Andrew Rabin

Andrew Rabin

Professor

Contact Information

Bio

Andrew Rabin (Curriculum Vitae) joined the English Department in 2005 after receiving his B.A. from Grinnell College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His research examines the law and literature of early medieval England. His most recent book, The Disputatio Puerorum: A Ninth- Century Monastic Instructional Text (to be published in 2017 by the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies), provides the first modern edition of one of the most widely-used Carolingian manuals of theology. He has also published The Political Writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York (Manchester, 2015), which concerns the political and legal works of Anglo-Saxon England’s most influential social theorist. In addition, he has edited multiple essay collections on early English law and published articles in such journals as Modern Philology, Studies in Philology, the Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, and (because he occasionally likes to publish in venues that don’t have “philology” in the title) Speculum. Professor Rabin is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.


Professor Rabin teaches courses on Old and Middle English literature, literature and law, and the history of literary theory from Plato to the present. He also serves as Vice Chair of the Department of English.

 

 Courses Taught

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Extensive practice in literary analysis and in the forms and conventions of writing about various literary genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105 or WGST 199. Note: Cross-listed with WGST 325. The literary treatment of women by both female and male authors of the Western tradition.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105, membership in English Honors Program. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Two seminars required of all students within the departmental honors program.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 310 or 300 Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Formerly ENGL-313; credit may not be earned for this course by students with credit for ENGL-313. Study of selected works, in a variety of genres, from the beginning through Shakespeare. Taught with attention to historical and cultural context. Historical period: pre-1700.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 306 and 310. Study of selected theories for the interpretation of literary and other texts, from the New Criticism to the present.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105: junior standing. Readings in the original language of Old English prose and poetry.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 105; junior standing. In-depth study of selected movements, genres, topics, or groupings of writers from the Old and/or Middle English periods. Historical Period: pre-1700.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; junior standing. In-depth study of selected movements, genres, topics or groupings of writers from the Restoration and/or Eighteenth Century periods. Historical Period: 1700-1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; junior standing. Note: A maximum of 6 hours in special-topics courses may be counted toward the major. Topics to be announced in schedule of courses. Historical Period: varies by semester.
Topics to be announced in schedule of courses. Historical Period: varies by semester.
Prerequisite: ENGL 310; junior standing. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). In-depth analysis of and intensive writing about a focused area of study within the discipline of English.
Introduces students to research methods, print and electronic resources, strategies for reading and writing scholarly texts, and the seminar format.
Intensive survey of the major literary figures and intellectual traditions of medieval England , with attention to modern critical approaches.
Intensive survey of the major literary figures and intellectual traditions of Eighteenth Century England, with attention to modern critical approaches.
A selective survey of theories of interpretation from the New Criticism to the present, and of interpretive practices based on these theories.

Educational Background

    Ph.D. from University of Chicago

      Teaching Areas

        Old and Middle English Literature

          Research Interests

            Old English Language and Literature, Anglo-Saxon Law, History of the English Language, Middle English Literature, Medieval Theories of Language and Rhetoric

              Select Publications

              Books
              Andrew Rabin, Archbishop Wulfstan of York: Old English Legal Writings, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (Cambridge: Harvard University Press) under contract, publication expected in 2019.

              Andrew Rabin, Lisi Oliver, and Stefan Jurasinski, eds. Old English Law: A Reader, Old English Publications, v. 3 (Phoenix: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies), in press, publication in 2018.

              Andrew Rabin and Liam Felsen, The Disputatio puerorum: A Ninth-Century Monastic Instructional Text, Toronto Medieval Latin Texts,  (Toronto: The Pontifical Institute for Medieval Studies), 2017.

              Andrew Rabin, The Political Writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York (Manchester: Manchester University Press), 2015.

              Edited Collections
              Stefan Jurasinski and Andrew Rabin, Languages of the Law in Early Medieval England: Essays in Memory of Lisi Oliver (Phoenix: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies), under contract, publication expected 2018.

              Andrew Rabin, ed. Dante: The Inferno, Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism, vol. 142 (Farmington Hills, MI: Gale-Cengage), 2012.

              Andrew Rabin, ed. The Venerable Bede, Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism, vol. 130 (Farmington Hills, MI: Gale-Cengage), 2011.
                                                                 
              Andrew Rabin, ed., Law and Legal Culture in Early Medieval Europe, special issue of the academic journal Heroic Age, vol. 14, no. 2 (2011).  http://www.mun.ca/mst/heroicage/issues/14/toc.php.

              Stefan Jurasinski, Lisi Oliver, and Andrew Rabin, eds. English Law Before Magna Carta: Felix Liebermann and Die Gesetze der Angelsachsen (Leiden: Brill), 2010.


              Articles
              ”Elizabeth Elstob, Old English Law, and the Origin of Anglo-Saxon Studies: A Critical Edition of Samuel Pegge’s ‘An Historical Account … of the Textus Roffensis’ (1767),”in Sharon Rowley, ed. Rosarium Amicitiae: Essays in Honor of Christina von Nolcken (Phoenix: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies), forthcoming, 2018.

