis

3

ECPY 764/ ELFH 764

Structural Equation Modeling

3

ECPY 765/ ELFH 765

Hierarchical Linear Modeling

3

ECPY 793

Doctoral Seminar in Educational and Counseling Psychology

3

ELFH 601

Applied Statistics

3

ELFH 700

Research Concepts and Design

3

ELFH 701

Intermediate Applied Statistics

3

ELFH 702

Applied Multiple Regression

3

ELFH 703

Multivariate Educational Statistics

3

PHPB 703

Health Promotion Research Methods and Design

3

PHPH 610

New Drug and Device Development

3

PHPH 630

Geographic Information Systems in Public Health

3

PHST 630

Applied Statistical Methods

3

PHST 640

Statistical Methods for Research Design in Health Sciences

3

PHST 680

Biostatistical Methods I

3

PHST 681

Biostatistical Methods II

3

PHST 682

Multivariate Statistical Analysis

3

PHST 684

Categorical Data Analysis

3

PHST 704

Mixed Effect Models and Longitudinal Data Analysis

3

PHST 781

Advanced Linear Models

3

PHST 782

Generalized Linear Models

3

PHST 785

Non-Linear Regression

3

PSYC 611

Advanced Statistics II

3

PSYC 612

Advanced Statistics III

3

SOC 610

Seminar in Statistics II

3

SOC 615

Seminar in Research Methodology

3

SOC 616

Advanced Multivariate Modeling

3

Qualitative Research Methods (3-9 credit hours)

PHPB XXX

PhotoVoice Methodology

3

PHPB 710

Community-Based Participatory Research

3

PHPB 711

Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health

3

ELFH 704

Qualitative Field Research Methods

3

ELFH 705

Qualitative Data Analysis and Representation

3

SOC 618

Qualitative Field Research Methods

3

TEACHING [3 credit hours]

 

Course

Title-Description

Credit Hours

Seminar-Based Courses

ELFH 683

-OR-

ELFH 607

-OR-

ELFH 672

-OR-

ELFH 661

-OR-

EDAP 607

College Teaching

-OR-

Principles of Educational Leadership

-OR-

Instructional Design and Development

-OR-

Adult and Organizational Learning

-OR-

Teacher Leadership in Practice

3

Practice

Undergraduate/Graduate Teaching Experience

COGNATE: 12-15 credit hours; courses to be determined with guidance from advisor based on area student chooses to develop content expertise

DISSERTATION: hours as needed

Qualifying Examination (See Student Handbook for additional information.)

Upon completion of all formal course work, typically at the end of the second year of coursework, students will take a written qualifying exam to demonstrate their ability to synthesize and apply concepts from those courses. Results will be given to students within six weeks of completion of the exam. The exam will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis; students who don’t pass the exam on their first attempt will be given time to prepare to sit for the exam one additional time. The retake of the exam must be attempted within six months at a regularly scheduled exam date (February, July or October) following the first attempt at the discretion of the specialization and in consultation with the student. If a student fails to pass on the second attempt, the student will be dropped from the program. Once the qualifying exam is successfully completed, students will be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Dissertation (See Student Handbook for additional information.)

A dissertation, based on original research conducted by the student, is required of a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health Sciences with a specialization in Health Promotion. The dissertation is to be a scholarly achievement that demonstrates the student’s ability to conduct independent research and a thorough understanding of research principles, concepts and techniques in health promotion. The dissertation must follow the guidelines of the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies located athttp://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information.

Dissertation Committee

The student’s dissertation research will be guided by, and the final product approved by, a Dissertation Committee. The Chair of the Committee, who must come from within the department, will be appointed by the Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies upon the advice of the Chair of the Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences.

The Dissertation Committee shall consist of at least four members to a maximum of six members. The Chair of the Committee and at least one other committee member must from the department. Additional members should be from outside of the department or school. Students are encouraged to meet with their committee chair regarding prospective committee members who will mentor them throughout this process. A committee member must have a doctoral degree, be credentialed to teach graduate-level courses relevant to the degree, and have recent involvement in research, scholarship, or creative activity within the previous five years. The Dean of Academic Affairs at SPHIS must approve the members to serve on the committee.

Dissertation Proposal

The student will work with the Dissertation Committee, and especially with the Chair throughout the process of preparing their Dissertation Proposal. The student will schedule meetings to present their dissertation proposal for approval once it has been review by members of the committee. The final oral defense of the dissertation must be completed within four years of entering candidacy after passing the Qualifying Exam.

Dissertation Defense

Once the student has completed work on the dissertation, the student will schedule a date with his/her Dissertation Committee for the final oral examination during which the student will defend the dissertation. The dissertation must be approved by the committee and the Chair of the Department by majority vote before it can be submitted to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies. The defense is a public event to which members of the University community will be invited as well as those the student worked with on the project.

Dissertation Preparation

The dissertation copy must follow the guidelines of School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies located at http://louisville.edu/graduate/current-students/thesis-dissertation-information.

Dissertation Submission

The following steps must be taken to submit the final copy of the dissertation electronically after oral defense and approval of the committee:

  1. Final document must be converted to a PDF (following the guidelines as noted above) and sent to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies and the department’s administrative assistant.
  2. Submit as advised by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies through the ThinkIR repository.
  3. The signature page within the electronic version must have the names of your committee members typed under the signature line; the signatures cannot be scanned into the document.
  4. Submit a signed signature page on white paper, with original signatures, to the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies, attention Courtney Kerr.

Faculty

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SCIENCES

Gary Hoyle

Professor
Chair

Robert J. Jacobs
Professor

Director of M.P.H. Program

Rachel Neal

Associate Professor

Zhang Qunwei

Professor

DEPARTMENT OF EPIDEMIOLOGY & POPULATION HEALTH

Richard N. Baumgartner
Professor

Chair

Kathy B. Baumgartner
Professor

Associate Dean

Stephanie Boone
Assistant Professor

Frank Groves

Associate Professor

Richard Kerber

Professor

Joann Schulte
Associate Professor

Kira Taylor

Assistant Professor

Anne B. Wallis

Assistant Professor

Kristina Zierold

Associate Professor

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH MANAGEMENT & SYSTEMS SCIENCES

Susan Olson Allen

Assistant Professor

Joseph Benitez

Assistant Professor

Lee W. Bewley
Associate Professor

Program Director, Healthcare Leadership

Craig Blakely

Professor
Dean

Priya Chandan
Assistant Professor

Liza Creel

Assistant Professor

Bob Esterhay

Associate Professor

J’Aime Jennings

Assistant Professor

Chris Johnson
Professor

Chair

Bert Little

Professor

Rob Steiner

Professor

Barry Wainscott

Emeritus Assistant Professor

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH PROMOTION & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Richard Clover

Professor

Ryan M. Combs

Assistant Professor

Muriel J. Harris

Associate Professor

Jelani Kerr

Assistant Professor

A. Scott LaJoie

Associate Professor

William P. McKinney
Professor

Associate Dean

Pete Walton

Assistant Professor
Associate Dean

Monica Wendel
Associate Professor

Associate Dean

Richard W. Wilson
Professor

Chair