Karen Chandler

Associate Professor
Email: karen.chandler @ louisville.edu
Phone:502-852-5568
Office Hours: Fall Term: TTh 9:30 - 10:45

 

Courses Taught

Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105 Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication(WR). An introduction to English Studies,providing an overview of forms such as poetry, drama,and the novel,and an introduction to terminology and methods used in analyzing texts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. A survey of American writers. Historical period: 1700-1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 300 or 310. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Formerly ENGL-320; credit may not be earned for this course by students with credit for ENGL-320. Study of selected works, in a variety of genres, from the Civil War to 1910. Taught with attention to historical and cultural context. Historical period: 1700-1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 300 or 310. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Formerly ENGL-323; credit may not be earned for this course by students with credit for ENGL-323. Study of selected works, in a variety of genres, by African American writers from 1845 to the present day. Taught with attention to historical and cultural context. Historical period: post 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; junior standing. Note: A maximum of 6 hours in special-topics courses may be counted toward the major. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Courses. Historical Period: varies by semester.
Prerequisite: ENGL 310; junior standing. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). In-depth analysis of and intensive writing about a focused area of study within the discipline of English.
A course in genre studies, featuring in any given semester the drama, biography, the essay, satire, etc..
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Intensive study of Afican American literature and culture from any period or across several periods.

Educational Background

    M.A., Ph.D., English, University of Pennsylvania

      Teaching Areas

        American Literature
        African-American Literature
        Film
        Literacy Studies
        Children's and YA literature
        Historical narrative
        Readers

        Research Interests

          I am researching and writing about children’s and young adult literature, American and African American literature and vernacular cultures. Julius Lester is the focus of one current project; literature about and illustrations of jazz performance are the focus of another.

            Professional Memberships

              Member, Children's Literature Association

              Select Publications

              “Creative Defiance in Juan Francisco Manzano’s The Autobiography of a Slave and Margarita Engle’s The Poet Slave of Cuba.Sankofa: A Journal of African Children’s and Young Adult Literature 10 (2011): 46-54. Print.

              “Partial Measures.” Saraba 8 (2011): 9-14. Web.

              “Preserving ‘that Racial Memory’: Figurative Language, Sonnet Sequence, and the Work of

              Remembrance in Marilyn Nelson’s A Wreath for Emmett Till.” The Southern Quarterly: The Legacy of Emmett Till (special issue) 45 (Summer 2008): 101-117.

              “Paths to Freedom: Literacy and Folk Ways in Recent Children’s Narratives about Slavery.” CLAQ (Children’s Literature Association Quarterly) 31 (Spring 2006): 3-26.

              “‘Wonderful Dealings’: Making African-American Selfhood Speak through Colonial Literary Conventions in John Marrant’s Conversion and Captivity Narrative.” MAWA Review 16 (June/Dec 2001): 20-39.

              “Charles Chesnutt’s Cultural Exchange: Race and the Reading of Melodrama in ‘Her Virginia Mammy.’” South Central Review 17 (Summer 2000): 6-23.

              “Folk Culture and Masculine Identity in Charles Burnett’s To Sleep with Anger.”  African American Review 33 (1999): 299-311.

              “Funeral Imagery in Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” Obsidian III 1

              (1999): 239-250.

              “Nella Larsen’s Fatal Polarities: Melodrama and Its Limits in Quicksand.” CLA Journal 42

              (1998): 24-47.

              "Agency and Social Constraint: Jane Campion's The Portrait of a Lady."  The Henry James

              Review 18 (Spring 1997): 191-193.

              “Agency and Stella Dallas: Audience, Melodramatic Directives, and Social Determinism in

              1920s America."  Arizona Quarterly 51 (Winter 1995): 27-44.

              Paths to Freedom: Literacy and Folk Traditions in Recent Narratives about Slavery and Emancipation
              Children's Literature Association Quarterly (CLAQ) 31 (2006):3-26

              "Kin Flicks" in I TO I: Life Writing by Kentucky Feminists, ed. Elizabeth Oakes and Jane Olmsted

              "Making Noise" in THESE HANDS I KNOW: AFRICAN-AMERICAN WRITERS ON FAMILY, ed. Afaa Michael Weaver

              "'Wonderful Dealings': Making African-American Selfhood Speak Through Colonial Literary Conventions in John Marrant's Conversion and Indian Captivity Narrative" in MAWA REVIEW