              “Sharper than a Serpent’s Tooth: Parent-Child Litigation in Anglo-Saxon England,” in Susan Irvine and Winfried Rudolf, Childhood and Adolescence in Anglo-Saxon Literary Culture (Toronto: Toronto University Press, 2017), pp. 270-90.

              "Gang Violence in the Laws of Alfred the Great: The Problem of Hloð-Sliht," Notes and Queries, v. 63, no. 4 (2016), pp. 516-21.

              Patrick Wormald, “Archbishop Wulfstan’s Canon Law Collection,” ed. Andrew Rabin. The Old English Newsletter, v. 46, no. 1 (2016), n.p.

              “Wulfstan at London: Episcopal Politics in the Reign of Æthelred,” English Studies, v. 97, no. 2 (2016), pp. 186-206.

              “Archbishop Wulfstan of York” in Oxford Bibliographies in British and Irish Literature, ed. Andrew Hadfield. New  York: Oxford University Press (2016), n.p.

              “Archbishop Wulfstan’s ‘Compilation on Status’ in the Textus Roffensis,” in Barbara Bombi and Bruce O’Brien, eds. Textus Roffensis: Law, Language, and Libraries in Medieval England (Turnhout: Brepols, 2015), pp. 175-92.

              “Medieval Law” in Oxford Bibliographies in British and Irish Literature, ed. Andrew Hadfield. New York: Oxford University Press (2015), n.p.

              “Courtly Habits: Monastic Women’s Legal Literacy in Early Anglo-Saxon England,” in Virginia Blanton, Veronica O’Meara, and Patricia Stoop, eds. Nuns’ Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Kansas City Dialogue (Turnhout: Brepols, 2015), pp. 179-89.

              “Monsters in the Library: Karl August Eckhardt and Felix Liebermann,” OUPBlog, August 5th, 2014.

              "Capital Punishment and the Anglo-Saxon Judicial Apparatus: A Maximum View?" in Jay Paul Gates And Nicole Marafioti, eds. Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England (Woodbridge:Boydell, 2014), pp. 181-200.

              “Witnessing Kingship: Royal Power and the Legal Subject in the Old English Laws,” in Gale Owen-Crocker and Brian W. Schneider, ed. Kingship, Legislation and Power in Anglo-Saxon England (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2013), pp. 219-236.

              “Holy Bodies, Legal Matters: Reaction and Reform in Ælfric's Eugenia and the Ely Privilege,” Studies in Philology, v. 110, no. 2, (Spring, 2013): pp. 220-65.

              “Law and Justice” in Jacqueline Stodnick and Renee Trilling, eds. The Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Studies (Oxford: Blackwell, 2012), pp. 85-98.

              “Testimony and Authority in Old English Law: Writing the Subject in the Fonthill Letter,” in Robert S. Sturges, ed. Law and Sovereignty in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, Arizona Studies in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, v. 28 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2011) pp. 153-72.

              “Felix Liebermann and Die Gesetze der Angelsachsen,” in Stefan Jurasinski, Lisi Oliver, and Andrew Rabin, eds. English Law Before Magna Carta: Felix Liebermann and Die Gesetze der Angelsachsen (Leiden: Brill, 2010), pp. 1-8.

              “Ritual Magic or Legal Performance? Reconsidering an Old English Charm Against Theft,” in Stefan Jurasinski, Lisi Oliver, and Andrew Rabin, eds. English Law Before Magna Carta: Felix Liebermann and Die Gesetze der Angelsachsen (Leiden: Brill, 2010), pp. 177-198.

              “Evidence for Wulfstan’s Authorship of the Old English Að,” Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, v. 111, no. 1 (2010): 43-52.

              “Hypermetric Verse in an Old English Charm Against Theft,” Notes & Queries, v. 56, no. 4 (2009): 482-85.

              “A Once and Future Dude: The Big Lebowski as Medieval Grail-Quest,” in The Year’s Work in Lebowski Studies, ed. Aaron Jaffe and Edward Commentale (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2009), pp. 58-73.

              “Female Advocacy and Royal Protection in Tenth Century England: The Legal Career of Queen Ælfthryth,” Speculum, v. 84, no. 2 (April, 2009): 261-88. Winner of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists 2011 Prize for Best Article of the 2009-10 Biennium

              “Bede, Dryhthelm, and the Witness to the Other World: Testimony and Conversion in the Historia Ecclesiastica,” Modern Philology, v. 106, no. 3 (February, 2009): 375-98.

              “Anglo-Saxon Women Before the Law: Student Editions of Five Old English Lawsuits,” Old English Newsletter, v. 41, no. 3 (2008): 33-56.

              "'The Snare of Deceitful Thoughts': Reading Holofernes's Flynet in the Old English Judith," The Kentucky Philological Review, v. 22 (2008): 46-54.

              “Old English forespeca and the Role of the Advocate in Old English Law,” Mediæval Studies, v. 69 (2007): 223-54.

              “The Wolf’s Testimony to the English: Law and the Witness in the Sermo Lupi ad Anglos,” JEGP, v. 105, no. 3 (2006): 388-414.

              “Historical Re-Collections: Rewriting the World Chronicle in Bede’s De Temporum Ratione,” Viator 36 (2005): 23-39.