Stephen Schneider

Assistant Professor
Director of Graduate Studies
Email: stephen.schneider @ louisville.edu
Phone:502-852-2188
Office Hours: Fall Term: M-F 1:00 - 4:00

 

Courses Taught

Prerequisite: Meet admission requirements of the University of Louisville. Students engage in critical thinking and writing by developing their writing processes and producing finished prose. Required writing consists of multiple drafts of 4-6 papers of varying lengths.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. Focuses on responding to differing rhetorical situations at an advanced level in appropriate modes for diverse audiences. Emphasizes creating and revising several substantial writing projects. Develops critical reading and writing abilities in multiple genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Extensive practice in literary analysis and in the forms and conventions of writing about various literary genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 300 or 310. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Formerly ENGL-323; credit may not be earned for this course by students with credit for ENGL-323. Study of selected works, in a variety of genres, by African American writers from 1845 to the present day. Taught with attention to historical and cultural context. Historical period: post 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or 105; ENGL 306 and 310. Study of selected theories for the interpretation of literary and other texts, from the New Criticism to the present.
Prerequisite ENGL 300 or ENGL 309 or ENGL 310, or consent of instructor. Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR). Introduction to the theory, research, and practice that informs the effective teaching of writing.
Review of rhetorical theory and practice in the Greek, Roman, early Christian, medieval, and scholastic periods.
Review of rhetorical theory and practice in the English Renaissance, the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the modern and contemporary periods.
Involves discussion and analysis of advanced research topics leading to the dissertation.
A selective survey of theories of interpretation from the New Criticism to the present, and of interpretive practices based on these theories.

Educational Background

  • M.A., Ph.D., English, Pennsylvania State University

Research Interests

  • Social movement rhetorics
  • Education and social change
  • African American rhetoric
  • Rhetorical and critical theory