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Target Populations

The two largest minority populations in Kentucky are African Americans and Hispanics (Census Data, 2010). Individuals from these two minority groups comprise 23.6% of the total Louisville population, which is slightly lower than the national average of 24.9%, but represents a significant increase from fifteen years ago.

Overview 

The two largest minority populations in Kentucky are African Americans and Hispanics (Census Data, 2010).  Individuals from these two minority groups comprise 23.6% of the total Louisville population, which is slightly lower than the national average of 24.9%, but represents a significant increase from fifteen years ago.

Our initial program has focused on strengthening partnerships and credibility with community-based organizations providing services to Hispanics in Shelbyville, Kentucky.  This was followed by the creation of a Lay Health Educators/Promotores Network.  To date, the Shelbyville Promotores have completed the first ever comprehensive community help and needs assessment required to define the health status, needs, and priorities of community residents.

Kentucky has the 7th largest percent increase in Hispanics in the United States (173%, 1990-2000).

We are extending the "train-the-trainer" model of education to disadvantaged communities in Jefferson County, with an emphasis on the West end sector of Louisville. 

  

Shelbyville Community

Shelbyville is a city in Shelby County, Kentucky that was founded on land donated by William Shannin in 1792, and named after Kentucky's first governor, Isaac Shelby.   The population was reported to be 10,085 in the 2000 census, and estimated at 11,507 in 2009.  The racial/ethnic makeup of the city was found to be 74.97% White, 16.35% African Americans, 0.33% Native Americans, 0.53% Asians, 0.33% Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics or Latinos  of any race 9.51% of the population. 

Though Shelbville is unheard of by many, its historical relevance and continuing cultural contributions are to be noted. Colonel Harland Sanders, founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, lived in Shelbyville from 1960 until his death in 1980. Shelbyville is known as the Saddlebreed capital of the World, in part due to the Saddlebred horse breed being developed in Kentucky by plantation owners.  Still today, Shelbyville holds an annual horse show, which is visited by many local and out of state individuals.

Hispanic workers began moving to the Shelbyville area as factory jobs became more readily available. The Hispanic presence began to change from season workers to factory employees, from transient outsiders to year round neighbors, from part-time living to full-time residents, from obscure novelty to permanent fixtures, from unaccompanied men to family-centered men, and from homogeneous groupings (e.g. Mexican, Guatemalan identity) to heterogeneous development (e.g. Mexican parents with U.S. born children).  The Hispanic population increase is reportedly larger due to word-of-mouth dissemination of information.  When  Hispanics visit their country of origin, they are found returning to Kentucky with siblings, spouses, and friends.   The 2000 US Census Bureau counted 1,550 Hispanics in Shelby County.  This is a 15-fold increase from the 1990 count.  The unofficial count of Hispanics in Shelby County is estimated to be between 4,000-8,000 people. 

Shelbyville community 2

 

 

West Louisville Community

West Louisville was designated by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development as an Enterprise Community in 1994.  However, today it is characterized as one of the most economically depressed urban neighborhoods in the United States (Jefferson County 2007).

According to the 2000 US Census, 90,110 people live in the West Louisville area.   The poverty rate in West Louisville is 42% compared to the regional average of 12.4% (Census 2000).   The Health Status Assessment Report of 2009 indicates that the childhood poverty level in West Louisville (48%)  is triple the rate of that in the Greater Louisville Metro area,  as well as the US (18.5% and 16.6%, respectively).

 The African-American community represents the largest segment of the Louisville minority population and is concentrated in two areas of the community: the Northwest and the South Central areas of Jefferson County (2009 Health Assessment Report).   

 

 West louisville community 6west Louisville KY

 

2009 Louisville Metro Health Status Report

 

  • Highest rate of uninsured individuals (25%)
  • Highest rates of cardiovascular disease (50%)
  • Highest rates of death due to lung cancer (75%)
  • Rate of stroke is disproportionately higher than the rest of Kentucky
  • High prevalence of adult's smoking
  • Highest infant mortality rate
  • High rates of low birth weights
  • Highest number of children with lead levels above recommended amounts

 

For additional information on the Health Status Report go to:

http://www.louisvilleky.gov/NR/rdonlyres/D4D5B175-3756-44A5-B8A7-B231AFE01511/0/2009HSARPresentation.pdf

 

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