For Students

Contest winners at the 2014 Symposium on Student Writing

 

The composition program at the University of Louisville offers courses designed to help students at a variety of levels improve their writing and rhetorical skills, both within and outside of their disciplines. For more information about these courses, including student outcomes, see the full course descriptions.

The focus of English 101 is recognizing and responding to different rhetorical situations and developing effective writing processes. A student in English 101 should expect to write and revise essays in multiple genres. Each essay should establish a clear purpose and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 101 should expect to write four to six papers during the term totaling about 18-20 pages of text.
The focus of English 102 is creating and answering questions through research and writing that draws upon written texts and other sources. A student in English 102 should expect to create research questions, find relevant information to answer those questions, and write longer essays that use the information to create and support a clearly defined position on the topic involved. A student in English 102 can expect to write four to six papers during the term, including at least one extended research essay, totaling about 20 to 25 pages of text.
English 105 is an honors course that satisfies both the English 101 and English 102 requirements. To enroll in the course, incoming first-year students must have an ACT composite score of 28 or higher or the equivalent SAT score of 1240 (composite math and verbal scores) and a high school grade point average (GPA) of 3.5. Because English 105 is the only first-year writing course honors students are required to take, it needs to cover the rhetorical and writing process concerns of English 101 as well as the writing with research concerns of English 102. Instructors teaching English 105 should also review the Student Learning Outcomes for English 101 and English 102. A student in English 105 should expect to write and revise essays in multiple genres, each with a clear purpose and sense of the writer’s presence and position. The student should also expect to create and answer questions through research and writing that draws upon written texts and other sources. A student in English 105 can expect to write four to six papers during the term, including at least one extended research essay, totaling about 20 to 25 pages of text.
The focus of English 303 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in scientific and technical discourse communities. A student in English 303 should expect to create and revise documents in multiple genres. Each document should establish a clear purpose, sense of audience awareness, and sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 303 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.
The focus of English 306 is recognizing and responding in writing to different rhetorical situations in the professional world. A student in English 306 should expect to create and revise documents that incorporate elements of critical thinking as well as demonstrate intellectual and professional standards of effective communication. A student in English 306 should expect to complete four-to-six projects.
The focus of English 309 is recognizing differing rhetorical situations and responding to them at an advanced level in appropriate modes for diverse audiences. A student in English 309 should expect to create and revise compositions in multiple genres. Compositions should establish a clear purpose, exhibit audience awareness, and reveal a sense of the writer’s presence and position. A student in English 309 should expect to complete four to six projects of their own design. Themes may vary per section as determined by the instructor.

Do you want to see your writing published?

Do you have a piece of writing that makes you particularly proud? Submit it to Cardinal Compositions, the UofL publication of student writing. You just might get to see your name in print next year.

Looking for a professor?

Check the list of English Faculty.

Got a question about a program policy?

Student poster at the 2014 Symposium on Student Writing

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